CFP: The Moon in Human Imagination

"Fly me to the moon" The moon in human imagination
University of Genova (Italy) December 12th-13th 2019

From October 2018 through December 2022, NASA will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Program that landed a dozen Americans on the moon between July 1969 and December 1972.

All kind of events, activities, exhibitions, seminars dedicated to celebrating the first moon landing are understandably spreading everywhere and we want to join the celebrations in our own way.

The moon has always been a source of mystery and enchantment to people of all times and has lit up our imagination for centuries: for writers and poets, the moon has been at one moment a beneficent and comforting presence offering refuge in nocturnal and idyllic landscapes, at the next a silent confidante to secret loves, but also a witness of misdeeds, crimes and mysterious adventures, as well as a power capable of generating werewolves and creatures of the night. From ancient times to modern Western art and literature, the Moon is a recurring subject of poetry and all sorts of artistic representations, an inspiration for mythologies and mysticism, the object of scientific inquiries and a crucial destination for science-­‐‑fiction fantasies. We might say that the attraction our satellite exerts on literature is at least as powerful as its pull on the tides.

The importance of the Moon as a source for the visual arts and literature in all times has long been recognized and, although the theme has been explored before, its influence is inexhaustible.

An international conference is an excellent opportunity for researchers in many different fields to keep exploring our various images of the Moon and to exchange ideas and share experiences and research methodologies.

The University of Genova, and in particular its Departments of Classics and Italian studies (DAFIST and DIRAAS), invites submissions of articles on the subject of the Moon to be presented at an international conference to be held in Genova on 12-­‐‑13 December 2019.

The deadline for submission is July 20th 20:17 UTC (date and time when the lunar module Eagle landed on the lunar surface).

Using the Moon as a source of inspiration, we invite scholars of Classical Studies, Medieval and Renaissance culture, Modern and Contemporary Literature, History and Philosophy, Music and Musicology, Cinema and Media Studies, to explore and discuss the many different ways that writers, poets, historians, artists, film makers have tried to capture the image of our satellite.

We welcome submissions from scholars at all levels of career, but especially encourage doctoral and advanced students.

Please send a brief curriculum vitae, and a proposal of approximately 500 words to lara.nicolini@unige.it, luca.beltrami@unige.it, lara.pagani@unige.it.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topic areas:

  • the Moon in mythology / lunar myths / the Moon and the Poets
  • the Moon in Ancient and Modern Novel and in Scientific literature
  • the Moon in Greek and Roman Literature
  • the Moon in Religion and History of religions
  • Magic of the Moon. The Moon in Magic
  • the Moon in Linguistic, Sociology etc. / Questioning the Grammar: Genre and Gender of the Moon
  • Science of the Moon / Knowledge and Science about the Moon (from Aristotle to Galileo to NASA) /. Animals and the Moon
  • Iconography of the Moon (from the ancient times to space-­‐‑age art) / Moon in Art History / Moon and Moonlight in the visual arts / Lunar landscapes / Visions of the night
  • the Moon in Science fiction, Cinema and media studies (from Verne to Hollywood)
  • Music by Moonlight: the Moon in the Music / Songs about the Moon

Submission guidelines

Authors from all over the world are invited to submit original and unpublished papers, which are not under review for any other conference or journal. All papers will be peer reviewed by the program committee and selected on the basis of their originality, significance, and methodological soundness.

Submitted abstracts can be written in Italian or English (the same goes for the papers).

The length of contributions must be between 4 and 8 pages (about 20/25-­‐‑minutes papers). Submission implies that the contributor is willing to attend the conference and present the paper.

The organizing committee looks forward to welcoming you all to a fruitful conference, open discussion and networking.

Key Dates

Submission deadline for abstracts: 20 July 2019

Author notification: 30 September 2019

Conference dates: 12-­‐‑13 December 2019

Conference venue

Genoa is one of the most beautiful Italian cities and a Mediterranean seaport. It embraces different cultures and traditions from the past, combined in a unique and original architecture. Its vast old town is an intricate maze of narrow alleys extending up to the seafront of the Old Harbour. The city center boasts Medieval buildings next to rich Renaissance noble palaces (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), museums and several churches hosting important art masterpieces, in a unique cohesion of past splendor and contemporary everyday life.

www.visitgenoa.it

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Information and an RSVP form for our Career Networking Event at this year's annual meeting are now available.

You can read about this event and sign up here:

https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2020/151/2020-annual-meeting-career-networking-event

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 11/12/2019 - 11:29am by Erik Shell.

What is the interplay between Classics and literary translation? What are the preparatory actions for launching a new journal that will address problems and lacunae within the field? Adrienne K.H. Rose explores the challenges of beginning a translation journal which will address the philosophies, difficulties, and necessity for diversity within the area of classical translation.

Early Latin translators, including Cicero (De optimo genere oratorum iv. 13-v.14), Horace (Ars poetica II.128-44), Quintilian (Institutio Oratoria X.xi 1-11; X.v.1-5), and Jerome (Chronicle 1-2) distinguish between the act of word for word––or literal translation––and literary translation. The latter type of translation prioritizes senses, aesthetics, and rhetorical verve. However, language pedagogy in Classics departments emphasize the first type of translation, word for word, and often stop short of encouraging more literary pursuits. In fact, creative translations that deviate from translationese (a kind of literal, affected translation style from which the reader may deduce the exact parsing of the original word) is actively discouraged.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 11/08/2019 - 6:29am by Adrienne K.H. Rose.

This is a reminder from the SCS Office that members hoping to register at the reduced Early Registration rate for the Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. must do so on or before this Friday, November 8th.

If you find you are unable to register or in need of any help please contact our registration vendor at aia-scs@showcare.com

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 11/06/2019 - 10:58am by Erik Shell.

2020 Annual Meeting: Seminars

For the first time since 2016, the SCS will be holding four seminars at this year’s annual meeting.

Seminars as a rule concentrate on more narrowly focused topics and aim at extensive discussion. In order to allow the time to be spent mainly on discussion, the SCS publishes a notice about the session in advance, and organizers distribute copies of the papers (normally three or four in number) to be discussed to those who request them.  Attendance at a seminar will, if necessary, be limited to the first 25 people who sign up. Seminars are normally three hours in length. Registered meeting attendees may sign up at no additional cost for one or more of these seminars.

Third Paper Session, Friday, January 3, 1:45-4:45 PM

State Elite? Senators, Emperors and Roman Political Culture 25BCE-400CE (Seminar)
John Weisweiler, St John's College, University of Cambridge, Organizer

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 11/04/2019 - 10:21am by Erik Shell.

"WARNING: Storm Approaching": Weather, the Environment, and Natural Disasters in the Ancient Mediterranean

24th Annual Classics Graduate Student Colloquium, University of Virginia
March 21, 2020

Keynote Speaker: Clara Bosak-Schroeder (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign): "Academia in the Climate Emergency"

Scientific, aesthetic, and religious conceptions of weather events appear throughout Classical antiquity, as the Greeks and Romans attempted to make sense of environmental phenomena. Often, these events were explained as expressions of divine wrath or favor. Storms and natural disasters figured as literary devices, for example to delay narrative action or as metaphors for the cyclic nature of human life. Climate, broadly defined, was thought to determine national character, and weather played a critical role in military expeditions. Recently, scholars have made considerable advances in applying principles of bioarchaeology to the study of the ancient world. Hand in hand with these, theorists working with the tools of ecocriticism envision a humanities broader than humans, accounting for the whole natural world.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 11/01/2019 - 2:55pm by Erik Shell.

Modern cinema and Greek tragedy illustrate that few things elicit a fear more profound than parents killing children. Horror movies have often grappled with figures of “monstrous” mothers in particular, from the obsessive, hypochondriac Sonia Kaspbrack in Stephen King's IT (1986), to the lonely, murderous Olivia Crain in Netflix's The Haunting of Hill House (2018). In Greek tragedy, too, mothers are often monsters: women like Medea, Agave or Althaea are all tragic examples of women who have killed their children. In both genres, these gestures of extreme violence are meant to shock and unsettle the audience by pushing back against “normal” familial bonds, bringing into question relationships of gender, the body and motherhood.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 11/01/2019 - 5:16am by Justin Lorenzo Biggi.

The Outreach Prize Committee is delighted to award the 2019 Outreach Prize of the Society for Classical Studies to Dr. Salvador Bartera, Assistant Professor of Classics and Dr. Donna Clevinger, Professor of Communication and Theatre at Mississippi State University in Starkville, Mississippi.  For the past five years, Professors Bartera and Clevinger have organized “Classical Week” at MSU, which includes a two-night run of an ancient comedy or tragedy and a colloquium about an aspect of the performance. This joint venture of the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and the Shakouls Honors College showcases the interdisciplinarity of the event, in which Dr. Clevinger choreographs and directs the production, Dr. Bartera serves as dramaturge, and both collaborate on the colloquium.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/31/2019 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

The Classics Program of the Department of Classical and Oriental Studies at Hunter College invites you to the Annual E. Adelaide Hahn Lecture.

Speaker: Emily Greenwood, Professor of Classics, Yale University

Friday November 8, 2019

  • Pre-Lecture Reception: 5:30-6:00 pm
  • Lecture: 6:00-7:00 pm “Verso Poetics: Black Women Poets and Classics”
  • Post-Lecture Reception: 7:00-7:30 pm

Location: Hunter College, 695 Park Ave., NY, NY 10065

8th floor Faculty / Staff Dining Room, Hunter West Building, 68th St. and Lexington Ave.

This event is open to the public. If you are a guest at Hunter, please bring a picture ID and stop at the Welcome Desk in the lobby of Hunter West Building, SW corner of 68th St. & Lex. (Then take the elevator to the 8th floor or the escalator to 3 and then the elevator to 8.)

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 10/28/2019 - 10:15am by Erik Shell.

The deadline to apply for the TLL Fellowship is November 8, 2019. The application includes many parts, and so should be started early.

Applications must be received by the deadline of Friday, November 8, 2019, at 5:00 p.m., Eastern Time. Applications should be submitted as e-mail attachments to Dr. Helen Cullyer, Executive Director, Society for Classical Studies, xd@classicalstudies.org.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 10/25/2019 - 8:15am by Erik Shell.

The new Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities all over the US and Canada with the worlds of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. As part of this initiative the SCS has been funding a variety of projects ranging from children’s programs to teaching Latin in a prison. In this post we focus on two programs that encourage audiences to look at the ancient material and traditional practices with a new lens, with a comparative and critical eye.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/25/2019 - 7:48am by .

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