CFP: Politics of Empire in the Roman Republic

The Politics of Empire in the Roman Republic: The Forum Unbounded (280 BCE – 20 CE)

Keynote Speaker: Professor Arthur Eckstein, University of Maryland

Georgetown University’s Villa Le Balze, Fiesole, Italy
29 April – 2 May 2020

The growth of Roman power across the Mediterranean, as well as the shape it took, was dictated by debates, elections, and spectacles in the city of Rome.  But interactions in ever-shifting borderlands – among local populations and their leaders, Roman generals and armies, senatorial envoys, subcontractors, traders, translators, and more – were equally important.  “Imperial politics,” historian Charles Maier has written, “…originates from the outside in as well as proceeding from the center out” (Among Empires, p. 78).

While recent studies have offered radically new visions of the politics of the Roman Republic and the development of its imperium alike, there is an opportunity to look more closely at the two in conjunction.  How did actors and institutions both in Rome and beyond shape particular decisions (e.g., to go to war, to make peace) as well as long-term trends?  How did politics in the Forum as well as ‘borderlands’ influence the growth of Roman authority in specific regions, such as the Iberian Peninsula, the Celtic world, and the Balkans?  How could individuals acting outside of Rome circumvent decisions made in Rome?  How did those critical of Roman imperium, or aspects of it, resist it – militarily, diplomatically, intellectually – and help to reform it and influence Roman thinking?  

This conference aims to provide a forum for new research and scholarly argument on the role of empire as a catalyst in Roman politics and political institutions – and also the way transactions and interactions both inside Rome and far beyond shaped Roman imperium at particular moments in time.  We welcome papers that offer new interpretations of familiar episodes, challenge established narratives, and reframe chronology and establish the importance of developments in this period for later Roman history.

Papers will be given at Villa Le Balze in Fiesole, Italy, 29 April – 2 May, 2020.  Built in 1912 in the Renaissance style as a private residence and now a study center for Georgetown University, the Villa sits just below the ancient settlement of Fiesole and enjoys spectacular views of Florence as well as beautiful hillside gardens.  Participants will dine together at the Villa and will stay there or in a guest house in Fiesole.  A one-day excursion is also planned as part of the conference.

Abstracts should be 300 words maximum, for 30-minute papers to be delivered in English.  The deadline for submissions is 31 August 2019.  Questions may be sent to any or all of the organizers: Joel Allen (jallen@gc.cuny.edu); Kit Morrell (kit.morrell@sydney.edu.au); Josiah Osgood (jo39@georgetown.edu); Kathryn Welch (kathryn.welch@sydney.edu.au).  Proposals should be sent to Josiah Osgood (jo39@georgetown.edu).

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The SCS Board is delighted to announce a new prize, which will be awarded for the first time in 2020. The Gruen Prize honors Erich S. Gruen, Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley.  It will be an essay prize for the best graduate student research on multiculturalism in the ancient Mediterranean, and submissions about any aspect of race, ethnicity, or cultural exchange will be considered. 
View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 12/31/2019 - 11:04am by Helen Cullyer.

The SCS is pleased to announce the appointment of Patrice Rankine and Sasha-Mae Eccleston as guest editors of a future issue of TAPA with the theme of race, racism, and Classics. A detailed call for papers will be issued in early 2020, and a timetable for submissions will be provided. This themed issue is likely to appear as TAPA 153:1 in spring 2023.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sun, 12/29/2019 - 7:32pm by Helen Cullyer.

SCS is pleased to be able to offer professional learning units (PLUs) to K-12 teachers in the District of Columbia who attend the AIA-SCS Annual Meeting from January 2-5 at the Marriott Marquis, Washington DC. Forms for PLUs will be available at the SCS booth in the exhibit hall.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 12/29/2019 - 7:12pm by Helen Cullyer.

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View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 12/27/2019 - 5:55am by Jeremy J. Swist.

The SCS Board is delighted to announce a new prize, which will be awarded for the first time in 2020. The Gruen Prize honors Erich S. Gruen, Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley.  It will be an essay prize for the best graduate student research on multiculturalism in the ancient Mediterranean, and submissions about any aspect of race, ethnicity, or cultural exchange will be considered. 

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 12/23/2019 - 9:53am by Helen Cullyer.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sat, 12/21/2019 - 7:03am by Helen Cullyer.

In November of 1897, a review of an English poetry collection titled The Flower of  the Mind was published in literary journal The Academy. In his review of Alice Meynell’s anthology of the great English poems, publisher Grant Richards ruminated on the difficulties, worth, and effects of anthologies as a genre:

Anthologies, these latter years, come thick as Vallombrosa…For the making of an anthology is not merely the prettiest of literary amusements, it is also a delicate and fine mode of criticism. To select is to judge; tacitly, but no less deliberately. Admission or exclusion becomes the last word of a patient investigation, in the course of which, tests for genius are devised, and many an established reputation fails to sustain the ordeal. A history of anthologies would be a curious chronicle of the slow but inevitable determination of greatness.

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View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 12/20/2019 - 8:12am by Sarah E. Bond.

Special tours for AIA / SCS: January 2, 2020, 3:00-5:00 pm
Woven Interiors: Furnishing Early Medieval Egypt and Cotsen Textile Traces Study Center
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW, Washington, D.C.

Woven Interiors (closing on Jan. 5), co-organized by The Textile Museum and Dumbarton Oaks, presents 45 exceptional interior textiles from the villas, palaces, churches, mosques, and humble homes of late antique and early medieval Egypt (300–1000). Join us for curator-led tours of the exhibition and for a preview of The Cotsen Textile Traces Study Center. Tours will rotate throughout the 2 hour period, so we hope you can join us as your schedules permit. Museum/tour admission free with conference badge or proof of AIA/SCS membership.

The GWUM-TM is located just 1.4 miles from the Marriott Marquis. In addition to walking or taking a taxi/Uber, visitors can use the Metro: from the Mt. Vernon Sq. Station, take the Yellow/Green Metro toward Branch Ave./Huntington, exit at the third stop at L’Enfant Plaza; transfer to Blue/Orange/Silver toward Franconia/Springfield/Vienna/Wiehle-Reston, and exit at the sixth stop at Foggy Bottom-GWU stop; the Museum is just 0.4 miles walk, two blocks east and one block south between H and G Sts. on 21st St. NW. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 12/19/2019 - 12:06pm by Erik Shell.

Latin Lexicography Summer School: 20–24 July, 2020

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 12/18/2019 - 2:38pm by Erik Shell.

The Fourteenth International Conference of the Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies (TACMRS)

23-24 October 2020
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Call for Papers

Food: Sacrificial, Spiritual, and Secular

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View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 12/18/2019 - 8:55am by Erik Shell.

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