Classical Studies in the 21st Century

Classical Studies in the 21st Century: More Relevant Than Ever

The AIA-SCS joint ad hoc committee on the future of classics and archaeology met earlier this year to discuss pressures common to both fields. The group agreed to create a document that can be used to remind college and university administrators of what we do and our relevance. The joint statement entitled “Classical Studies in the 21st Century: More Relevant Than Ever,” is below and also available as a PDF download. Department chairs and other departmental members are welcome to use it as talking points with decision-makers at your institutions, be they chairs, deans, provosts, chancellors and some other administrator, as a reminder of the continuing and important benefits of our fields. You may use the entire statement or customize it to meet the specific needs of your department and profile of your institution. We realize that there are many successful advocacy strategies, and we hope this brief statement will join them. If you have already successfully advocated to preserve or expand your department, let us know what worked.

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The Society for Classical Studies and the Archaeological Institute of America affirm the value and benefits of undergraduate and graduate academic engagement with classical antiquity. “Classics” once denoted the languages, histories and cultures, and material remains of the Greek and Roman societies dominant in the Mediterranean (~ 2000 BCE-500 CE) and contributing to European and American history, law and politics, and literature. Now, thanks to diverse perspectives and new technologies, the field looks to the present and future as well as the past, and it is ever more accessible. Contemporary classicists and archaeologists engage with cultural property and repatriation, for example; others read The Iliad with PTSD-afflicted veterans; still others compare empire-building in China and in Rome. Today the study of the Classical world stretches from antiquity to the future and encompasses regions far outside the Mediterranean. 

As core humanities disciplines, Classical Studies and Archaeology advance undergraduates’ varied careers and goals in ways eloquently attested by the National Humanities Alliance. Our statement focuses more specifically on the virtues of courses that your institution may offer through departments or programs in Classical Studies, Classics, Mediterranean Studies, and the like. Your own faculty and students would be happy to tell you more about these and other benefits, as well as the exciting work they do daily. In the meantime, we list some benefits here:

• The precision needed to explore cultures that peaked thousands of years ago and to interpret fragmentary remains builds critical thinking and other skills essential to all higher learning.
• Archaeology courses are a perfect bridge between STEM and the Humanities.
• Online epigraphic, papyrological, archaeological, and other types of classics databases hone skills in data curation and analysis.
• Learning Greek, Latin, and other languages and literature analyzed for centuries provides structured ways to understand language, and to internalize and improve syntax, vocabulary, and literary style.
• The history of the Mediterranean, marked by slavery, suppression of women and noncitizens, steep inequalities, and other rampant injustices, allows engagement with difficult issues that still resonate today.
• Classical political philosophy helped shaped our US Constitution and others; its grasp enables analysis and informed debate of current politics and governments.
• Ancient art and architecture have continued to influence sculptors, painters, buildings, and urban planning; Greek and Roman literature has resonated through the ages. Students investigate classical themes and elements re-imagined from Donatello to Vik Muniz, Paris’ Arc de Triomphe to the Lincoln Memorial and Mexico City’s El Palacio de Bellas Artes, or Shakespeare to Gwendolyn Brooks, and understand the importance of the past to the present.
• Ancient philosophy, by inquiring into the meaning of life and grappling with personal success and failure, allows students to reflect and connect with others.
• Archaeological field work provides experiential, collaborative, and vertical learning.
• Islamic scholars preserved and developed Greek and Roman science and medicine, one example of beneficial cross-cultural interactions significant for the Classics.

Mary T. Boatwright, President (2019), Society of Classical Studies; Jodi Magness, President (2016-19), Archaeological Institute of America (June 8, 2019)

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Please note that the deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 15.

You can submit your abstract via our online Program Submission System  

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/15/2019 - 8:37am by Erik Shell.

'Addressing the Divide' is a new series of columns that looks at the ways in which the modern field of Classics was constructed and then explores ways to identify, modify, or simply abolish the lines between fields in order to embrace broader ideas of what Classics was, is, and could be. This month, Sarah Bond discusses the partition between Biblical Studies and the field of Classics.

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 04/13/2019 - 6:56am by Sarah E. Bond.

The index and all the published volumes of the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (A–M, O–P, and Onomasticon C–D) are now available as open access pdfs from the Bavarian Academy:

http://www.thesaurus.badw.de/tll-digital/tll-open-access.html

Please note that the pdfs may currently be slow to load.


Picture: "Library of the Thesaurus linguae latinae" by N. P. Holmes, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

 
 

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Fri, 04/12/2019 - 11:29am by Helen Cullyer.
POWER AND KNOWLEDGE
in Plato and the Platonic Tradition
22-24 May, Uppsala (Sweden)

Registration is now open for the international symposium ‘Power & Knowledge in Plato and the Platonic Tradition', which will take place at the department of philosophy at Uppsala University on the 22nd-24th of May 2019. The program is included below. For more information about the symposium and what we hope to achieve, see: http://rationalselfgovernment.se/power-and-knowledge/.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 12:10pm by Erik Shell.

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2019

Invention has fascinated audiences at least since the god Hephaestus created self-locomoting robot-women as workshop assistants—and Prometheus’ theft of fire allowed humans to develop their own technology. From Méliès’ re-creation of Lucian’s trip to the moon, to myriad takes on Pygmalion fabricating the “perfect woman,” to Hypatia’s fatal scientific inquiry in Amenábar’s Agora, on-screen depictions of invention and technology in the ancient Mediterranean world and the classical tradition have dramatized their potential to delight, empower, and enlighten—as well as the ethical and moral concerns they stimulate.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 10:46am by Erik Shell.

Those who will submit Individual Abstracts for the 2020 Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. should sign up for their SCS memberships by this Friday, April 11th, as memberships take a couple days to process and all submissions must come from SCS Members.

You can renew or sign up for SCS membership here: https://scs.press.jhu.edu/membership/join

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 10:28am by Erik Shell.

We would like to remind SCS members who are considering submitting for the 2020 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., that the Lightning Talk format - launched this year at our Sesquicentennial - is returning for 2020 as well.

Members who have a topic about which they are passionate and can speak succinctly are encouraged to apply.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 04/10/2019 - 2:41pm by Erik Shell.

Please note these important upcoming deadlines:

1. The deadline for submission of the following is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 8:

  • Panel, seminar, workshop, and roundtable proposals for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Affiliated group and organizer-refereed panel reports for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Applications for renewed or new charters for affiliated groups
  • Applications for organizer-refereed panels for the 2021 Annual Meeting

2. The deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 15.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/08/2019 - 8:26am by Erik Shell.
Teaching Rome at Home:  The Classics in America
A conference at the University of Maryland, College Park
May 2-4, 2019

Thursday, May 2

3:30 PM  Keynote lecture:  “The Lion in the Path:  Classics Meets Modernity”
Hunter R. Rawlings III, Professor and University President Emeritus, Cornell University

5:00 PM  Reception

Friday, May 3

1:00 – 1:50  “The ‘Gender Turn’ in Classics,” Eva Stehle, University of Maryland, Emerita

1:50 – 2:00  Break

2:00 – 3:30  Paper session

2:00  “The Value of Latin in the Liberal Arts Curriculum,” Norman Austin, University of Arizona, Emeritus

2:30  “Vergil’s Aeneid and Twenty-first Century Immigration,” Christopher Nappa, University of Minnesota

3:00  “A Latin Curriculum Set in Africa Proconsularis,” Holly Sypniewski, Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi; Kenneth Morrell, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee; and Lindsay Samson, Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia

3:30 – 4:00  Break

4:00 – 5:00  Workshop:  “Confronting Sexual Violence in the Secondary Latin Classroom,” Danielle Bostick, John Handley High School, Winchester, Virginia

5:00  Reception

Saturday, May 4

10:00 - 12:00  Paper session

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 04/05/2019 - 9:15am by Erik Shell.

A Day in the Life of A Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog, celebrating the working lives of classicists. This month, we look at the life of Classics graduate student Jordan Johansen.  

I typically wake up early, around 5:30 am. I never considered myself a morning person until I got to graduate school, but I got in the habit from taking Greek & Latin survey classes. I found that I couldn’t read Greek and Latin as clearly, efficiently, or quickly late at night, so I started working in the morning. Now that I’m done with surveys, I’ve kept up with the habit. I like that I can get a lot done before I start my day on campus. There are also usually not very many emails coming in that early, so it’s easier to keep from being distracted.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 04/04/2019 - 5:04pm by Jordan Johansen.

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