CFP: The Moon in Human Imagination

"Fly me to the moon" The moon in human imagination
University of Genova (Italy) December 12th-13th 2019

From October 2018 through December 2022, NASA will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Program that landed a dozen Americans on the moon between July 1969 and December 1972.

All kind of events, activities, exhibitions, seminars dedicated to celebrating the first moon landing are understandably spreading everywhere and we want to join the celebrations in our own way.

The moon has always been a source of mystery and enchantment to people of all times and has lit up our imagination for centuries: for writers and poets, the moon has been at one moment a beneficent and comforting presence offering refuge in nocturnal and idyllic landscapes, at the next a silent confidante to secret loves, but also a witness of misdeeds, crimes and mysterious adventures, as well as a power capable of generating werewolves and creatures of the night. From ancient times to modern Western art and literature, the Moon is a recurring subject of poetry and all sorts of artistic representations, an inspiration for mythologies and mysticism, the object of scientific inquiries and a crucial destination for science-­‐‑fiction fantasies. We might say that the attraction our satellite exerts on literature is at least as powerful as its pull on the tides.

The importance of the Moon as a source for the visual arts and literature in all times has long been recognized and, although the theme has been explored before, its influence is inexhaustible.

An international conference is an excellent opportunity for researchers in many different fields to keep exploring our various images of the Moon and to exchange ideas and share experiences and research methodologies.

The University of Genova, and in particular its Departments of Classics and Italian studies (DAFIST and DIRAAS), invites submissions of articles on the subject of the Moon to be presented at an international conference to be held in Genova on 12-­‐‑13 December 2019.

The deadline for submission is July 20th 20:17 UTC (date and time when the lunar module Eagle landed on the lunar surface).

Using the Moon as a source of inspiration, we invite scholars of Classical Studies, Medieval and Renaissance culture, Modern and Contemporary Literature, History and Philosophy, Music and Musicology, Cinema and Media Studies, to explore and discuss the many different ways that writers, poets, historians, artists, film makers have tried to capture the image of our satellite.

We welcome submissions from scholars at all levels of career, but especially encourage doctoral and advanced students.

Please send a brief curriculum vitae, and a proposal of approximately 500 words to lara.nicolini@unige.it, luca.beltrami@unige.it, lara.pagani@unige.it.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topic areas:

  • the Moon in mythology / lunar myths / the Moon and the Poets
  • the Moon in Ancient and Modern Novel and in Scientific literature
  • the Moon in Greek and Roman Literature
  • the Moon in Religion and History of religions
  • Magic of the Moon. The Moon in Magic
  • the Moon in Linguistic, Sociology etc. / Questioning the Grammar: Genre and Gender of the Moon
  • Science of the Moon / Knowledge and Science about the Moon (from Aristotle to Galileo to NASA) /. Animals and the Moon
  • Iconography of the Moon (from the ancient times to space-­‐‑age art) / Moon in Art History / Moon and Moonlight in the visual arts / Lunar landscapes / Visions of the night
  • the Moon in Science fiction, Cinema and media studies (from Verne to Hollywood)
  • Music by Moonlight: the Moon in the Music / Songs about the Moon

Submission guidelines

Authors from all over the world are invited to submit original and unpublished papers, which are not under review for any other conference or journal. All papers will be peer reviewed by the program committee and selected on the basis of their originality, significance, and methodological soundness.

Submitted abstracts can be written in Italian or English (the same goes for the papers).

The length of contributions must be between 4 and 8 pages (about 20/25-­‐‑minutes papers). Submission implies that the contributor is willing to attend the conference and present the paper.

The organizing committee looks forward to welcoming you all to a fruitful conference, open discussion and networking.

Key Dates

Submission deadline for abstracts: 20 July 2019

Author notification: 30 September 2019

Conference dates: 12-­‐‑13 December 2019

Conference venue

Genoa is one of the most beautiful Italian cities and a Mediterranean seaport. It embraces different cultures and traditions from the past, combined in a unique and original architecture. Its vast old town is an intricate maze of narrow alleys extending up to the seafront of the Old Harbour. The city center boasts Medieval buildings next to rich Renaissance noble palaces (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), museums and several churches hosting important art masterpieces, in a unique cohesion of past splendor and contemporary everyday life.

www.visitgenoa.it

---

(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

The Program Guide for the January 2013 Annual Meeting will appear in October.  Organizers of affiliated group and organizer-refereed sessions that have been approved for presentation at the 2013 meeting are reminded that calls for abstracts for their sessions should be sent to the Association Office no later than September 16, 2011.  See the APA web site (http://apaclassics.org/index.php/annual_meeting/meeting_info/calls_for_a...) for samples of previously published calls for abstracts.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 07/18/2011 - 1:46pm by Adam Blistein.

The Roundtable Discussion Session is a 90-minute joint annual meeting session with the AIA consisting of a number of tables devoted to discussions of a variety of topics, with at least one discussion leader for each topic.  Members are invited to propose themselves as roundtable discussion leaders.  Topics may be the leader’s area of scholarly interest or an issue important to the profession.  Since certain topics lend themselves to presentation by more than one leader, proposals for multiple leaders are welcome.  The Program Committee believes that these sessions can provide an excellent opportunity for younger registrants (both graduate students and recent Ph.D.'s) to interact with established scholars in a less formal environment than a session or a job interview.  Leadership of a roundtable discussion does not count as an “appearance” on the annual meeting program; i.e., roundtable leaders may present a paper or serve as a respondent in an APA paper session.

The Program Committee invites members to submit brief (50-100 word) descriptions of a suitable topic for a roundtable.  These submissions for the annual meeting in Philadelphia, PA should be sent to Heather Gasda (heatherh@sas.upenn.edu) by September 6, 2011.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 07/14/2011 - 7:47pm by Adam Blistein.

Mabel Louise Lang, emeritus professor of Greek at Bryn Mawr College, died peacefully on July 21, 2010, at the age of 92. She had spent more than seventy years at Bryn Mawr, where she was worshipped by generations of students and admired by scholars around the world.

Lang was born on November 12, 1917 in Utica, New York, and received her AB from Cornell in 1939 and her PhD from Bryn Mawr in 1943. She began teaching at Bryn Mawr in 1943 and continued to do so long after her official retirement in 1988, allowing more than half a century’s worth of students to benefit from her extraordinary ability to bring out the best in them.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 07/13/2011 - 7:16pm by Adam Blistein.

Malcolm Burgess, publisher of the City-Lit series, selects his favourite reads about the eternal city, from I, Claudius to the Rome of Fellini and beyond. Read more in The Guardian online.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Wed, 07/13/2011 - 1:40pm by Information Architect.

The following questionnaire appeard on the Humanist Discussion Group:

Manuscripts Online: Written Culture from 1100 to 1500

Manuscripts Online is a new project that aims to enable federated searching of transcriptions, editions, catalogue descriptions, and calendars of primary texts in English, Latin, French, Welsh etc from or relevant to the British Isles, 1100-1500, on the model of Connected Histories for 1500-1900 (http://www.connectedhistories.org/). The service will be hosted by the University of Sheffield Humanities Research Institute. The specification of the service and a bid for funding are currently being drafted.

Please send responses to Professor John Thompson, School of English, Queen's University Belfast (J.Thompson@qub.ac.uk).

1. Would you use such a service?

YES [go to question 2]
NO [go to question 5]

2. What existing online digitised resources would you like to see included?

3. What digitised datasets that are currently offline would you like to
see included?

4. What printed resources would you would like to see digitised and
included?

5. Any other comments?

6. Please provide your name, institution, and email address:

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sun, 07/10/2011 - 2:12pm by .

"No woman, according to New York Mayor Jimmy Walker, was ever ruined by a book. But Christopher B. Krebs, a classics professor at Harvard, makes a strong case that an early ethnological monograph, written in the first century in Latin by the Roman historian Tacitus, may have warped the cultural identity of an entire nation. In my old Penguin translation, 'Germania'—'On Germany'— runs fewer than 40 pages, but, like other comparably short documents, such as the Declaration of Independence and 'The Communist Manifesto,' its influence has been earthshaking. As the Penguin translator, H. Mattingly, frankly writes in his 1947 introduction, the book is 'a detailed account of a great people that had already begun to be a European problem in the first century of our era.'"

Read more of the review of A Most Dangerous Book at The Washington Post online.

 
View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Thu, 07/07/2011 - 4:54pm by Information Architect.

The APA Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance (CAMP) seeks participants for its performance at the APA Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.  This year’s play is the premiere of The Jurymen, an Aristophanic take on the last days of Socrates, written by Katherine Janson, and directed by Amy R. Cohen.  We need actors, musicians, stage crew, and helpers for our limited-rehearsal staged reading.  Rehearsals will begin on Wednesday, January 4 and the performance will take place on the evening of Friday, January 6.  Send an e-mail describing your interests and talents to acohen@randolphcollege.edu, by September 1, 2011.  Read the script at apollonejournal.org.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 07/07/2011 - 3:16pm by Adam Blistein.

The Joint Committee on Placement and APA Staff are developing a system that will bring greater automation to the process of registering candidates and institutions for the Service and of scheduling interviews at the 2012 Joint Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.  We hope to have this system in place by the beginning of September.  While this new system is being developed, the Service will operate in the following manner:

For candidates:  Placement Director Renie Plonski will send an e-mail to all candidates registered for last year’s Service (2010-2011) stating that, unless they wish to discontinue their subscriptions, they will continue to receive e-mails around the 1st and 15th of each month containing all position listings recently submitted to the Service.  Any new candidate who wishes to receive the semi-monthly e-mails may be added to the e-mail list at no charge by submitting that request to Renie (plonskii@sas.upenn.edu).  Note:  Once the new automated system is implemented, we will no longer use this interim e-mail list.  All candidates wishing to participate in the 2011-2012 Service will need to register for it and pay the required fee. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 07/07/2011 - 2:37pm by Adam Blistein.

"Two years ago, an archivist at Tufts University was sifting through manuscripts in the library's special collections when he came across a lone, unlabeled folder. To his surprise, it contained a stack of documents that no one then at the library had ever seen, some of them dating back to the 12th century. The Tisch Library Miscellany Collection was born. Now, Marie-Claire A. Beaulieu, an assistant professor of classics, has a novel way of identifying the documents and translating them from Latin to English—she's having her students do it. The 15 undergraduates and graduates she enlisted became historical sleuths, opening the cold case of the centuries-old texts; their work has been published online in the project's digital archive." Read more at The Chronicle of Higher Education online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 07/07/2011 - 12:51pm by Information Architect.

From the website of Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford:

Everyone at LMH was deeply saddened by the death of Dr Simon Price on 14 June 2011. Simon was a distinguished scholar, and a much appreciated teacher to generations of students in Ancient History and in Classical Archaeology. He continued researching and writing after he had taken early retirement in 2008. He was able to complete The Birth of Classical Europe, written in collaboration with Peter Thonemann, which has recently been published in paperback by Penguin.

Simon’s funeral will be on Thursday 23 June at 2.45pm in St Margaret’s Church, 19 St Margaret’s Road, Oxford, OX2 6RX. All are welcome.  

The family has asked people not to send flowers for the funeral but if anyone would like to make a donation in Simon’s memory to do so for the Ancient History Fellowship at LMH. This was Simon's wish.

Cheques, made payable to ‘LMH Development Fund’ and marked ‘Simon Price’ should be sent to the Development Office, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, OX2 6QA.  Donations may also be made online.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 07/06/2011 - 3:52pm by .

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Joseph O’Neill and Adam Rigoni of Arizona State University are seeking abstra
SCS Announcements
New to being an Affiliated Group this year, the Multiculturalism, Race &

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy