CFP: Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

The Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

International Online Conference

14th  May 2021

Organised by  Classical Students Association of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Call for Papers

Nature and the climate are one of the essential factors affecting the lives of societies, shaping their culture, economy and politics. Both today and in the ancient world, natural conditions have forced permanent changes to the social structure and the way in which reality is treated, shaping a specific relationship between people and their natural environment. The message and the lessons we can draw from climate observation was understood by ancient authors, such as Pliny the Elder, to say in his Natural History that 'there is a general consensus in agriculture that nothing can be done too late; and again, that everything must be done in good time; but there is a third principle that reminds us that lost opportunities can never be recovered'. (XVIII, sec. 44) In the surrounding nature, the Ancients therefore sought the idea of transformation and eternal rights. Nature and weather phenomena being at the centre of life of ancient, agrarian societies therefore performed an important function, shaping the culture, which is visible in the analysis of ancient texts.
The relationship of the ancient people to the climate and the influence of nature on human life in past times raises many diverse questions. The conference organised by us aims to create a field for discussion on these issues, taking the narrations of ancient writers as a starting point. Special attention will be paid to the following issues:

    -The terms κλίματα, φύσις in classical literature

    - Vegetarianism and the attitude of the Ancients to animals

    - Historical ecology in ancient times

    - The term οἶκος and nature economics

    - Climate semiotics in ancient writings

    - Climate and nature as a canvas for literature

    - The seasons in Greek and Roman poetry

    - The ancient beginnings of species systematics

    - Climatic catastrophes in the antient narrative

    - Climate as a divine force - mythological expansion of phenomena

- Ionian philosophy of nature

- The human body and nature

 - Ancient agrarian cultures

- Climate and state formation

- Nature as a functional metaphor in literature

- Necros and death, or man as an element of nature

 We address our invitation to all young researchers: classical philologists, historians, philosophers and representatives of various disciplines in the humanities.

The conference will be held online. Participation is free.

Please send the abstracts (up to 300 words) with short biographical note to the following e-mail address: antiquity.nature.conference@gmail.com. Submission deadline:  28 March 2021

More information at: https://antiquitynatureconference.wordpress.com/

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