CFP: NACGLE 2020 - Inscriptions and the Epigraphic Habit

NACGLE 2020


The 3rd North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy

“Inscriptions and the Epigraphic Habit”

January 5-7, 2020
Washington DC

Call for papers:

The third North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy will be held January 5-7, 2020, in Washington, D.C., under the aegis of the American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (ASGLE), and with support from Georgetown University.

The congress will be held immediately following the Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Society for Classical Studies in Washington DC (January 2-5, 2020), and will include thematic panels on a variety of topics, a poster session, and possible excursions. We invite papers that present epigraphy related to the ancient world from the archaic period through late antiquity.

The congress organizing committee is pleased to invite individual abstracts for the parallel sessions (for papers of 20 minutes) and for the poster session.

Panels may be devoted some of the following themes:

The epigraphic habit, inscribed instrumenta, late antiquity, monuments and identity, religion, magic, the ancient city, the family in antiquity, ancient graffiti, curse tablets, slavery, writer and audience, text and context, literacy, and newly discovered or edited texts.

Abstracts:

Abstracts of ca. 350-500 words, or no more than 1 page, should be submitted anonymously (i.e. without your name on the attachment) by email attachment in PDF or Word document form by Wednesday, March 1, 2019 to the congress email address at NACGLE2020@gmail.com. Abstracts will be reviewed by the members of the congress organizing committee and the results of the review process will be made known to potential participants after April 15, 2019.

Posters:

Information about submission requirements for the poster session are forthcoming and will be published soon. Abstracts for posters will be due on September 1, 2019.

The opening night reception on January 5, 2019 will be held at the Center for Hellenic Studies. 

Washington DC is itself a particularly epigraphically-rich city, with public, inscribed monuments ranging from the Vietnam Wall to the Lincoln Memorial, as well as the Library of Congress. The city is served by three airports: Washington Dulles (IAD, the major international airport), Washington Reagan National (DCA, a smaller airport on the metro line), and Baltimore-Washington (BWI, a bit further away, but sometimes has less expensive flights).

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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We are writing for two reasons. First, we reiterate the statement of 1/6/19, authored and approved by the Board of Directors in San Diego. There is no place for racism in our field and we feel that is important to reissue that statement, given the increasing toxicity of online debate and the intensification of online harassment over the last few days:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 03/04/2019 - 9:04am by Helen Cullyer.

Enlightenment: Paideia and Politics

The International Conference of Philosophy is organized every year by the Olympic Center for Philosophy and Culture in collaboration with the Region of Western Greece in Ancient Olympia, Greece. The XXVIII World Philosophy Conference will be held in Ancient Olympia, Greece, from July 5 to July 7, 2019.

The 28th International Conference of Philosophy is dedicated to the memory of Leonidas Bargeliotes, Emeritus Professor and Honorary President, and Sotiris Fournaros, Faculty member of Philosophy, Pedagogy and Psychology, Department of Philosophy, University of Athens, who both recently passed away. The aims of the 2019 Conference include an emphasis on exploring Enlightenment.

We welcome submissions from a wide range of disciplines, including politics, law, education/paideia, life sciences, and philosophy as well as philosophy and fine arts, and/or other relevant disciplines and fields.

Suggested Thematic Units:

  • Ancient Greek Enlightenment
  • Neoehellenic Enlightenment
  • European Enlightenment
  • Enlightenment and Religion
  • Enlightenment and Culture
  • Enlightenment and Postmodernism
  • Ancient Greek Theatre

Deadlines:

April 30, 2019:  Abstract is due (300-500 words)

May 31, 2019: Full Paper is due (2.500 words)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 03/01/2019 - 11:42am by Erik Shell.
Perseus and Andromeda in landscape fresco Metropolitan Museum_public domain

The Scaife Viewer of the Perseus Project pursues a simple goal: to provide a clear and enjoyable reading experience of the Greek and Latin texts and translations of the Perseus Digital Library. It is the first installment of Perseus 5.0 and eventually will replace Perseus’ current interface, Perseus Hopper, as the primary means for accessing the texts and translations of the Perseus library. In its goal to simplify access to Perseus’ repository of texts, the Scaife Viewer is a success. Its layout is uncluttered, its texts legible, its design refreshing. As a result, the Scaife Viewer is a welcome re-imagining of how users read Perseus texts.

Since it is primarily a redesign of the Perseus interface, the Scaife Viewer’s interventions are both functional and aesthetic. Gone are the floating grey text-boxes, the blurry title card, the distracting Unicode-Betacode display preferences, and the rows of patchwork, horizontal browsing bars. The homepage presents the user with two options: Browse Library and Text Search.

Splash screen of Perseus Scaife viewer

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 03/01/2019 - 10:42am by Stephen Andrew Sansom.

(Posted, with permission, from Meaningful Funerals)

Dr. John C. Traupman, of Penn Valley / Narberth, PA., a World War II veteran, University Professor, author of translation dictionaries of languages in Latin and German to English, and a prolific author of may Latin related subjects, died on February 18, 2019 at the Bryn Mawr Hospital. He was 96. His wife Pauline Temmel Traupman, whom he was married to for 70 years, died on December 7, 2018.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Thu, 02/28/2019 - 8:49am by Erik Shell.

The Society for Classical Studies would like to clarify that the Society's Committee on Professional Ethics has not censured Prof. Sarah Bond. More details will be forthcoming later.

Helen Cullyer, Executive Director

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/27/2019 - 9:49am by Helen Cullyer.

The new Classics Everywhere initiative, recently launched by the SCS, supports projects that seek to introduce and engage communities all over the US with the worlds of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. During the first round of applications, the SCS funded 13 projects, ranging from performances and a cinema series to educational programs and inter-institutional collaborations. In celebration of Black History Month, we’d like to highlight four of the projects funded in this round which aim to shed light on African-Americans’ interaction with the Greek and Roman worlds.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/25/2019 - 6:00am by Nina Papathanasopoulou.

From time to time, T.H.M. Gellar-Goad will be checking in with a member of the discipline to see how they conceptualize or define “productivity” in their own work and in the profession. We’ll ask them the same set of five questions and share their responses, plus perhaps a photo or two from their experiences. These Perspectives on Productivity will present views from a diverse cross-section of our field, people from all sorts of backgrounds, working in all sorts of areas, and at all sorts of stages in their Classics-related journeys. Today we hear from Lindsey Mazurek, Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University of Oregon.

What does “productivity” mean to you as a member of the discipline?

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 02/21/2019 - 9:28am by Lindsey Mazurek.

"Fly me to the moon" The moon in human imagination
University of Genova (Italy) December 12th-13th 2019

From October 2018 through December 2022, NASA will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Program that landed a dozen Americans on the moon between July 1969 and December 1972.

All kind of events, activities, exhibitions, seminars dedicated to celebrating the first moon landing are understandably spreading everywhere and we want to join the celebrations in our own way.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 02/20/2019 - 12:20pm by Erik Shell.

(Written by Meredith Hoppin, Department of Classics, Williams College)

Charles John Fuqua, Garfield Professor of Ancient Languages Emeritus at Williams College, died peacefully at his home in Williamstown, Massachusetts on 19 January 2019, his wife, three children, and grandchild at his side. He was 83 years old.

Charlie was born on 5 October 1935 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France and grew up in Arlington, Virginia. He attended Gonzaga College High School in Washington, D.C. and graduated from Princeton University in 1957. Charlie served in the U. S. Navy for three years and in the Naval Reserves for eight more, retiring as a Lieutenant Commander. While a graduate student at Cornell, where he studied with Gordon Kirkwood, Charlie met and married a fellow graduate student in Classics, Mary Louis Morse of Vermont. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1964 and teaching at Dartmouth for two years, in 1966 Charlie came to Williams to chair the Classics Department, which he did for the next twenty years. Charlie arrived at the college when it was just embarking on momentous changes, including expanding the size of the student body, admitting women, and recruiting a substantially more diverse set of faculty, staff, and students. Charlie participated actively in ensuring the success of these changes, within the department and throughout the college.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 02/20/2019 - 11:50am by Erik Shell.

Like many others, I'm trying to funnel the anger and frustration that I felt at our panel on the "Future of Classics" at the Annual Meeting in San Diego toward taking action that can make a difference, even on a small scale.  At the panel Professor Sarah Bond and Professor Dan-el Padilla Peralta promptly condemned the comments a speaker from the audience made about Dan-el as well as her intellectually and politically regressive defense of classical studies.   My thoughts here are intended to carry forward their energetic advocacy. 

To combat racist attitudes and assumptions that persist not only at the margins of the field but among and around us, we must act now on our home campuses and schools.  Here are five ideas to get us started.  There are many more.  It’s important to note that at some schools, faculty and students are already acting on these ideas or better versions of them.  They arise from my experience as a university administrator, where I've seen countless discussions about diversity go in circles until faculty, students, and staff commit together to do specific things within a short time frame.  They are designed for use at college and university campuses, the world I know best, but K-12 teachers and scholars are included here, and I welcome ideas from this crucially important sector of our field. 

Ideas for action in the coming 30-60 days 
 

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 02/15/2019 - 7:16am by Joy Connolly.

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