CFP: Three Classical Panels at NeMLA

Panel 1: Reading and Writing the Classics in Antiquity and Beyond

NeMLA 2019, March 21-24 in Washington, D.C. 
Chair: Claire Sommers, csommers@gc.cuny.edu
Abstracts Due: September 30, 2018

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has survived for thousands of years. As a result, Classical literary and philosophical works have served as a profound influence on the writings of subsequent time periods. Indeed, in many subsequent time periods, the ability to quote from Classical sources became a marker of status and intelligence. However, many works of ancient Greece and Rome are not wholly original, but in fact flaunt their use of source materials, citing earlier versions of myths and epics. Often, Classical and post-Classical authors would modify their source materials, and we are able to see them not only as writers, but as readers in their own right.

This panel will explore the use of ancient sources in Classical literature and its descendants. We will examine how Classical works engage with previous sources and how ancient works of literature and philosophy became important source materials in subsequent time periods. Possible approaches include:

  • Allusions to other ancient sources in Classical literature and philosophy
  • The use of Classical works in the texts of later time periods
  • Alterations and revisions that are made to Classical sources
  • The overlap between writer and reader in the use of Classical sources
  • The status of Classical sources throughout the ages
  • The use of satire and/or parody to engage with the Classics
  • Classical texts and the creation of new genres

Please submit a 300 word abstract and 100 word bio by September 30, 2018. You will need to create an user account through the NeMLA account in order to submit an abstract. Contact Claire Sommers (csommers@gc.cuny.edu) with any questions. 

Panel 2: Classical Metanarrative, Aesthetics, and the Creative Process

NeMLA 2019, March 21-24 in Washington, D.C. 
Chair: Claire Sommers, csommers@gc.cuny.edu
Abstracts Due: September 30, 2018

Ancient Greece and Rome have had a profound influence on subsequent literature. While our analyses of Classical literature, philosophy, and art often focus on the characters and stories they depict, these works often served as a means to examine the aesthetic process itself. One of the earliest surviving Greek texts, Homer’s Iliad, goes so far as to depict its protagonist Achilles singing of ancient heroes and strumming his lyre as a means of determining the effect of being remembered in epic.

This panel session will explore how ancient art, literature, and philosophy utilize metanarrative and meditate upon the act of creation, and how it serves as a means of examining the creative process in subsequent time periods. Possible approaches include:

  • Classical reflections on their own genres and media
  • Classical critiques of sources
  • Metanarratives in Classical texts
  • Classical theories of aesthetics and their influence
  • Discussions of contemporaneous art, music, literature, and drama in Classical literature
  • The use of Classical sources in subsequent literature as a means of reflection

Please submit a 300 word abstract and 100 word bio by September 30, 2018. You will need to create an user account through the NeMLA account in order to submit an abstract. Contact Claire Sommers (csommers@gc.cuny.edu) with any questions. 

Panel 3: Greco-Roman Myth in Literature and/or the Arts
Chair: Ronnie Ancona, rancona@hunter.cuny.edu

Since Classics is a new secondary area of inquiry for NeMLA, this session attempts to cast its net quite broadly. The intention is to appeal to classicists or others dealing with Greco-Roman literature, history, archaeology, and culture and its later reception for abstracts that will have wide appeal to the NeMLA audience.

Myth is a central feature of Greco-Roman studies as well as its legacy. We look for papers addressing any aspect of Greco-Roman myth in its original contexts or in its later reworkings. Papers may be theoretical in nature, addressing various ways of defining and interpreting myth, or may focus on one or more specific instantiations of Greco-Roman myth. Papers addressing the permutations of a single myth over time are welcome, as are discussions of pedagogical issues involving the teaching of Greco-Roman myth, in general, or of a specific myth or type of myth.

All abstracts (and eventual papers) should have in mind the general NeMLA audience and should not be aimed solely at classicists. All papers should be presented in English.

The topic of Greco-Roman myth will allow for a panel that deals with Greco-Roman literature and culture as well as its reception. The aim of the panel will be to demonstrate the contribution of Classics to a living tradition.

For further general information, go to the following links:

https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla.html

https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17374

For submissions (due September 30th), go to the first link above and click on “Submit Your Abstracts.” Then in the search box at the upper right corner, search by “Ancona” or the panel title. 

NeMLA membership is not required to submit abstracts, but is required to present at the convention.

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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The Ancient Mediterranean for Modern Audiences: Reception, Pedagogy, Entertainment

March 6-7, 2020
Ohio Union, Columbus, Ohio

The aim of the OSU Classics Graduate Student Colloquium is to explore various directions in which the Ancient Mediterranean has been adapted and utilized by different cultures in Modern world from the Renaissance to the present day. In recent years, the online journal “Eidolon” and other public scholarship media have already successfully demonstrated how the cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean can be accessed, interpreted, and applied through various experiences by scholars, students, writers, and by the wider communities. We believe that the reception of Ancient Mediterranean cultures has become an important element of Classical scholarship and pedagogy. It is a critical point of contact between the academic community and the general audience.

The OSU Classics Graduate Student Colloquium invites papers on a range of topics that discuss and analyze the reception of the Ancient Mediterranean from a point of view of philology, linguistics, theater and performance studies, history, pedagogy, archaeology, art history, philosophy, anthropology, political studies, media studies, and/or gender studies. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/26/2019 - 12:34pm by Erik Shell.

Conference: Cathartic History

University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA
February 25-27, 2021

The aim of this conference and the edited collection that will result is to propose Aristotelian catharsis as a new lens for historical inquiry. The project aims to do so, specifically, through the study of cathartic history as a phenomenon in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean and in the field of Classical history today. In the process, the project will serve as an example of the productive application of catharsis to the study of the past, and thus a model for other fields of historical research.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 09/26/2019 - 10:22am by Erik Shell.

SCS member and Classical Studies professor at the University of Pennsylvania Emily Wilson has won a 2019 MacArthur Fellowship by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

You can read the full announcement on the UPenn page here.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 09/26/2019 - 9:55am by Erik Shell.

International Association for Presocratic Studies

Seventh Biennial Conference: 15-19 July 2020
Belo Horizonte, Brazil: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

Chair of Organizing Committee: Miriam Peixoto

The International Association for Presocratic Studies announces its Seventh Biennial Conference. The meeting will take place at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil 15-19 June 2020 (http://www.ufmg.br). 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/25/2019 - 11:37am by Erik Shell.

Poetry, Philosophy, and Mathematics: Performance, Text, and External Representations in Ancient Greek Cultural Practices

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/25/2019 - 11:02am by Erik Shell.

The SCS board of directors has endorsed a statement on the use of student evaluations of teaching developed by the American Sociological Association.

The board has also reaffirmed its own statement of November 28, 2016 that condemns “the use of the texts, ideals, and images of the Greek and Roman world to promote racism or a view of the Classical world as the unique inheritance of a falsely-imagined and narrowly-conceived western civilization.” In accordance with that statement, the board has also endorsed the American Historical Association’s statement on Domestic Terrorism, Bigotry, and History and would like to draw attention to its condemnation of the “recent deployment of histories invented in the interest of bigotry, violence, and division.”

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 09/25/2019 - 10:22am by Erik Shell.

Registration is now live for the Spatial Turn in Roman Studies Auckland conference, to be held January 22-24, 2020. For information about the conference, please see https://www.dur.ac.uk/classics/spatialturn/auckland/

If you plan to attend the Auckland conference, please fill out this registration form, including reading the event code of conduct linked to in the form.  

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/25/2019 - 9:09am by Erik Shell.

Here are a few important deadlines coming up at the end of this month:

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 8:32am by Erik Shell.

Of the slew of Disney’s new live-action remakes, perhaps the most anticipated release was this summer’s The Lion King, directed by Jon Favreau. After all, the original 1994 version was arguably the crown jewel of the ‘Disney Renaissance’, enjoying massive commercial and critical success (followed by a highly successful Broadway production). More importantly - at least for those like me who grew up in the 90’s - it was a cultural touchstone, a perennial source of references, parodies, and praise.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 10:00pm by Colin MacCormack.

The following members were elected in the ballot held this Summer. They take office in January 2020, except for the two new members of the Nominating Committee who take office immediately.  Thank you to all SCS members who agreed to stand for election this year.

President-Elect

Shelley P. Haley

Vice President for Communications and Outreach

Alison Futrell

Goodwin Committee

Harriet Flower

Nominating Committee

Toph Marshall

Patrice Rankine

Program Committee

Melissa Mueller

Carlos Noreña

Directors

John Gruber-Miller

Jennifer Sheridan Moss

Professional Ethics Statement Amendment

Passed

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 9:40am by Erik Shell.

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