CFP: Truth and Relativism in Ancient Philosophy

CFP: Truth and Relativism in Ancient Philosophy
Wednesday 19th June — Friday 21st June 2019
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Groningen

This conference will bring together philosophers interested in examining truth and relativism in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy.
Confirmed speakers include: Paolo Crivelli (Geneva); Matthew Duncombe (Nottingham); Marion Durand (Toronto); Paul Gottlieb (Wisconsin); Orna Harari (Tel Aviv); John MacFarlane (Berkeley); Tamer Nawar (Groningen); and Noburu Notomi (Tokyo).

Submissions on the topics of truth and relativism in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy are invited. If you would like your paper to be considered, please go to https://easychair.org/cfp/TRAP1 and submit your abstract there through EasyChair.
- submissions should be made through Easychair (see the submission link on https://easychair.org/cfp/TRAP1); you will need to register for an account.
- when registering for an account, please ensure that you give your contact details correctly. Please give your full name, affiliation, and other details.
- detailed abstracts of up to 1000 words should be submitted by Wednesday 9th January 2019.
- the abstract should be attached as a .PDF file.
- the abstract should be suitable for anonymous review.

All questions about submissions or other matters should be emailed to Tamer Nawar (T.Nawar@rug.nl)
Details about the conference are available here: https://tamernawar.weebly.com/conference-truth-and-relativism-in-ancient-philosophy-june-2019.html

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(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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To assist developers of websites who wish to embed New Athena Unicode font, the APA has recently clarified that the Open Font License for New Athena Unicode applies to the woff format as well as to the TrueType format that is installed by users on their own computers.

In addition, all four styles of New Athena Unicode version 4.05 have been converted to woff format and are available for download at the GreekKeys site.

This new font format is for hosting on web servers. Users of GreekKeys 2008 for Mac OS X and Windows should continue to use the TrueType version (newathu.ttf) in their own work in word processors or other desktop applications.

For more information see:

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Tue, 01/21/2014 - 10:17am by Information Architect.

The editors and editorial board of the APA’s outreach publication Amphora are very pleased to announce Amphora is making itself yet more available to its readership. In coming weeks, in addition to its annual print appearance, Amphora will also publish its articles and reviews via the APA’s blog.

Articles and reviews will each have a tag of Amphora, to help readers determine which content stream is which, as usual for the blog. Such tagged pieces will also appear in the print version of the publication, possibly with minor modification as called for by a switch from one format to another.

This improvement to the availability of Amphora means we will now be able to work with authors who might have a prospective contribution with digital elements – images, perhaps, or film or sound clips, or a desire for a discussion thread or feedback – as well as with contributors whose works benefit from a print treatment.

As always, your Amphora editors welcome submissions, including submissions that take advantage of this new presentation.  These are important days for outreach activity by our professional association, and the Amphora and Outreach committees believe this new format will enable us all to reach a yet-larger market.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 01/20/2014 - 8:43pm by Ellen Bauerle.

Individuals who registered in advance for the recent annual meeting in Chicago but who were unable to attend because their flights were canceled, and they could not obtain new reservations in time to attend the meeting should use this form to claim a refund for registration and publication fees.  As you will see, the form can be completed electronically.  We suggest that you save and rename the form, fill it out, and then submit it as an e-mail attachment to apameetings@sas.upenn.edu.  All claims must be received by January 31, 2014.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/14/2014 - 10:08am by Adam Blistein.

In last month’s column, I offered an overview of the Greek myth of the Titanomachy, the war between the Olympian gods (Zeus, Hera, and all the rest) and the earlier generation, the Titans; and I discussed some recent media telling of the escape of the Titans from their underworld prison and a second Titanomachy: in Disney’s 1997 Hercules, in the 1998 straight-to-video Hercules and Xena animated movie, in the 2012 movie Wrath of the Titans (sequel to the remake of Clash of the Titans), in the 2013 movie Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters, in the 2011 movie Immortals, and in the video game series God of War.

Today I finish the journey by exploring the ramifications of these stories and their thematic material.

There’s a pattern to these stories.  In all of them, the Titans are reawakened and they are opposed by a half-god protagonist: Perseus, Hercules, Percy, Theseus, Kratos (sort of).  In each, the protagonist has a history of family loss.  Perseus in Wrath of the Titans is a widower.  The Disney Hercules is estranged from his birth parents, while the Kevin Sorbo version lost his wife and children to a fireball sent by Hera.  Percy Jackson feels abandoned by his father Poseidon.  Theseus in Immortals endures the death of his mother during the film.  Kratos accidentally killed his family and is killed by his own father.  Most of the protagonists are soldiers — Percy Jackson, for instance, is a teenager at a “camp” filled with what are essentially child/teen demigod soldiers.  The Titans themselves are generally either monstrous or demonic in appearance, in contrast to the ancient Greek depictions of them as essentially anthropomorphic (as in the vase painting to the right).​

So what’s the meaning behind all these modern Titanomachies?  The surface explanation — that gods fighting gods makes for cool action scenes — isn’t all there is to it.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 01/10/2014 - 9:05am by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad.

Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy is often characterised in terms of competitive individuals debating orally with one another in public arenas.  But it also developed over its long history a sense in which philosophers might look to an authority and offer to that authority explicit intellectual allegiance.  This is most obvious in the development of the philosophical ‘schools’ with agreed founders and canonical founding texts.  There also developed a tradition of commentary, interpretation, and discussion of texts—composed by ‘authorities’—which often became the focus of disagreement between members of the same school or movement and also useful targets for critics interested in attacking a whole tradition.  Discussing the meaning, force, and even the authorship itself of these texts became a mode of philosophical debate.

This international conference will investigate the twin notions of ‘authorship’ and ‘authority’—the Latin word auctoritas combines these two—in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy.  Topics to be explored include: philosophical allegiance and schism, commentary and quotation, the treatment of anonymous texts or texts of disputed authorship, the collection of authorised corpora of texts and the rejection of spurious or non-canonical works.

More details will be posted on the Faculty of Classics website.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/09/2014 - 3:25pm by Adam Blistein.

We are very grateful to the nearly 2,500 registrants who overcame difficult travel conditions to attend last week’s joint annual meeting.  At the same time, we are aware that some members who had registered in advance were unable to come to Chicago because their initial airline reservations were cancelled, and their carriers could not put them on different flights in time to attend the meeting.  APA and AIA carry “convention cancellation insurance” for such events, and next week we will announce a procedure by which affected individuals can apply for refunds of advance registration fees.

Adam D. Blistein, APA Executive Director
Kevin Quinlan, AIA Interim Executive Director

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 01/08/2014 - 1:07pm by Adam Blistein.

Anna Shaw Benjamin died on July 21, 2013. Dr. Benjamin received both undergraduate and graduate education at the University of Pennsylvania (B.A. 1946, Ph.D. 1955) and at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. At the latter she held two fellowships, being a Thomas Day Seymour Fellow (1948/1949) and a Fulbright Fellow (1949/1950).

Dr. Benjamin commenced her devoted teaching career in 1951, as Instructor in Classical Languages and Humanities at Juniata College, a small institution in Pennsylvania, which she left for the University of Missouri-Columbia after receiving her Ph.D. in 1955. There, over almost a decade, she moved from Instructor in Classics and Archaeology to Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor, and Chair. In 1964, she came to Rutgers University as a Full Professor in the Department of Classics from which she retired in 1987. During her years at Rutgers she served at various times as Chairperson and/or Director of Graduate Studies and created an archeology program within the Classics Department.  Most summers were spent at digs in Greece with colleagues at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens and later at excavations at Aphrodisias in Turkey.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 12/30/2013 - 12:49pm by Adam Blistein.

Our colleagues at AIA have once again developed an online scheduling tool that will permit you to develop a schedule of events you want to attend in Chicago.  You can develop your schedule from lists of sessions, committee meetings, and special events organized by APA, AIA, and affiliated groups.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/24/2013 - 10:18am by Adam Blistein.

In my final letter to the membership, I would like to give you all an idea of where we are headed as an organization in the near future.  Our organization is evolving in an exciting way.  We are the heirs of a distinguished history of developing and supporting research and teaching in all the areas of our discipline, and we shall continue to foster those goals as energetically and creatively as we can.  In my last letter I referred to some of the most conspicuous ways in which we are fulfilling this vital part of our mission, in particular with support for L’Année philologique and development of the Digital Latin Library.  At the same time, we are taking seriously the commitments we made in the Gateway Campaign to making the world of classics and the work of APA members valuable to a larger audience, both within and outside academia.  We are in the process of journeying through that Gateway – including evolution of our name, our logo, our web site, our annual meeting, our organizational structure, and our advocacy messages.  No part of our new orientation involves abandoning our history and mission.  In fact, without the foundation of the scholarly and teaching work of our members, we would have little to offer. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 12/18/2013 - 3:46pm by Adam Blistein.

Garrett Fagan recently posed an interesting question in his very useful discussion of the crisis in the humanities: “should we embrace the competition for students in a marketplace of majors?” That my answer is “yes” is probably evident from my last post, in which I urged classicists to participate in public discourse in order to insure that the public image of Classics is both attractive to our students and acceptable to their parents. Not everyone shares this view. Many scholars cringe at the economic and corporate metaphors that often cluster around this issue (“competition,” “marketplace”) and worry about the dilution of rigor and intellectualism they connote. But in my view we do not need to choose between “giving the students what they want” and our core values as humanists. We do, however, need to give ourselves permission to reconnect in our classes with the reasons most people are drawn to the humanities in the first place.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 12/18/2013 - 8:34am by Curtis Dozier.

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