CONF: Symposium Cumanum 2013

The program for the 2013 edition of the Symposium Cumanum (June 25-27) has been set. If you would like to attend please use the link below. One can also send queries to
charles.gladhill@mcgill.ca
.

http://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/

“Aeneid Six and Its Cultural Reception”

Villa Vergiliana, Cumae and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy
June 25-27

Sponsored by The Vergilian Society, Harry Wilks Study Center,  Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici University of Naples Federico  II,   British Virgil Society, McGill University,
Accademia Virgiliana di Mantova.

Program

June 24

Cocktails (7:00pm) and Dinner (7:30pm)

June 25

Breakfast (7:30 am)

Greetings and Introduction (9:30-1030)

Session one (10:30-11:45): Pasts of Aeneid Six

  • Emily Gowers (Cambridge University)
    “Why isn’t Homer in Virgil’s Underworld?- and other notable absences.”
  • Massimo Giuseppetti (Roma Tre University)
    “L’eroe e l’aldilà: Virgilio di fronte ai suoi modelli greci.”
  • Jelena Pilipovic (Belgrade University)
    Lumen purpureum: A comparative interpretation of Vergil’s description of Elysium in the Aeneid 6 and Plato’s description of earth below the heaven in the Phaedo.”
  • Fabio Stok (Università Di Roma Tor Vergata)
    “Peccatori e punizioni dell’ Oltretomba virgiliano nell’ esegesi tardoantica.”

Coffee Break (11:45-12:00)

Session Two (12:00-1:40): Performance and Afterlife in Vergil’s Underworld

  • Micah Myers (North Carolina State University)
    “Vergil’s Underworld and the Afterlife of Love Poets.”
  • Francisco Edi Sousa (Universidade Federal do Ceará)
    “Cynthie aux enfers de Virgile: réception de l’Énéide VI dan l’élégie 4.7 Properce.”
  • Lauren Curtis (Harvard University)
    “Paradise and Performance in Virgil’s Underworld and Horace’s Carmen Saeculare.
  • Ioannis Ziogas (The Australian National University)
    “Singing for Octavia: Vergil’s Life and Marcellus’ Death.

Lunch (1:45-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:15): Romanizing the Underworld

  • Alessandro Schiesaro (Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza")
    “Virgil’s Lucretian Underworld”
  • Sarah Spence (University of Georgia)
    paci imponere morem and the role of discernment in Aeneid 6.”
  • Alison Keith (University of Toronto)
    Vergilian Underworlds in Ovid

Coffee Break (4:15)

Session Four (4:30-6:00): Aeneid Six in Imperial Poetry

  • John Schafer (Northwestern University)
    “Seneca’s Book 6.”
  • Emily Pillinger (King’s College London)
    Statius and the Sibylline (Information) Superhighway.
  • Damien Nelis (Université de Genève)
    "Sailing to Hades: Aeneid 6 in the Argonautica of Valerius Flaccus."

C.I.E.E Naples Meeting (6:30)
Serena Fusco (Resident Director, CIEE Study Center) and interested colleagues.

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 26

Breakfast (7:30)

Session 1 (9:00-10:15): Aeneid Six in Late Antiquity

  • Moa Elisabeth Ekbom (Uppsala University)
    “The reception of Aeneid VI in the Historia Augusta: Prophecy, poignancy, and puns.”
  • Gaetano Bevelacqua, (King’s College London)
    “The Use and Reception of Aeneid Six in Late Antique and Early Medieval Epigraphy.
  • Gabriela Ryser (University of Göttingen)
    Impia Tartara: Receptions of Aeneid VI in Late Antique Epic Poems.”

Session 2 (10:15-11:30): Christian Peregrinations in Vergil's Hell

  • Tom Zanker (Harvard University)
    Aeneid VI and the Divinae Institutiones of Lactantius.
  • Jacob Mackey (Queens College CUNY)
    "The Silence of Aeneid 6 in Augustine's Confessions."
  • Andrea Doyle (University of Johannesburg)
    “The Sibyl of Cumae: A journey in text and image from Virgil to Michelangelo and beyond.”

Coffee break (11:30-11:40)

Session 3 (11:40-1:15): Aeneid Six and its Commentators

  • Anna Jourbina (Gorky Institute of World Literature of Russian Academy of Science)
    “Fulgentius and his Exposition of the Content of Vergil: Gathering Knowledge in the Underworld.”
  • Adrian Mihai (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
    “L’ au-delà du livre VI de l’ Énéide de Virgile dans le miroir du Néoplatonisme latin.
  • Séverine Clément-Tarantino (Lille 3 Charles de Gaulle)
    “La lecture du chant VI de l’ Énéide selon Tiberius Claudius Donat: une reception singulière-une lecture sans reception?”
  • Luigi Galasso (Università di Pavia)
    “Some Aspects of the commentary by Norden on Book VI of the Aeneid.”

Lunch (1:15-2:15)

Session 4 (2:15-3:30): Aeneid Six and Memorialization of the Dead

  • Nandini Pandey (Loyola University Maryland)
    “Some Architectural ‘Ghosts’ and Their Reader Reception in Aeneid 6.”
  • Ourania Molyviati (Thessaloniki Greece)
    “Reconfiguring Aeneid VI: Elysium and the Campus Martius of Rome.
  • Linda Robertson (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
    “To pull history through to the present: The Aeneid and Artistic Design of the National September 11 memorial and museum.

Coffee Break (3:30-3:45)

Session 5 (3:45-5:30):  Tracking Aeneid Six from the Renaissance to Modernity

  • Matteo Soranzo (McGill University)
    “Exploring the Forests of Antiquity: The Golden Bough in Renaissance Literature.”
  • Valentina Prosperi (Università degli Studi di Sassari)
    “Virgilian Katabasis and Trojan Genealogy in Early Modern Italian Poetry.”
  • Ippokratis Kantzios (University of South Florida)
    “Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid VI.”
  • Hallie Marshall (University of British Columbia)
    “’My Mind moves upon silence and Aeneid VI’: the silent void in Classical Reception.”

Keynote Address (6:00-6:45)

  • Alessandro Barchiesi (University of Siena at Arezzo/Stanford University)
    “Into the Woods”

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 27

Breakfast (7:00)

Travel to Naples (8:00-9:00)

Session 1 (9:45-11:30) Virgilio e la Campania nella ricerca dipartimentale
Chair e introduce Dir. Arturo De Vivo

  • Valeria Viparelli
    “Tracciabilità del patrimonio culturale della Campania.”
  • Marisa Squillante
    “BibCLat Biblioteca digitalizzata Commentari Latini.”
  • Giancarlo Abbamonte
    “Letture lessicografiche di Virgilio e dei suoi commentatori nel XV secolo.”
  • Concetta Longobardi (Postgraduate)
    “I commentatori virgiliani e la localizzazione cumana di Dedalo”

Coffee Break (11:30-11:45)

Session 2 (11:45-1:30): Aeneid Six, Inspiration and the Soul

  • Renaud Gangé (Cambridge University)
    “The Sibyl and Oracular Poetry.”
  • Bill Gladhill (McGill University)
    “Situating the Soul in Vergil’s Aeneid.”
  • Grant Parker (Stanford University)
    “Spiritualist Philology.”
  • Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
    “Ritual Readings of Aeneid VI: Mystics and Skeptics.”

Lunch Break (1:30-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:00): Literary Reincarnations

  • Joseph Farrell (University of Pennsylvania)
    “Reading the Vergilian Underworld through Dante and Homer”
  • Maggie Kilgour (McGill University)
    “The Afterlife’s Afterlife”
  • Philip Hardie (Cambridge University)
    “Some Early Modern Afterlives of the Virgilian Underworld”

Tour of the Underground City (5:00-6:30)

Return trip to Villa (6:30)

Dinner (7:30)

 

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Romans across the city this week remembered the anniversary of the rastrellamento within the Jewish ghetto in Rome on October 16, 1943 carried out by 365 Nazi officers at the order of SS Captain Theodor Dannecker. Italians often refer to it as 'la spietata caccia agli ebrei' (“the ruthless hunting down of the Jews”). During the raid, 1,022 Jewish Romans were gathered and sent to the Collegio Militare in Palazzo Salviati in Trastevere, just a few hundred meters from Vatican city and the papal residence. Most of these Romans were sent to Auschwitz on sealed trains that left from Tiburtina station. Most would die in the gas chambers there. Only 15 men and 1 woman survived the camps and returned back to Italy alive.




Figure 1: Archival photo of the deportation of Jews from the city of Rome on October 16, 1943 near the Porticus Octaviae. (Photo in the Public Domain).

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/18/2019 - 6:34am by Sarah E. Bond.

ANCHORING TECHNOLOGY IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY

An interdisciplinary conference
Soeterbeeck (Radboud University), 10-13 December 2020

‘Anchoring Innovation’ is a Dutch research program in Classics that studies how people deal with ‘the new’ (http://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation/). We want to understand the multifarious ways in which relevant social groups connect what they perceive as new to what they feel is already familiar (‘anchoring’). In this conference, our focus will be on technological innovations in classical antiquity, and the ways in which these became acceptable, were adopted, and spread – or died an unceremonious death.

Technology is here understood in the widest sense of the word: it includes building materials and techniques, technical procedures and products, but also information technologies such as writing and calculating, coinage, medicine and military technology. Greco-Roman antiquity offers an ideal testing ground for understanding technological change in a complex, yet non-modern society: it is richly documented (both in the written record and in material remains), and the ‘sources’ are complex but also well-disclosed, which enables us to tackle complex research questions.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 10/17/2019 - 8:31am by Erik Shell.

On October 13, 2019, the SCS Board of Directors approved the following letter addressed to the Board of Directors of the Paideia Institute for Humanistic Study, Inc.

"The Society for Classical Studies joins the American Classical League in expressing deep concern in response to recent public statements regarding the Paideia Institute. Some of those statements are authored by individuals who have been closely associated with Paideia in various capacities and who have now resigned from the Institute.  Some of the published allegations are more generally about the Institute’s cultural climate, while others concern specific incidents. All the allegations are serious.

Accordingly, the SCS board of directors has approved a temporary hiatus on new funding for Paideia programs, including but not limited to support via the SCS Minority Scholarships, Coffin Fellowships, and Classics Everywhere micro-grants.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Mon, 10/14/2019 - 12:59pm by Helen Cullyer.

Years of restoration work on the Palatine Hill and in the Roman Forum which—together with the Colosseum—now make up the Parco Archeologico del Colosseo has been coming to fruition over the last few years. After decades of sporadic work, rusting scaffolding, and locked gates, a fabulous flurry of activity has yielded an ever greater number of visitable sites.

Many of these are accessible as part of the SUPER ticket, which provides access to the Palatine Hill and the Roman Forum (but not the Colosseum), and includes access to eight excellent “bonus” sites: Santa Maria Antiqua, Temple of Romulus, Palatine Museum, the Neronian Cryptoporticus, the Aula Isiaca and Loggia Mattei, the Houses of Augustus and Livia, and—most recently—the Domus Transitoria.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/11/2019 - 12:13am by Agnes Crawford.

Departmental memberships for 2020 are now available. This year's departmental membership includes new publication options as well as the ability to purchase membership for students and contingent faculty.

You can download the form here, then send it to the SCS office through fax or via email at info@classicalstudies.org

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/10/2019 - 10:38am by Erik Shell.

"Space and Governance: Towards a New Topography of Roman Administration"

Conference, 3-4 April 2020, Royal Academy of Spain at Rome (Real Academia de España en Roma)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 10/10/2019 - 8:53am by Erik Shell.

Call for Volunteers

The Society for Classical Studies seeks graduate, undergraduate, and contingent faculty volunteers for the 151th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., which will take place this coming January.  Assignments will include working in the registration area and assisting staff with some sessions and special events.

You can sign up to volunteer here.

In exchange for six hours of service (either in one continuous or in segmented assignments), volunteers receive a waiver of their annual meeting registration fees.  It is not necessary to be an SCS member to volunteer.

For more information about the meeting itself, visit our Annual Meeting page.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 10/07/2019 - 10:25am by Erik Shell.

In response to problems and needs, some long-term and others exposed by events at San Diego, the SCS Board of Directors has voted to add an Equity Adviser to the SCS board as an advisory member, with voice but without vote. This will be a three-year appointment made by the President, upon approval of the directors. The position will replace on the board, as of January 5, 2020, the current chair of the Strategic Development Committee, who currently serves as an ex officio board member with voice but without vote. The Strategic Development Committee itself is being wound down as part of an attempt to rationalize our governance structure. This change will not affect the 16 elected board positions.

The main roles of the Equity Adviser (hereafter EA) will be to promote diversity, inclusion, and equity in all SCS activities, looking especially at elections, governance, publications, and the annual meeting.  The EA will consult with the Committee on Professional Matters to obtain an accurate understanding of topics and data relating to diversity, inclusion, and equity across the organization. This would be particularly important in the first year of an EA’s appointment, as the adviser assesses historical trends in diversity relating to:

1) our Board of Directors and our committees;

2) the program of our annual meeting, and its actual realization; and

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 10/04/2019 - 2:35pm by Erik Shell.

ANCHORING TECHNOLOGY IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY

An interdisciplinary conference
Soeterbeeck (Radboud University), 10-13 December 2020

‘Anchoring Innovation’ is a Dutch research program in Classics that studies how people deal with ‘the new’ (http://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation/). We want to understand the multifarious ways in which relevant social groups connect what they perceive as new to what they feel is already familiar (‘anchoring’). In this conference, our focus will be on technological innovations in classical antiquity, and the ways in which these became acceptable, were adopted, and spread – or died an unceremonious death.

Technology is here understood in the widest sense of the word: it includes building materials and techniques, technical procedures and products, but also information technologies such as writing and calculating, coinage, medicine and military technology. Greco-Roman antiquity offers an ideal testing ground for understanding technological change in a complex, yet non-modern society: it is richly documented (both in the written record and in material remains), and the ‘sources’ are complex but also well-disclosed, which enables us to tackle complex research questions.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/04/2019 - 1:24pm by Erik Shell.

In the past year, the Society for Classical Studies website has published a number of pieces catalyzed by the blatant racism on display at the most recent annual meeting. Professor Joy Connolly wrote a piece called “Working Toward a Just and Inclusive Future for Classics,” which then generated a response by an anonymous graduate student group, which in turn led to further comment by the SCS, Professor Connolly, and the newly formed SCS Graduate Student Committee. These various pieces pointed to ways Classics could progress and thrive for generations to come. 

What became lost in this series of posts was a focus on racial diversity and inclusivity, as the conversation increasingly broadened to include all manner of injustice found in academic work conditions. The act of racism that started the conversation became overshadowed by much more general discussion about problems that affect the whole of academia, e.g., the increasing precarity of academic labor.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 10/04/2019 - 6:33am by Joy Reeber.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
ANCHORING TECHNOLOGY IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY
Public Statements
On October 13, 2019, the SCS Board of Directors approved the following letter
SCS Announcements
Departmental memberships for 2020 are now available.
Calls for Papers
"Space and Governance: Towards a New Topography of Roman Administration"

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy