CONF: International Conference Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World

Deadline: August 31, 2013

With the goal of promoting and encouraging a critical reflection on the permanence of personages, values and perspectives from the ancient and medieval world(s) in western literature and culture, the Research Area "Classical Antiquity: Texts and Contexts" of the Center for Classical Studies, in collaboration with the Center of History, of the Faculty of Letters of the University of Lisbon, is organising an international conference on "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World".

The conference, to be held February 17-19, 2014, aims at bringing together different fields of research to deal with the theme of violence and its multiple interpretations, representations and narratives in the ancient and medieval worlds.

Having in mind this interdisciplinary approach, the international conference "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World" has the purpose of:

  • approaching the criteria/standards of violence in the historical and literary contexts of Antiquity and the Middle Ages;
  • examining representations and readings of violence in literature and material culture;
  • pondering the ancient and medieval worlds as stages of violence in its various manifestations.

Abstracts

The conference organisers invite paper proposals on the topic "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World". We welcome abstracts on the following subtopics from all social and human sciences:

  • violence and war
  • violence and law
  • violence and politics
  • violence and familiar bounds
  • violence and sexuality
  • violence and religion
  • violence and myth
  • rhetorics of violence.

The conference will include plenary lectures by guest speakers and thematic parallel sessions for registered delegates.

  • Working languages: Portuguese, English, French and Spanish.
  • Papers: 20 minutes
  • We welcome:
    • individual proposals for a 20-minute paper (ca. 500 words);
    • joint proposals for thematic panels consisting of 3 papers (ca. 350 words per paper)

Please include the following information with your proposal:

  1. the full title of your paper / of your panel and respective papers;
  2. abstract (ca. 500 words per paper), eventually with a short list of bibliographical references;
  3. a short biographical note (ca. 200 words).

All paper proposals will be peer-reviewed.

Selected papers delivered at the conference will be eligible for publication.

Deadline for proposals: August 31, 2013

Notification of acceptance: October 15, 2013

Please submit your abstract:

  • by e-mail (saved in MS Word or PDF format): violencia.mantmed@gmail.com (subject header: Abstract proposal)
  • by post:
    International Conference "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World"
    A/C Centro de Estudos Clássicos OR Centro de História
    Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Lisboa – Alameda da Universidade
    1600-214 Lisboa
    Portugal

Registration

  • Registration: 120 Euros
  • Student fee: 10 Euros
  • Other delegates (entitled to conference materials and certificate of attendance): 20 Euros

Notes

  • International presenters should make the payment on the first day of the conference. The participation fee includes refreshments during coffee breaks and conference proceedings.
  • All speakers are responsible for their own travel arrangements and accommodation; relevant information about hotels will be provided later.

Organising committee (University of Lisbon)

  • Professor Cristina Pimentel, Professor José Varandas, Professor Nuno Simões Rodrigues, Gabriel Silva, Ivan Figueiras, Luísa Resende, Martim Horta, Ricardo Duarte.

Scientific Committee

  • Professor Ana Maria Rodrigues (University of Lisbon)
  • Professor Arnaldo do Espírito Santo (University of Lisbon)
  • Professor Carmen Morenilla (University of Valencia)
  • Professor Cristina Pimentel (University of Lisbon)
  • Professor José Ramos (University of Lisbon)
  • Professor Nuno Simões Rodrigues (University of Lisbon)
  • Professor Paolo Fedeli (University of Bari)

Contacts

International Conference "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World"
Centro de Estudos Clássicos / Centro de História
Faculdade de Letras
Cidade Universitária
1600-214 LISBOA
PORTUGAL

TEL (351) 217920005 FAX (351) 217920080 (CEC)

TEL (351) 217920000 FAX (351) 217960063 (CH)

E-mail: violencia.mantmed@gmail.com

Website: http://www.fl.ul.pt/cec/2071-violence-in-the-ancient-and-medieval-world

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