CFP: NACGLE 2020 - Inscriptions and the Epigraphic Habit

NACGLE 2020


The 3rd North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy

“Inscriptions and the Epigraphic Habit”

January 5-7, 2020
Washington DC

Call for papers:

The third North American Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy will be held January 5-7, 2020, in Washington, D.C., under the aegis of the American Society of Greek and Latin Epigraphy (ASGLE), and with support from Georgetown University.

The congress will be held immediately following the Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Society for Classical Studies in Washington DC (January 2-5, 2020), and will include thematic panels on a variety of topics, a poster session, and possible excursions. We invite papers that present epigraphy related to the ancient world from the archaic period through late antiquity.

The congress organizing committee is pleased to invite individual abstracts for the parallel sessions (for papers of 20 minutes) and for the poster session.

Panels may be devoted some of the following themes:

The epigraphic habit, inscribed instrumenta, late antiquity, monuments and identity, religion, magic, the ancient city, the family in antiquity, ancient graffiti, curse tablets, slavery, writer and audience, text and context, literacy, and newly discovered or edited texts.

Abstracts:

Abstracts of ca. 350-500 words, or no more than 1 page, should be submitted anonymously (i.e. without your name on the attachment) by email attachment in PDF or Word document form by Wednesday, March 1, 2019 to the congress email address at NACGLE2020@gmail.com. Abstracts will be reviewed by the members of the congress organizing committee and the results of the review process will be made known to potential participants after April 15, 2019.

Posters:

Information about submission requirements for the poster session are forthcoming and will be published soon. Abstracts for posters will be due on September 1, 2019.

The opening night reception on January 5, 2019 will be held at the Center for Hellenic Studies. 

Washington DC is itself a particularly epigraphically-rich city, with public, inscribed monuments ranging from the Vietnam Wall to the Lincoln Memorial, as well as the Library of Congress. The city is served by three airports: Washington Dulles (IAD, the major international airport), Washington Reagan National (DCA, a smaller airport on the metro line), and Baltimore-Washington (BWI, a bit further away, but sometimes has less expensive flights).

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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We are in the process of transferring the web site for the placement service to a new host. The site will be down for a while. We'll post an update when it is back up and ready to use.

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From the Baylor Lariat:

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Read the rest of the story here.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 03/04/2012 - 3:35pm by Information Architect.

The APA web site now contains our audited financial statements for the fiscal year that ended on June 30, 2011, and the Executive Director's report for the year ending December 31, 2011.  I apologize for the delay in submitting the latter report.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 02/24/2012 - 8:18pm by Adam Blistein.

From CNN.com:

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 02/17/2012 - 9:36pm by Information Architect.

Inside Higher Ed's academic minute today features APA member Barbara Gold speaking on the subject of love in ancient Rome. Listen to the audio clip at http://www.insidehighered.com/audio/2012/02/14/love-ancient-rome.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 02/14/2012 - 3:01pm by Information Architect.

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Listen to the story at npr.org.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 02/08/2012 - 2:06am by Information Architect.

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The APA Unicode fonts AtticaU, BosporosU, KadmosU, which are a part of GreekKeys 2008, now have styled versions (italic, bold, and bold italic) to accompany the regular typeface previously available.

Formerly, almost any computer application that was capable of displaying text could also display styled versions of a font by modifying a regular version installed on the system. In recent years, some advanced programs have been designed so that they no longer create such styles on the fly, but instead will apply a style to a font only if there is a separate styled version of the font installed on the system. MS Word still behaves in the old way and is content with only a regular version. Programs like Pages, Mellel, and InDesign adopt the new approach and require styled versions.

The characters of the APA fonts have now been reprocessed in FontLab Studio to create AtticaU Italic, AtticaU Bold, AtticaU Bold Italic, BosporosU Italic, BosporosU Bold, BosporosU Bold Italic, KadmosU Italic, KadmosU Bold, KadmosU Bold Italic alongside AtticU Regular, BosporosU Regular, and KadmosU Regular.

Anyone who is interested and holds a license to GreekKeys 2008 is invited to email djmastronarde at berkeley dot edu to receive instructions for downloading the new styled versions of these fonts. Feedback is welcome.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/31/2012 - 1:24am by .

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