CFP: Pindar in Sicily

Pindar in Sicily
An Academic Conference and Tour of Ancient Sites
 
Exedra Mediterranean Center
Syracuse, Sicily, 14-18 October , 2019

Even a cursory look at the remaining corpus of Pindar's victory odes leaves one in no doubt about the wealth, power, and prestige of his Sicilian patrons. Exactly a third of the odes were composed for Sicilian athletic victories, all but three in the more illustrious of the four Panhellenic contests (Olympian and Pythian), and almost all of them for single horse or chariot races, which required significantly more expenditure than any of the other athletic competitions. The odes to the ruling families of Deinomeniadai and Emmenidai (Hieron of Syracuse and Theron and Xenokrates of Akragas) are the most numerous and have long been considered among the most beautiful, sophisticated, and memorable ancient Greek poetry. It is thus not surprising that recent scholarship has focused on Pindar's special relationship with Sicily in the context of Sicilian social, political, and cultural climate in the fifth century BCE (Morgan (2015), Nicholson (2015), Lewis (forthcoming). On the other hand, surprisingly few scholars of Pindar and the historical context in which he worked have ever been to Sicily to see the hometowns of Pindar's patrons, where the songs would most likely have premiered in elaborate public performances, and which figure prominently in all of his compositions. The goal of this conference is to bring scholars from a variety of disciplines to Siracusa to discuss these odes and to visit the archaeological remains of the places and people they celebrate.

Our conference will take place at the Exedra Mediterranean Center, adjacent to the Piazza Duomo on Ortigia, the ancient heart of Syracuse.  It will include academic presentations as well as Pindar-themed visits to the Neapolis archeological park and Paolo Orsi museum.  We will also enjoy traditional Sicilian hospitality, with group dinners and catered lunches featuring local specialties.  At the conclusion of the conference, an optional tour of relevant sites will visit Kamarina, Gela, the site and museum of Agrigento (Akragas), the site and museum of Himera, and the general area of ancient Aetna on the slopes of Mount Etna.

The official languages of the conference are English, Italian, and Greek.  Proposals for presentations related to any aspect of Pindar in Sicily are welcome.  Abstracts for papers should be 150-300 words in length and prepared for blind review.  Proposals for panel discussions or creative presentations should include contact information for all participants.  Presentation times range from 20 minutes for individual papers to 90 minutes for panel discussions.  The proceedings will be published by Parnassos Press. 

Please send abstracts and direct questions to Heather L. Reid at fontearetusa1@gmail.com  Abstracts received by April 15, 2019 will be considered for early acceptance.  Final deadline for abstracts is July 15, 2019.

We look forward to welcoming you to in beautiful Syracuse, the heart of Western Greece.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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Of the slew of Disney’s new live-action remakes, perhaps the most anticipated release was this summer’s The Lion King, directed by Jon Favreau. After all, the original 1994 version was arguably the crown jewel of the ‘Disney Renaissance’, enjoying massive commercial and critical success (followed by a highly successful Broadway production). More importantly - at least for those like me who grew up in the 90’s - it was a cultural touchstone, a perennial source of references, parodies, and praise.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 10:00pm by Colin MacCormack.

The following members were elected in the ballot held this Summer. They take office in January 2020, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.  Thank you to all SCS members who agreed to stand for election this year.

President-Elect

Shelley P. Haley

Vice President for Communications and Outreach

Alison Futrell

Goodwin Committee

Harriet Flower

Nominating Committee

Toph Marshall

Patrice Rankine

Program Committee

Melissa Mueller

Carlos Noreña

Directors

John Gruber-Miller

Jennifer Sheridan Moss

Professional Ethics Statement Amendment

Passed

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 9:40am by Erik Shell.

Please join us for the 37th Classical Association of New England Summer Institute On the theme “The Empire and the Individual”

July 13-18, 2020 / Brown University, Providence, RI
graduate credit available

The organizers of the CANE Summer Institute invite you to join us for a weeklong examination of peoples and cultures that comprised the Classical Greek and Roman worlds. We will consider what it meant to be (but) an individual amid the greater whole of an empire and what that can tell us about living in today’s world.

Whether you are a high school or college teacher of Latin and/or Greek, History, English, the Arts, or other related disciplines, an undergraduate or graduate student, or a devoted lifelong learner, you will enjoy a thoughtful and enriching experience that includes a wide variety of mini-courses, lectures, workshops, reading groups, and special events while also offering many opportunities for conversation and collegial interaction among participants

This summer’s 5-day mini-courses include:

He Longed for the Desert: Turning Your Back on Rome  John Higgins, Smith College

Romans and Italians: Empire-Making before the Social War Sailakshmi Ramgopal, Columbia University

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 9:24am by Erik Shell.

Making Classics Public

A panel with Prof. Sarah Bond (University of Iowa) and Dr. Donna Zuckerberg (Editor-in-Chief, Eidolon)

Friday October 18
3:30-5:00 PM | Kresge 1515

Northwestern University,1880 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 

Part of #ClassicsNow: The Urgency of Re-Imagining Antiquity series

Making Classics Public is co-sponsored by the Society for Classical Studies

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(Photo from Northwestern University, used with permission)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 8:38am by Erik Shell.
The Society for Ancient Studies (SAS)—an interdisciplinary graduate student organization at New York University —is hosting its second-annual one-day undergraduate conference on the ancient world on Friday, February 7th, 2020 in Manhattan. This conference, organized and moderated by graduate students for talented and motivated undergraduates, will offer participants the opportunity to present their scholarship in the engaged professional setting of an academic conference. 

Participants will be expected to present a 15-minute paper to a forum of their undergraduate peers, graduate students, and NYU faculty. Submissions may be a condensed version, or a particularly strong chapter, of an undergraduate thesis, an exceptional course paper, or an independent research project. We welcome work informed by any and all theories and methodologies, and encourage submission from students working in any discipline (e.g. Classical Philology, Anthropology, Archaeology, History, etc.) or geo-temporal focus (e.g. Mediterranean and Atlantic Studies; Egyptology; Pre-Columbian, Near East, and East Asian Civilizations).

Food will be provided to all participants, and any audio-visual necessities will be arranged. Some local travel reimbursements will also be available.

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: Friday, November 22nd, 2019

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 09/17/2019 - 10:03am by Erik Shell.

The Classical Association of Ghana

2nd International Classics Conference in Ghana (ICCG)
8th to 11th October 2020

University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana

Theme: Global Classics and Africa: Past, Present, and Future

The late 1950s and early 1960s ushered in a period when many African countries were gaining political independence. Immediately, there was an agenda to unite African nations, and a policy of Africanization began to gain ground. In the area of education, this Africanization process was vigorously pursued. In Ghana the Institute of African Studies was established, and an Encyclopaedia Africana project, originally conceived by W. E. B. DuBois, was revived. In Nigeria, new universities were established to counter the colonial-based education that was present at the University of Ibadan, and in some East African countries there were fears that foreign university teachers would not be able to further the Africanization of university education.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/16/2019 - 1:52pm by Erik Shell.

Honor and Shame in Classical Antiquity

Thirteenth Annual Graduate Conference in Classics
Friday, March 20, 2020
The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Keynote Speaker: Margaret Graver, Dartmouth College

Virtue, Cicero argues, seeks no other reward for its labors and dangers beyond that of praise and glory. From the earliest days of the ancient Mediterranean, the pursuit of honor and avoidance of shame have shaped societies’ value systems. Achilles wages war according to a strict honor code, while Hesiod’s personified goddess, Shame, is the last to depart the earth as a rebuke of humanity’s wickedness. Far from belonging to the static code of an aristocratic warrior class, as was once understood, honor and shame are increasingly seen as part of a complex and polyvalent ethical system. They manifest themselves not only in the heroic self-assertion of ancient epic but also in a variety of other arenas, such as, for example, philosophical treatises, gender relations and sexual mores, the lives of enslaved peoples, Athenian law and politics, the performance of Roman state identity, and religious belief.  Thus they are pervasive throughout literature, thought, and society in the ancient world.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/16/2019 - 9:57am by Erik Shell.

High school Latin programs (along with Classics programs at the college or university level) are in perpetual peril, and keeping any program alive contributes to the ongoing effort to keep our field afloat and relevant, while also continuing to provide students with all of the benefits that we know that Latin offers. Monmouth College’s Classics Department spearheaded a successful, broad-based effort to resist the proposed elimination of the thriving Latin program at Monmouth-Roseville (IL) High School (MRHS) in Spring 2019.

This reflection is meant as a case study for understanding and then addressing the issue of threatened Latin programs across the country. I will lay out the factors and steps that led to the initial decision to drop the program, those that we discovered were critical in the eventual success of the resistance effort, and roles that a college or university Classics programs can play to retain their comrade programs, which cultivate many eventual Classics students and majors. 


Figure 1: Monmouth-Roseville High School in Monmouth, IL. Photo Credit: Robert Holschuh Simmons.

Background on the situation at Monmouth-Roseville 

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/12/2019 - 8:49pm by Robert Holschuh Simmons.

Sailing with the Gods: Religion and Maritime Mobility in the Ancient World

           Sponsored by: The Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions

           Location: Grand Hotel Excelsior, Floriana, Malta

           Dates: June 17-21, 2020

           Ritual practices dedicated to maritime success appear across a wide span of human cultural history, from the Mediterranean to the North Sea, Southeast Asia across the Pacific to the west coast of the Americas. Culturally-constructed seafaring rituals could be seen as spiritual or superstitious, and respond to the combination of risk and profit endemic in even short voyages by water. Maritime religion infuses all water-borne contact across cultural boundaries; the crafts of those who build rafts, canoes, and sailing vessels; navigational skills which may reach back to ancestors who have faded into cultural legend; and myriad mnemonic and naming strategies extending to littoral markers and celestial patterns. Mythic and ritual responses are accordingly complex, ranging from apotropaia to the divine authorization of civic structures, shipboard shrines and functional epithets which could link divinities, heroes and nearly-deified rulers to the control of the waves and winds.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/09/2019 - 2:33pm by Erik Shell.

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