CFP: The Soul in Ancient Philosophy

Call for Abstracts

The Second Annual St Andrews Graduate Conference in Ancient Philosophy

The Soul in Ancient Philosophy

11-12 October 2019

 We are delighted to announce our upcoming graduate conference on ‘The Soul in Ancient Philosophy’ taking place at the University of St Andrews, Scotland on the 11th and 12th of October 2019.

The keynote lectures will be delivered by Professor Dorothea Frede (Hamburg) and Professor Hendrik Lorenz (Princeton).

The soul has been of central importance in the ancient philosophical tradition, from the earliest Greek thinkers to the Neoplatonists. For ancient philosophers, the soul helps to account not only for various kinds of life on earth, such as human, animal, or even plant-life, but also the heavenly movements of the stars and planets. While the soul is often viewed as a principle of motion, in humans it is associated with a wide range of important phenomena, such as cognition, love, death, reason, emotions, and feelings. Moreover, the soul is sometimes seen to have a life of its own apart from the body, so that a distinction can be drawn between embodied and disembodied existence and experience. In this way, the soul naturally brings together a range of different philosophical concerns, including epistemology, ethics, psychology, the natural sciences, cosmology, and eschatology. 

The soul has received considerable attention in recent scholarship, and new studies have advanced the discussion in a variety of directions. Some have focussed on the world-soul, others on the partitions of the soul (and on its ‘non-rational’ parts), others on the soul and emotions, and others on the soul as self-motion. These are all prominent aspects of the soul in particular contexts, but rather than treating any single field of enquiry in isolation, our intention is to bring together young researchers from different areas of ancient philosophy who work on various concepts of soul, with the aim of producing a more holistic perspective.

We invite graduate students and recent graduates (who have completed their PhD degree up to 2 years before the submission deadline) to submit extended abstracts on any topic on the soul in ancient philosophy. The final papers should be suitable for a presentation of no more than 40 minutes followed by 20 minutes of questions and discussion.

Deadline for submission: 
Abstracts are due by the 15th of July. Candidates will be notified of the outcome by mid-August.

Submission requirements:

We seek extended abstracts of between 800 and 1000 words. Only one abstract per person will be accepted. Abstracts should be suitable for blind review and submitted through EasyChair at the following link: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sagcap2019

Organisers:

The conference is organised jointly by current PhD students and recent graduates both of Philosophy and the School of Classics. The organisers are: Manlio Fossati, Andrés Hernández Villarreal, Lorenzo Lazzarini, Julia Pfefferkorn, Wolfgang Sattler, and Matthew Shelton.

Conference Information:

The conference will take place at the University of St Andrews on the 11th and 12th of October 2019 in the Department of Philosophy, Edgecliffe. Travel bursaries of up to £100 will be available for each postgraduate speaker. We would be happy to arrange childcare for speakers who would not otherwise be able to attend the conference. Attendance is free of charge.

For further details, please see the conference website https://sagcap20466992.wordpress.com or e-mail Manlio Fossati or Matthew Shelton at ‘sagcap2019@gmail.com’.

We subscribe to the British Philosophical Association/Society for Women in Philosophy (UK) Good Practice Scheme.

This conference has been made possible through generous funding from the Scots Philosophical Association, the Classical Association, CAPOD, the Analysis Trust, the Aristotelian Society, and the University of St Andrews.

---

(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Princeton Classics major Veronica Shi delivered the traditional Latin oration at commencement ceremonies on May 31. Here is the text and translation of her Carmen Salutationis:

Salutatio

Habita in Comitiis Academicis Princetoniae
In Nova Caesarea prid. Kal. Iun.
Anno Salutis MMXI
Anno Academiae CCLXIV

Carmen Salutationis

quibus modis, quîs principiis, amans
Mater, salutem progeniem tuam?
    favete opus, Musae, novis ne
       nunc titubem pedibus rubescens!
nobis aratrix splendida messium
felixque dux, te, praesidium bonum,
    primam saluto, namque florent
       omnia lumine sub tuo; nec
vos nunc silebo, qui sapientia
tuentur Almam semper et omnibus
    Matrem; professoresque laudo
        filia grata scientiamque
eorum cano, quae discipulos alit
virtute, curis et patientia
    benignius: vobis pietas
        magna, amor altus et eruditus.
et vos, parentes: mane scholasticos
nos creditis, quos canticulo meo
   gaudere nunc vidistis: ecce
        spes modo perficimus decoras.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/01/2011 - 1:15pm by Information Architect.

The Winter 2011 Newsletter is now available for downloading as a pdf. It is also available online.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 05/25/2011 - 5:46pm by .

"Second-grader Joshua Jayne was decked out as a Roman centurion Tuesday, surrounded by classmates in bedsheets, as they visited ancient Rome in their own school cafeteria. Each year, Abington Christian Academy holds a living history day to give students a chance for hands-on learning, said school administrator Jan Wells." Read more: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/students-visit-ancient-rome-without-leaving-clarks-green-classrooms-1.1152101#ixzz1NNOaWZx4

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/25/2011 - 1:56pm by Information Architect.

Princeton's web site has a nice story about Veronica Shi, a classics major, who will deliver the traditional Latin oration at commencement ceremonies on May 31. Read it online here.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 05/24/2011 - 6:02pm by Information Architect.

The Boston Globe published a nice remembrance of Ernst Badian today. Read it online here …

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 05/23/2011 - 11:38am by .

"In the Bulgarian seaside resort town of Sozopol, archaeologists have unearthed an ancient temple of the goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, the private television channel bTV Reported on May 18 2011. The finds were made at Cape Skamnii in the ancient town of Sozopol. Numerous statues and other artifacts have been found, indicating that the site was, indeed, a temple dedicated to Demeter and Persephone." Read more in The Sofia Echo

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:09pm by Information Architect.

"Strolling through outer peristyle of the Getty Villa in Malibu, Calif., is about as close as you can get to time travelling. It’s easy to feel just like a Roman citizen discussing the affairs of the day while meandering through the gardens dotted with bronze statues or sitting at the edge of the 67-metre-long reflecting pool beneath a low-hanging sun. The only thing missing is the toga. While the ancient ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum in southern Italy leave visitors to piece together in their own minds what the daily lives of Romans must have been like, the Getty Villa leaves very little to the imagination." Read more in the Toronto Star.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:05pm by Information Architect.

Mike Lippman, a professor of Classics at the University of Arizona, is featured in an article about marathon readings on Insidehighered.com.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:21pm by .

This Thursday's poem at 3 Quarks Daily is full of puns with a classical theme:

The Agamemnon Rag

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:13pm by Information Architect.

Read Mary Beard's review of two new books on Hannibal at The Times Literary Supplement.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:09pm by Information Architect.

Pages

Latest Stories

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy