CFP: Politics of Empire in the Roman Republic

The Politics of Empire in the Roman Republic: The Forum Unbounded (280 BCE – 20 CE)

Keynote Speaker: Professor Arthur Eckstein, University of Maryland

Georgetown University’s Villa Le Balze, Fiesole, Italy
29 April – 2 May 2020

The growth of Roman power across the Mediterranean, as well as the shape it took, was dictated by debates, elections, and spectacles in the city of Rome.  But interactions in ever-shifting borderlands – among local populations and their leaders, Roman generals and armies, senatorial envoys, subcontractors, traders, translators, and more – were equally important.  “Imperial politics,” historian Charles Maier has written, “…originates from the outside in as well as proceeding from the center out” (Among Empires, p. 78).

While recent studies have offered radically new visions of the politics of the Roman Republic and the development of its imperium alike, there is an opportunity to look more closely at the two in conjunction.  How did actors and institutions both in Rome and beyond shape particular decisions (e.g., to go to war, to make peace) as well as long-term trends?  How did politics in the Forum as well as ‘borderlands’ influence the growth of Roman authority in specific regions, such as the Iberian Peninsula, the Celtic world, and the Balkans?  How could individuals acting outside of Rome circumvent decisions made in Rome?  How did those critical of Roman imperium, or aspects of it, resist it – militarily, diplomatically, intellectually – and help to reform it and influence Roman thinking?  

This conference aims to provide a forum for new research and scholarly argument on the role of empire as a catalyst in Roman politics and political institutions – and also the way transactions and interactions both inside Rome and far beyond shaped Roman imperium at particular moments in time.  We welcome papers that offer new interpretations of familiar episodes, challenge established narratives, and reframe chronology and establish the importance of developments in this period for later Roman history.

Papers will be given at Villa Le Balze in Fiesole, Italy, 29 April – 2 May, 2020.  Built in 1912 in the Renaissance style as a private residence and now a study center for Georgetown University, the Villa sits just below the ancient settlement of Fiesole and enjoys spectacular views of Florence as well as beautiful hillside gardens.  Participants will dine together at the Villa and will stay there or in a guest house in Fiesole.  A one-day excursion is also planned as part of the conference.

Abstracts should be 300 words maximum, for 30-minute papers to be delivered in English.  The deadline for submissions is 31 August 2019.  Questions may be sent to any or all of the organizers: Joel Allen (jallen@gc.cuny.edu); Kit Morrell (kit.morrell@sydney.edu.au); Josiah Osgood (jo39@georgetown.edu); Kathryn Welch (kathryn.welch@sydney.edu.au).  Proposals should be sent to Josiah Osgood (jo39@georgetown.edu).

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The Classical Association of the Atlantic States
Call for Papers: 2020 Annual Meeting, October 8-10, 2020

Hotel DuPont, Wilmington, DE

We invite individual and group proposals on all aspects of the classical world and classical reception, and on new strategies and resources for improved teaching.  Especially welcome are presentations that aim at maximum audience participation and integrate the concerns of K-12 and college faculty, that consider ways of communicating about ancient Greece and Rome beyond our discipline and profession, and that reflect on the past, present, and future of classical studies in the CAAS region.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/13/2020 - 8:44am by Erik Shell.

Hybrid Epicenters: Peripheral Adaptation in Flavian Literature

With a response by Antony Augoustakis

Adaptation and change in Imperial Rome tend to aggregate on the margins and at the edges of things, in extremis as it were. In Flavian literature, various dynamic changes have been observed, in the textual space as well as in the socio-political background under which this literature is being produced. One example is the sudden transition between books 11 and 12 in Statius’ Thebaid wherein the fraternas acies of the first 11 books gives way to (attempted) reconciliation. Or from a geographical stance, one example is Scipio Africanus’ rapid rise to power as he pushes Rome’s military might to her future imperial edges in Spain and North Africa in books 16 and 17 of the Punica; from a sociocultural angle, the complex dynamics in the Silvae between Campania and Rome causes difficulties in recognizing which location is central and which peripheral in Statius’ conceptualization of the geography of Roman power in Italy.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/11/2020 - 2:13pm by Erik Shell.

The following was approved by the SCS board of directors on February 7, 2020.

The Society for Classical Studies joins the Society of Architectural Historians in opposing the proposed Executive Order “Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again.”  As students and scholars of the ancient Greco-Roman world and its ongoing cultural impact, we recognize that classical antiquity provided some of the many traditions that have shaped this nation, and we appreciate the examples of neo-classical architecture, both public and private, to be found throughout the United States.  But we firmly believe that the architectural style of public buildings should not be dictated in advance, but rather freely and deliberately chosen in view of all relevant considerations, and we reject the supposition that a style derived from classical models is necessarily better suited than any other to express the history, values, and aspirations of the American people.

Please see the letter below from the Society of Architectural Historians and a number of other scholarly societies, including SCS.

February 10, 2020

The President
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20500

Re: Opposition to proposed Executive Order “Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again”

Dear Mr. President,

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Mon, 02/10/2020 - 11:49am by Helen Cullyer.

The deadline to apply for Classics Everywhere is February 14, 2020.

Applications can be submitted through the above link by filling out the application form linked half way down the page.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 02/10/2020 - 8:29am by Erik Shell.

TITLE: The Bridge

DESCRIPTION: Vocabulary building tool

URL: https://bridge.haverford.edu/

NAME: Mulligan, Bret in ongoing collaboration with Haverford College students

PUBLISHER: [none]

PLACE: Haverford College

COLLECTION TITLE (parent resource of the resource being described; collection of which the resource is a part): [none]

DATE CREATED: 2014-pres. (revisions and updates ongoing)

DATE ACCESSED: December 1, 2019

AVAILABILITY: Free

RIGHTS (license restrictions imposed on access to a resource): The Bridge and its byproducts are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

CLASSIFICATION: databases, dictionaries, Greek, language learning tools, language processing, Latin, linked open data, reference materials, texts.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 02/07/2020 - 6:37am by .

In 2020 the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) will again award the David D. and Rosemary H. Coffin Fellowship for study and travel in classical lands.

The Fellowship is intended to recognize secondary-school teachers of Greek or Latin who are as dedicated to their students as the Coffins themselves by giving them the opportunity to enrich their teaching and their lives through direct acquaintance with the classical world.  It will support study in classical lands (not limited to Greece and Italy); the recipient may use it to attend an educational program in (e.g. American Academy, American School) or to undertake an individual plan of study or research. It may be used either for summer study or during a sabbatical leave, and it may be used to supplement other awards or prizes.

For full details and instructions please visit the David D. and Rosemary H. Coffin Fellowship page. Materials must be received no later than February 27, 2020.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 02/04/2020 - 12:35pm by Erik Shell.

Cultural Identity in Political Rhetoric: Past and Present

Society for Classical Studies 2021 Annual Meeting – January 7-10, Chicago, IL

Organizer: Tedd A. Wimperis (twimperis@elon.edu)

Rhetorical appeals to ethnic or civic identity were a mainstay of political discourse in the ancient Mediterranean. Arguments from cultural heritage and mythical kinship between peoples supported diplomatic negotiation; orators invoked values and traditions inherited from past generations to sway audiences; autocrats wove their personal iconography into the fabric of the “national story” to legitimize and authorize their power. Politically-guided ideations of identity were promoted through literature, art, architecture, coinage, and various forms of performance, and relied on effective appropriations of cultural symbolism and myth. Here and now in our own modern world, these kinds of discourse remain entrenched in political communication, from the extremes of ethno-nationalism to the commonplaces of campaign rhetoric, where appeals to “who we are” and “what our values are” appear explicitly and subtly in televised debates and hearings, tweets, billboards, and bumper stickers.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/04/2020 - 8:47am by Erik Shell.

“Koinonia” in Plato’s Philosophy

March 8-12, 2021
Pontifical Catholic University of Peru
Lima, Peru

Plato uses the term “Koinonia” in a wide variety of important ways.  It signifies the relation of the forms with each other as well as the relation we can have with them, but also both relations between individual people and between individuals and the community as a whole.  Although this term has been the object of intense scholarly scrutiny, many issues remain to be explored.  We will consider abstracts on any aspect of the subject, including the metaphysical, epistemological, social, and ethical dimensions of koinonia.

Submission guidelines:

1. Please submit titles and abstracts of 500 words (maximum), double-spaced, 12 point type, formatted for anonymous review

2. Name, Paper Title, Affiliation, Postal Address, Email Address included as an attachment in the email to which the abstract is sent

3. Abstracts can be in any of the IPS’s official languages: English, Spanish, German, Italian, French

4. Abstracts Submission Deadline: July 31, 2020.

5. All abstracts must be sent with the subject "IPS Mid-Term Meeting" to the following address: cef@pucp.edu.pe

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 01/31/2020 - 8:58am by Erik Shell.

On January 5, 2020, the SCS Board of Directors approved a name change for the Minority Scholarship in Classics and Classics Archaeology. The scholarships will now be known as the Frank M. Snowden Jr. Undergraduate Scholarships. The name change was recommended by President-Elect Shelley P. Haley and the SCS Committee on Diversity in the Profession.

The new name honors Frank M. Snowden Jr., the renowned black classicist, chair for many years of the Howard Classics Department, and author of Blacks in Antiquity, which won the Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit in 1973. Prof. Snowden was also a recipient of the National Humanities Medal and was elected by the SCS (then APA) membership to the position of second Vice President, serving in that role in 1983-84. According to the cursus honorum at the time, Prof. Snowden should have become President in 1986. However, he had to step down owing to poor health, which was a huge loss to the organization and the profession. You can read a full biography of Professor Snowden here.   

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 01/30/2020 - 9:49am by Helen Cullyer.

The tale of Orpheus and Eurydice has long been a popular myth in music, drama, literature, and film. Anais Mitchell’s recent musical sensation Hadestown (which was workshopped from 2006 and had an off-Broadway debut during the 2017-18 season) is but one example of the reworking of the legendary love story. Although Mitchell’s musical is broadly defined as a folk opera, it is just the latest instance amongst many pop culture reinterpretations of the Orpheus myth across different musical genres. The tragic tale of a famed musician who traveled to the underworld to retrieve his love from the grips of death has inspired several musicians during the 1990s and the 2000s. Many of these retellings have engaged with one of the most important themes of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth: the power of music and art to provide salvation.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/30/2020 - 9:29am by .

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