CFP: Symposium: Ancient Greek Pots and Social Class in Britain, 1789-1939

May 5, 2016, King’s College London

This symposium is convened by Dr. Alexia Petsalis-Diomidis under the aegis of the AHRC-funded Classics and Class research project based at King’s College London and directed by Professor Edith Hall and Dr. Henry Stead.

Classical material culture has been part of British material culture from at least the 17th century onwards and as such has played an important role in delineating class distinctions. Its popularity in the late 18th and 19th centuries is to be seen within the context of British colonialism and rising luxury consumption, itself a marker of class. In 18th- and 19th-century Britain, Greek pots were seen as the cheap cousins of more durable and “elevated” marble sculpture. While the reception of marginalized Greek pots is receiving increasing scholarly attention, research has focused predominantly on elite reception, notably collections in the houses of the rich, and expensive ceramics, furnishings and fashions, inspired directly by Greek pots and indirectly by their two-dimensional images in publications.

This symposium seeks to explore the reception of ancient Greek pots through the lens of social class and to bring to prominence hitherto marginalized working class and middle class engagements with this area of Classical material culture. The grounding of this project is threefold: first, the pots themselves are connected to non-elites of ancient Greece through their cheap material and manufacture by non-elite craftsmen, whose work had a direct analogue in that of the laborers in the Potteries and other factories; second, through their depiction of non-elite Athenian lives; and third, arguably, through their use by non-elites. A class-focused exploration of the reception of Greek pots offers the opportunity to analyze non-elite responses to ancient non-elites.

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be sent to alexia.petsalis-diomidis at kcl.ac.uk by 16 November 2015. Possible themes include (but are not limited to):

  • Greek pots and the objects they inspired within broader British material culture and consumption
  • Roles of gender in different class engagements with Greek pots
  • Roles and agencies of craftsmen inspired by Greek pots (e.g. potters, cabinet makers)
  • Widening access and viewing experiences of working and middle classes of Greek pots in houses and museums
  • Roles of Greek pots and inspired objects in demarcating class (particularly the appeal and consumption of cheaper objects such as Dilwyn pottery)
  • Relationship between different class engagements with classical pots (agency, top down models of influence or interpenetration)
  • Influence of arts & crafts movement on Sir John Beazley’s approach to Greek pots
  • View from abroad: class and ancient Greek pots in countries other than Britain (particularly Italy, France, Germany, Ottoman Empire). This could include the role of class in (licit and illicit) excavating, collecting and imitating Greek pots.

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Call for Papers: Southern Association for the History of Medicine and Science (SAHMS) Twentieth Annual Meeting, at Augusta University in Augusta, Georgia, February 15-17, 2018

Deadline for paper abstracts, panel submissions, and student travel grants is: November 1st, 2017. The Program Committee will notify you as to whether or not your paper is accepted no later than November 16th, 2017.

Submissions for individual papers and panels can be made online at the SAHMS website, at http://www.sahms.net/call-for-papers.html.

SAHMS is seeking paper submissions from students (including undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, and medical and health sciences professional students), professors, medical and legal professionals, and independent scholars with an academic interest in the history of science or medicine.

SAHMS welcomes papers that discuss the history of medicine and/or science. This is broadly construed to encompass all fields and subfields historical, literary, anthropological, philosophical, legal, and sociological related to the historical understanding of any aspect of science, medicine, health care, and the medical and health science professions, as well as closely related topics, including issues related to science or medicine involving race, disabilities, sustainability, environment, technology, and gender studies.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/18/2017 - 2:15pm by Erik Shell.

Statement from the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), American Alliance of Museums (AAM), American Anthropological Association (AAA), American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR), Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD), Society for Classical Studies (SCS), and U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield (USCBS) Regarding the United States of America’s Intention to Withdraw from UNESCO.

On October 12, 2017, the United States announced its decision to withdraw from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2018. A founding member of the Organization in 1945, the United States has benefited from UNESCO’s guiding precepts and principles in its efforts to preserve humanity’s shared heritage.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/18/2017 - 9:01am by Erik Shell.

(From John Finamore, University of Iowa)

Dear ISNS Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce the call for panels for the 16th annual ISNS conference, to be held in Los Angeles on June 13-16, 2018, in conjunction with Loyola Marymount University.

Anyone interested in organizing a panel at the conference should send a brief description of the panel along with its title and the name(s) and email address(es) of the contact person(s) to the conference organizers:

Panel descriptions are due to us by January 22, 2018.  I will email the list of proposed panels to the ISNS membership before February 5. Panel organizers are responsible for choosing and collecting abstracts for their panels. They should notify the organizers of their decisions by February 26.  Abstracts should be no more than one page, single spaced.

We also welcome individual abstracts for papers that do not fall under any of the announced panels.  Please send those abstracts (again, one-page maximum) to the four conference organizers above.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/16/2017 - 9:11am by Erik Shell.

Roman Inscriptions of Britain is a digitally-enhanced version of R.G. Collingwood and R.P. Wright’s Roman Inscriptions of Britain, vol. 1 (1965), and its 2,400 inscriptions. It includes all subsequent Addenda and Corrigenda to volume 1. Volumes 2 (1990–1995, instrumentum domesticum) and 3 (2009, more recent finds) are not yet available online, but all the major Roman inscriptions of Britain are included here. Since the work of editing, preparing, and composing commentary for the inscriptions had already been done, the site’s creator, Scott Vanderbilt, could focus the interface, and on applying TEI and EpiDoc markups. The result is a rich, interactive website: a powerful tool for scholars and students, and a delight to even casual visitors.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/16/2017 - 12:00am by Rebecca R. Benefiel.

Ancient Philosophy Society
18th Annual Independent Meeting

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
April 26-April 29, 2018

Honoring the richness of the American and European philosophical traditions, the Ancient Philosophy Society encourages submissions from a variety of interpretive perspectives. Phenomenological, postmodern, Anglo-American, Straussian, Tübingen School, hermeneutic, psychoanalytic, queer, feminist, and any other interpretations of ancient Greek and Roman philosophical and literary works are welcome.
Please submit papers by e-mail attachment to APS2018@emory.edu. Deadline: November 22, 2017. The author’s name, institution, and references pertaining to the identity of the author must be omitted from the paper, notes, and bibliography. The e-mail accompanying the submission must include the author’s name, the title of the paper, address, telephone, e-mail address, and institutional affiliation.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:24am by Erik Shell.

The Annual Meeting page for our 150th meeting in San Diego, CA is now live. This page will be the hub for all news and developments for our 2019 meeting, which marks our historic Sesquicentennial.

Listed there already are the Calls for Abstracts for the Affiiliated Group Panels, the Organizer-Refereed Panels, and the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 2:29pm by Erik Shell.

Seventh Annual Tennessee Undergraduate Classics Research Conference--Call for Papers

This conference will pertain to a wide variety of topics concerning the classical world, with paper sessions being divided by theme based on the papers accepted. Abstracts will be considered from any discipline within classical studies (archaeology, history, philology, art, etc.) or a related field, including interdisciplinary topics or topics in Egyptology and the ancient Near East. Examples range from an analysis of the rhetoric of a Demosthenic speech to a report of the findings of a current excavation to a commentary on the hybridization of style in Pompeian wall painting (this is not an exhaustive list).

Submission of Abstracts

Abstracts are due by 5:00pm EST on Monday, November 13, 2017 to clasclub@utk.edu. You must also fill out and submit an information sheet via Google Forms. The Google Form can be found here. Notifications of acceptance will be sent on Friday, December 1, 2017. Click here for a guide for abstract submissions.

Abstract Details

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:24am by Erik Shell.

Thresholds in Literature and the Arts
International Conference

Centre for Classical Studies – Centre for Comparative Studies
School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon (Portugal)
June 2018, 7-8

During the last century the concept of “liminality” has gained increasing attention in many disciplines, from psychology to anthropology, from philosophy to literary and cultural studies. But the state that the word defines is much older than the word itself. Suffice it to think of the myths, heroes and gods related to the katabasis and other forms of passage in ancient Greek and Latin cultures, to get a hint of the historical depth of such a concept.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 8:56am by Erik Shell.

August 2012: a Latinist, a scholar of Chinese martial arts novels, a classical Persianist, a historian of early Vietnam, a Renaissance literature scholar, an archaeologist of pre-modern Malaya, and a post-colonial literature specialist assembled in New Haven. It was just like a gathering of Marvel’s AvengersTM, but with less spandex. We gathered not to save the world, but to read it: in their Olympian wisdom (to mix mythological universes), President Richard Levin of Yale University and President Tan Chorh Chuan of National University of Singapore had decided to establish Yale-NUS College, a jointly founded small liberal arts college located in Singapore. Their goal was to create a new model for higher education in a globalized future (or something Davos-y like that): our job was to design and eventually teach an interdisciplinary humanities first-year course called “Literature and Humanities,” one half of a yearlong Great Works sequence.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am by Mira Seo.

Cyprus: a Place and Topos in Ancient Literature

Whether it was love, war, struggle or simply a breathtaking landscape that inspired authors in antiquity, Cyprus had it all. Greek and Latin literature abounds with references to the island: the land of kings and heroes and, most importantly, the birthplace of Aphrodite/Venus, Cyprus offers to ancient authors numerous sources of inspiration - Teucer, Evagoras, Pygmalion, Cinyras, Myrrha, Adonis, to name but a few. At the same time, Cyprus the place has a unique cultural identity, shaped under the multiple interrelations, contacts and assimilations of indigenous Cypriot, Greek, and Eastern elements. Similar is the shaping of the linguistic landscape of the island.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 2:38pm by Erik Shell.

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