CFP: Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

The Perception of Climate and Nature in Ancient Societies

International Online Conference

14th  May 2021

Organised by  Classical Students Association of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Call for Papers

Nature and the climate are one of the essential factors affecting the lives of societies, shaping their culture, economy and politics. Both today and in the ancient world, natural conditions have forced permanent changes to the social structure and the way in which reality is treated, shaping a specific relationship between people and their natural environment. The message and the lessons we can draw from climate observation was understood by ancient authors, such as Pliny the Elder, to say in his Natural History that 'there is a general consensus in agriculture that nothing can be done too late; and again, that everything must be done in good time; but there is a third principle that reminds us that lost opportunities can never be recovered'. (XVIII, sec. 44) In the surrounding nature, the Ancients therefore sought the idea of transformation and eternal rights. Nature and weather phenomena being at the centre of life of ancient, agrarian societies therefore performed an important function, shaping the culture, which is visible in the analysis of ancient texts.
The relationship of the ancient people to the climate and the influence of nature on human life in past times raises many diverse questions. The conference organised by us aims to create a field for discussion on these issues, taking the narrations of ancient writers as a starting point. Special attention will be paid to the following issues:

    -The terms κλίματα, φύσις in classical literature

    - Vegetarianism and the attitude of the Ancients to animals

    - Historical ecology in ancient times

    - The term οἶκος and nature economics

    - Climate semiotics in ancient writings

    - Climate and nature as a canvas for literature

    - The seasons in Greek and Roman poetry

    - The ancient beginnings of species systematics

    - Climatic catastrophes in the antient narrative

    - Climate as a divine force - mythological expansion of phenomena

- Ionian philosophy of nature

- The human body and nature

 - Ancient agrarian cultures

- Climate and state formation

- Nature as a functional metaphor in literature

- Necros and death, or man as an element of nature

 We address our invitation to all young researchers: classical philologists, historians, philosophers and representatives of various disciplines in the humanities.

The conference will be held online. Participation is free.

Please send the abstracts (up to 300 words) with short biographical note to the following e-mail address: antiquity.nature.conference@gmail.com. Submission deadline:  28 March 2021

More information at: https://antiquitynatureconference.wordpress.com/

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 09/22/2021 - 10:31am by Erik Shell.

Deadline Extension

We've extended the deadline for the SCS Outreach Prize to September 27, 2021.

The annual Outreach Prize of the Society for Classical Studies (SCS), a prize of $300, recognizes an outstanding project or program by an SCS member or members that makes available and accessible an aspect of classical antiquity to an audience other than Classics scholars or students at their home institutions.

You can send nomination materials to the Executive Director at xd@classicalstudies.org

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 09/21/2021 - 2:39pm by Erik Shell.

Experiencing Space: Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Ages VIII

Tampere, August 17-19, 2022 (in person/hybrid conference)

The focus of the Passages conference series lies on society and the history of everyday life. This time we are concentrating on the social construction and experiences of space, aiming to understand how it affected social frameworks, built communities and shaped individual lives. The “Spatial Turn” has directed scholars’ interest towards the interconnection between communities, individuals and space, but larger comparisons between eras and cultures are still mainly missing. We aim to approach space as an analytical tool, “experience” offering a novel conceptual method for the study in this field.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 09/21/2021 - 1:07pm by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers:

Horror vacui: Fear of Space in the Ancient World

Biennial Classics Graduate Student Conference

Conducted virtually via Zoom

New York University

November 5th, 2021

Keynote: Amy Russell (Brown University)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 4:18pm by Erik Shell.
A tan piece of paper with a pencil drawing of part of a double helix shape, comprised of lines and circles

One of the things that makes Classics exciting is its openness to new ideas and innovative approaches to the study of antiquity. For instance, classicists have been in the vanguard of the digital humanities, using new methods to curate and analyze texts (e.g. TLG, DLL, Open Greek and Latin, and so on), inscriptions (EAGLE, PHI), and papyri (papyri.info), adopting innovative GIS technologies and platforms (Pleiades, Orbis), and deploying powerful tools to unlock precious fragments of lost works. Classical archaeologists, too, have a particularly strong tradition of openness to new tools and techniques, from isotope geochemistry in the study of ancient marble to novel ways of cataloguing and quantifying material and visualizing ancient structures and sites. Vibrant subfields like bioarchaeology and zooarchaeology are inherently interdisciplinary. More broadly, ideas and approaches informed by anthropology, economics, and psychology have enriched the study of antiquity for decades.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 12:54pm by .

Res Difficiles 2022

Organizers:              Hannah Čulík-Baird (Boston University) and

Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)

Date:                          Friday, May 20, 2022

Abstract Deadline:  Friday, December 3, 2021

Platform:                    Webinar

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/20/2021 - 12:24pm by Erik Shell.
A black krater vase with red-figure depicts Zeus caressing Io while Hermes slays Argus

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 111 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 11 countries, including Canada, UK, Italy, Greece, Spain, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

This post centers on two projects that employ Greek and Roman literature in innovative ways to deal with contemporary issues. The first project draws inspiration from Euripides’ Trojan Women to facilitate the expression and sharing of intense experiences between students in the University of California and female prisoners, while the second project adapts Ovid’s Metamorphoses in a one-woman show that explores the role of women in our post #MeToo era.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/16/2021 - 11:35am by .

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

A virtual symposium hosted by the Gallatin School of Individualize Study

Ancient queens established a powerful public presence through visual and material culture, and their legacies continue to shape and impact the ways we express ideas about race, gender, and identity.

QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT is an interdisciplinary, virtual symposium hosted by NYU Gallatin on September 23-24, 2021. This symposium integrates scholarly and creative knowledge production from different perspectives that broaden the stakes and widen the impact of historical work. The symposium will model collaborative, critical, and public approaches to history and art by including the expertise of students, artists, performers, and educators beyond the university alongside the work of scholars and curators. Spanning two days, the symposium comprises seven panel discussions, five keynote talks, one performance, and an interactive website featuring public engagement, student work, and more.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 12:03pm by Erik Shell.

Multiple Explanations in the Ancient Greek and Roman World

Virtual seminar series, 2021-2022

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 10:19am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers: 

XR and the Humanities: Virtual Education in the 21st Century

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/15/2021 - 9:16am by Erik Shell.

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