CFP: The Moon in Human Imagination

"Fly me to the moon" The moon in human imagination
University of Genova (Italy) December 12th-13th 2019

From October 2018 through December 2022, NASA will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Program that landed a dozen Americans on the moon between July 1969 and December 1972.

All kind of events, activities, exhibitions, seminars dedicated to celebrating the first moon landing are understandably spreading everywhere and we want to join the celebrations in our own way.

The moon has always been a source of mystery and enchantment to people of all times and has lit up our imagination for centuries: for writers and poets, the moon has been at one moment a beneficent and comforting presence offering refuge in nocturnal and idyllic landscapes, at the next a silent confidante to secret loves, but also a witness of misdeeds, crimes and mysterious adventures, as well as a power capable of generating werewolves and creatures of the night. From ancient times to modern Western art and literature, the Moon is a recurring subject of poetry and all sorts of artistic representations, an inspiration for mythologies and mysticism, the object of scientific inquiries and a crucial destination for science-­‐‑fiction fantasies. We might say that the attraction our satellite exerts on literature is at least as powerful as its pull on the tides.

The importance of the Moon as a source for the visual arts and literature in all times has long been recognized and, although the theme has been explored before, its influence is inexhaustible.

An international conference is an excellent opportunity for researchers in many different fields to keep exploring our various images of the Moon and to exchange ideas and share experiences and research methodologies.

The University of Genova, and in particular its Departments of Classics and Italian studies (DAFIST and DIRAAS), invites submissions of articles on the subject of the Moon to be presented at an international conference to be held in Genova on 12-­‐‑13 December 2019.

The deadline for submission is July 20th 20:17 UTC (date and time when the lunar module Eagle landed on the lunar surface).

Using the Moon as a source of inspiration, we invite scholars of Classical Studies, Medieval and Renaissance culture, Modern and Contemporary Literature, History and Philosophy, Music and Musicology, Cinema and Media Studies, to explore and discuss the many different ways that writers, poets, historians, artists, film makers have tried to capture the image of our satellite.

We welcome submissions from scholars at all levels of career, but especially encourage doctoral and advanced students.

Please send a brief curriculum vitae, and a proposal of approximately 500 words to lara.nicolini@unige.it, luca.beltrami@unige.it, lara.pagani@unige.it.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topic areas:

  • the Moon in mythology / lunar myths / the Moon and the Poets
  • the Moon in Ancient and Modern Novel and in Scientific literature
  • the Moon in Greek and Roman Literature
  • the Moon in Religion and History of religions
  • Magic of the Moon. The Moon in Magic
  • the Moon in Linguistic, Sociology etc. / Questioning the Grammar: Genre and Gender of the Moon
  • Science of the Moon / Knowledge and Science about the Moon (from Aristotle to Galileo to NASA) /. Animals and the Moon
  • Iconography of the Moon (from the ancient times to space-­‐‑age art) / Moon in Art History / Moon and Moonlight in the visual arts / Lunar landscapes / Visions of the night
  • the Moon in Science fiction, Cinema and media studies (from Verne to Hollywood)
  • Music by Moonlight: the Moon in the Music / Songs about the Moon

Submission guidelines

Authors from all over the world are invited to submit original and unpublished papers, which are not under review for any other conference or journal. All papers will be peer reviewed by the program committee and selected on the basis of their originality, significance, and methodological soundness.

Submitted abstracts can be written in Italian or English (the same goes for the papers).

The length of contributions must be between 4 and 8 pages (about 20/25-­‐‑minutes papers). Submission implies that the contributor is willing to attend the conference and present the paper.

The organizing committee looks forward to welcoming you all to a fruitful conference, open discussion and networking.

Key Dates

Submission deadline for abstracts: 20 July 2019

Author notification: 30 September 2019

Conference dates: 12-­‐‑13 December 2019

Conference venue

Genoa is one of the most beautiful Italian cities and a Mediterranean seaport. It embraces different cultures and traditions from the past, combined in a unique and original architecture. Its vast old town is an intricate maze of narrow alleys extending up to the seafront of the Old Harbour. The city center boasts Medieval buildings next to rich Renaissance noble palaces (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), museums and several churches hosting important art masterpieces, in a unique cohesion of past splendor and contemporary everyday life.

www.visitgenoa.it

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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If you are a teacher at the pre-collegiate level and have student loans, please read carefully through everything at the following link. You may be eligible for forgiveness and/or cancellation.

http://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/charts/teacher

Ronnie Ancona

APA VP for Education

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/30/2013 - 10:03pm by Ronnie Ancona.

From the iTunes App Store:

Use one app to look up any Greek or Latin word: Logeion was developed at the University of Chicago to provide simultaneous lookup of entries in the many reference works that make up the Perseus Classical collection. Most reference works represented in this app are based on digitized texts from the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University.

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon (1940)
  • Liddell and Scott's Intermediate Greek Lexicon (1889)
  • Autenrieth's Homeric Dictionary
  • Slater's Lexicon to Pindar (1969)
  • Lewis's Elementary Latin Dictionary (1890)
  • Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities
  • Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites
  • Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography
  • Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities
  • Perseus Encyclopedia

The app draws data from the following Greek and Latin textbooks.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sat, 10/26/2013 - 10:08am by .

In recognition of Open Access Week, the "Profhacker" blog at The Chronicle for Higher Education has posted an instructional video about open access. Although it deals exclusively with open access as it applies to research in the sciences, it is relevant for scholars in the humanities, too.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Thu, 10/24/2013 - 9:39am by .

California Classical Studies is pleased to announce as No. 2 in its series the publication of a digital edition of Edward Courtney, A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal, a reprint with corrections of the edition of 1980. The 555-page book may be read in page view at the open-access eScholarship repository operated by the California Digital Library of the University of California. It is also available as a Print on Demand paperback ($49.95) or in ePub format ($29.95). After an embargo period of 2 years, the open-access site will provide a free download of the full print-quality PDF.

Open-access page for A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal:

http://escholarship.org/uc/item/4jh846pn

Site for purchase of POD paperback or ePub version of California Classical Studies books:

http://escholarship-california_classical_studies.lulu.com/spotlight/

Information for potential contributors to the series:

http://calclassicalstudies.org/?page_id=42

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 10/21/2013 - 9:48pm by .

(CNN) -- Clusters of Roman skulls have been discovered deep below London's Liverpool Street by construction workers digging a new rail route through England's capital.

Tunnelers working on the Crossrail project found about 20 skulls, deep beneath the 16th century Bedlam burial ground in the center of the city, Crossrail said in a statement.

Read more: Rail excavation unearths suspected 'plague pit'

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:51am by Information Architect.

Sorbonne, Paris 13th and 14th February 2014

We have now placed the program and the abstracts for the final session of our series on
Roman Declamation - Calpurnius Flaccus - on the conference website.

https://sites.google.com/site/readingromandeclamation/2014-session

The event will take place 13th and 14th February 2014 in the Sorbonne's Maison de la
Recherche, 28 Rue Serpente, 75006 Paris (map on the website).

Speakers:
Michael Winterbottom (Oxford)
Christopher van den Berg (Amherst)
Catherine Schneider (Strasbourg)
Lydia Spielberg (University of Pennsylvania)
Biagio Santorelli (Pisa)
Alessandra Rolle (Lausanne)
Julien Pingoud (Lausanne)
Jonathan Mannering (Loyola, Chicago)
Alfredo Casamento (Palermo)
Lauren Cadwell (Wesleyan University)
Andrea Balbo (Turin)

Chairs:
Jean Michel David (Pantheon-Sorbonne)
Sylvie Franchet d'Esperey (Sorbonne)
Danielle van Mal Mader (Lausanne)

Organisers:
Martin Dinter (KCL/FAPESP-USP)
Charles Guerin (Montpellier and Institut universitaire de France)
Marcos Martinho (University of Sao Paulo)
Sebastien Morlet (Paris IV - Sorbonne)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:19am by .

I am happy to report that we have just received the message below from Dr. Martin Brady, Chair of the Central Council of the Classical Association of Ireland.

Denis Feeney

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Dear all,

I have just received news that proposals to close the Department of Classics in Cork and transfer its staff to the Department of History have been withdrawn. Classics maintains an independent identity at University College Cork - for now, at least. Sincere thanks for all of you who signed the petition, and for all of you who wrote to the President of UCC to make your feelings on this matter known.

best & regards,

Dr Martin Brady

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 10/14/2013 - 11:20am by Adam Blistein.

Dear friends, sympathizers and fellow classicists,

In 2012, the Faculty of Arts decided to gradually cut down Latin as a major subject. However, the detailed budget plan now anticipates the abandonment of all Latin courses, as well as the introductory courses of Ancient Greek and most subjects relating to classical culture. By this radical cutting off of the classical roots, the faculty loses an essential component to the understanding of western philosophy, art, history, language and literature.

By this petition, we ask the preservation in the long term of one Latin professorship at the Free University of Brussels. We are convinced that such position can serve the purpose of not only the faculty of arts, but also the entire university community.

To sign the petition click: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/557/100/788/quo-vadis-vub-zonder-latijn-free-university-of-brussels-without-latin/

"Qui tacet, consentire videtur".

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 10/08/2013 - 5:39am by .

Steven Perkins, Latin teacher since 1998 at North Central High School in Indianapolis, has been named Teacher of the Year by the Indianapolis Department of Education.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 10/08/2013 - 1:32am by Adam Blistein.

The following members were chosen in the elections held this Summer. They take office on January 5, 2014, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/02/2013 - 9:15pm by .

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