Classicist from Duke Named Rhodes Scholar

Gabrielle C. Stewart, a senior Classical Languages major at Duke University, has been named a Rhodes Scholar for 2018.

"In her time at Duke, she has demonstrated great leadership both on campus and off through her social justice work and her research on ancient Greece."

To read the full write-up, check out the article featured on Duke's website here.

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(Photo: "Duke University" by Ilyse Whitney, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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150th Logo

The Society for Classical Studies (SCS) has been awarded a grant of $150,000 by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant will advance two strategic priorities of the organization: (a) engaging a public audience in the appreciation and critical discussion of the ancient world and its legacy; and (b) addressing diversity and inclusion in the field of Classics within the US and globally.

The grant will support a consultant, who, as Public Engagement Coordinator, will document and evaluate public events planned for 2019, the Society's Sesquicentennial year; and plan and develop new public-facing programs and resources. The grant also includes a pool of funding for mini-grants for public programming in 2020. The grant will also provide support for: travel stipends for students from historically underrepresented minority groups and students committed to increasing diversity and inclusion within the field to attend the Society's upcoming annual meetings; events related to race, ethnicity, diversity, and inclusion at the meetings; and travel for invited speakers from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. As SCS approaches it Sesquicentennial year, this award will enable the Society to meet its short-term goals and build capacity for the longer term.


View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 09/28/2018 - 11:27am by Helen Cullyer.
Image of A.E. Stalling’s new book of poetry, Like, and a scarf with its cover printed on it (Image used by permission and taken by John Psaropoulos).

This month in her ‘art of translation’ column, Adrienne K.H. Rose interviews A.E. Stallings while in Pylos and then in Virginia. The two discuss the word choices made by translators, the surprising relevance of Archaic poetry in the tumultuous present era, and the effects of living life in a foreign language.

Q: How did you decide to study Classics?

Gradually, then suddenly—I didn't start taking Latin until college [at the University of Georgia], where I was initially an English and Music major, but I started with Latin 1, and just kept taking more and more Latin and Classics courses until finally the department (in particular Rick LaFleur, then Dept. head), gently suggested I change majors.

Q: Could you say a bit about the significance of learning Latin and Greek and translating Classics and its impact on you?

It changed my understanding of writing poetry for one thing.  As I've said elsewhere, I realized how contemporary Catullus sounded, but also that he was writing in very strict poetic forms.  I realized you could sound modern and scan. I realized that ancient poets often sounded more up-to-date to me than a lot of what I was reading in contemporary literary journals. It removed some anxiety I had about the modern literary scene.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 09/27/2018 - 3:52pm by Adrienne K.H. Rose.

Below are the citations for the winners of our 2018 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit. Please join us in congratulating this year's winners.

Gil H. Renberg

Amy Richlin

Harriet I. Flower

Gil H. RenbergWhere Dreams May Come:  Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World.  Leiden:  Brill, 2017.

Sweet dreams, bad dreams, broken dreams, impossible dreams, dream jobs, dreams come true, dreamy dates, dream teams, the American dream, only in your dreams, dream on: dreams are among our most familiar experiences but wonderfully mysterious all the same. In modern times dreams tend to be something internal and personal, perhaps mere nonsense, perhaps an expression of wishes and fears conscious or unconscious. For classical peoples, dreams were something more, signs from outside, indeed an important channel for divine-human communication. And so incubation – sleeping in a place where dreams may come – was a multi-faceted practice throughout the ancient world from earliest times to late antiquity: a practice undertaken for therapy, for cures, for enlightenment, and for revelations.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 09/27/2018 - 12:35pm by Erik Shell.

"Transforming Classics: 150 Years of Classical Studies in New York"

Tuesday, November 13, 2018, from 5:30pm to 7:45pm with a reception to follow
Hemmerdinger Hall, 32 Waverly Place
New York, NY 10003

Background

On November 13, 1868, a group of scholars resolved to form the American Philological Association (APA), now the Society for Classical Studies (SCS). The APA was originally a society for "lovers of philology."

Throughout the 150-year history of the APA/SCS, New York's scholars, teachers, students, and institutions have played a central role in developing and transforming our field.

Event

On November 13, 2018, the Society for Classical Studies, along with the Center for Ancient Studies, will present "Transforming Classics: 150 Years of Classical Studies in New York." Speakers will discuss how New York-based organizations and programs have: 

  1. shaped what counts as Classics;
  2. changed who gets to participate in and lead the field; and/or 
  3. opened up new directions that connect the study of the Greco-Roman world with other ancient and modern traditions

This event is free and open to the public. You can register by filing out this registration form.

Schedule

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 09/26/2018 - 12:18pm by Erik Shell.

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2019-2020. Submission deadline is January 15, 2019 (11:59 p.m. EST).

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 09/26/2018 - 11:58am by Erik Shell.

13th London Ancient Science Conference

Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, University of London
Monday, February 11th to Friday, February 15th 2019.

Abstracts of around 200 words should be sent to Prof. Andrew Gregory (andrew.gregory@ucl.ac.uk) by 31st October. Decisions early November.

Papers are welcomed from established academics, postdocs and postgraduate students. Papers are welcomed on science in any ancient culture treated historically, philosophically, sociologically or technically. Science is construed quite broadly and may include epistemology, metaphysics and ontology relating to the natural world.

This year there will be three panel sessions:

  • Prof. Mark Geller will chair a session on Babylonian Science and Medicine.
  • Prof. Robert Hahn will chair a session on The Material Dimensions of Ancient Philosophy and Science.
  • Prof. Andrew Gregory will chair a session on Early Greek Philosophies of Nature.

Paper proposals are welcomed for all of these sessions.

Papers generally will be 20 minutes with 10 minutes for discussion though some papers may be invited to give longer presentations.

There is a website for this conference at:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 09/26/2018 - 9:00am by Erik Shell.

Solmsen Fellowships 

The Institute for Research in the Humanities of the University of Wisconsin-Madison will offer five Solmsen Fellowships for 2019-2020 to be awarded to scholars from outside UW-Madison. Through a generous bequest from Friedrich and Lieselotte Solmsen, the Solmsen Fellowships sponsor scholars working in the humanities on European history, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, art and culture in the classical, medieval, and/or early modern periods before 1700. Projects on the relationship of pre-1700 Europe to other parts of the world are also welcome. The Solmsen Fellowship does not typically support editions or translations. 

Solmsen Fellows are expected to be in residence throughout the academic year (except for short research trips, lectures, conferences, etc.) and may extend their residency through the following summer on a non-stipendary basis. However, the fellowship may not be deferred for any reason. The award provides a stipend of $55,000, office space, support services, and access to all university facilities.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 09/25/2018 - 12:28pm by Erik Shell.
"Authority in Creating Contemporary Narratives About the Classics"
 
School of History, Classics and Archaeology
Newcastle University, 21-22 February 2019

The current boom of works and media about the Ancient World aimed at a general audience is a product of some converging circumstances: the rethinking of meaning and value of the Classics among scholars, in need of justifying our very own existence in contemporary academia; a market-driven demand for either recalling Western tradition and exempla from the ancients – on the conservative side, or questioning the multiple facets of elite privilege – on a progressive approach; and ultimately as a consequence of the “explosion of information” in the hyper-connected XXI century. In this last regard, narratives from non-scholars ranging from fairly accurate Wikipedia articles to “fake news” tweets are now competing with classicists for space and authority.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 09/25/2018 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.

SCS Digital Project Reviews

Since October 2016, the SCS Communications Committee has been responsible for the editing and publication of a number of Digital Project Reviews on the front page of the SCS website. These have appeared alongside SCS blog postings. As of October 1, 2018, the editing and review of Digital Project Reviews will be handled by a special editorial board, working under the aegis of the Publications and Research division of SCS. This will enable the Communications Committee to focus on blog posts of broad interest, while the new editorial board will be responsible for reviews of digital projects, tools, and resources in the field of Classics. Should you wish to submit a Digital Project Review or suggest a project to be reviewed, please see the SCS guidelines here.  Digital Project Reviews will continue to be published on the front page of the SCS website.

The members of the Digital Project Reviews Editorial Board are:

  • Scott Arcenas
  • Chris Francese (chair)
  • Ivy Livingston
  • Matthew Loar
  • Donald Mastronarde (ex officio)
View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 09/24/2018 - 10:11am by Erik Shell.

SEX, GENDER, AND SCIENCE IN ANCIENT GREECE

Sex and gender are problematic concepts in contemporary scholarship, and we should expect them to be even more so when speaking of ancient Greece.  Even the concept of science is problematic, though less so than sex and gender. ‘Sex’, used in the biological sense, is derived from French and Latin and does not appear before the 14th century CE. ‘Gender’ is also derived from French and appears first in the 14th century CE in the grammatical sense.  ‘Science’ is, of course, a transliteration of a Latin expression, and when we speak of ancient science we refer to an enterprise that differs markedly from our contemporary practices.  

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 09/24/2018 - 9:24am by Erik Shell.

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