CONF: Symposium Cumanum 2013

The program for the 2013 edition of the Symposium Cumanum (June 25-27) has been set. If you would like to attend please use the link below. One can also send queries to
charles.gladhill@mcgill.ca
.

http://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/

“Aeneid Six and Its Cultural Reception”

Villa Vergiliana, Cumae and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy
June 25-27

Sponsored by The Vergilian Society, Harry Wilks Study Center,  Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici University of Naples Federico  II,   British Virgil Society, McGill University,
Accademia Virgiliana di Mantova.

Program

June 24

Cocktails (7:00pm) and Dinner (7:30pm)

June 25

Breakfast (7:30 am)

Greetings and Introduction (9:30-1030)

Session one (10:30-11:45): Pasts of Aeneid Six

  • Emily Gowers (Cambridge University)
    “Why isn’t Homer in Virgil’s Underworld?- and other notable absences.”
  • Massimo Giuseppetti (Roma Tre University)
    “L’eroe e l’aldilà: Virgilio di fronte ai suoi modelli greci.”
  • Jelena Pilipovic (Belgrade University)
    Lumen purpureum: A comparative interpretation of Vergil’s description of Elysium in the Aeneid 6 and Plato’s description of earth below the heaven in the Phaedo.”
  • Fabio Stok (Università Di Roma Tor Vergata)
    “Peccatori e punizioni dell’ Oltretomba virgiliano nell’ esegesi tardoantica.”

Coffee Break (11:45-12:00)

Session Two (12:00-1:40): Performance and Afterlife in Vergil’s Underworld

  • Micah Myers (North Carolina State University)
    “Vergil’s Underworld and the Afterlife of Love Poets.”
  • Francisco Edi Sousa (Universidade Federal do Ceará)
    “Cynthie aux enfers de Virgile: réception de l’Énéide VI dan l’élégie 4.7 Properce.”
  • Lauren Curtis (Harvard University)
    “Paradise and Performance in Virgil’s Underworld and Horace’s Carmen Saeculare.
  • Ioannis Ziogas (The Australian National University)
    “Singing for Octavia: Vergil’s Life and Marcellus’ Death.

Lunch (1:45-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:15): Romanizing the Underworld

  • Alessandro Schiesaro (Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza")
    “Virgil’s Lucretian Underworld”
  • Sarah Spence (University of Georgia)
    paci imponere morem and the role of discernment in Aeneid 6.”
  • Alison Keith (University of Toronto)
    Vergilian Underworlds in Ovid

Coffee Break (4:15)

Session Four (4:30-6:00): Aeneid Six in Imperial Poetry

  • John Schafer (Northwestern University)
    “Seneca’s Book 6.”
  • Emily Pillinger (King’s College London)
    Statius and the Sibylline (Information) Superhighway.
  • Damien Nelis (Université de Genève)
    "Sailing to Hades: Aeneid 6 in the Argonautica of Valerius Flaccus."

C.I.E.E Naples Meeting (6:30)
Serena Fusco (Resident Director, CIEE Study Center) and interested colleagues.

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 26

Breakfast (7:30)

Session 1 (9:00-10:15): Aeneid Six in Late Antiquity

  • Moa Elisabeth Ekbom (Uppsala University)
    “The reception of Aeneid VI in the Historia Augusta: Prophecy, poignancy, and puns.”
  • Gaetano Bevelacqua, (King’s College London)
    “The Use and Reception of Aeneid Six in Late Antique and Early Medieval Epigraphy.
  • Gabriela Ryser (University of Göttingen)
    Impia Tartara: Receptions of Aeneid VI in Late Antique Epic Poems.”

Session 2 (10:15-11:30): Christian Peregrinations in Vergil's Hell

  • Tom Zanker (Harvard University)
    Aeneid VI and the Divinae Institutiones of Lactantius.
  • Jacob Mackey (Queens College CUNY)
    "The Silence of Aeneid 6 in Augustine's Confessions."
  • Andrea Doyle (University of Johannesburg)
    “The Sibyl of Cumae: A journey in text and image from Virgil to Michelangelo and beyond.”

Coffee break (11:30-11:40)

Session 3 (11:40-1:15): Aeneid Six and its Commentators

  • Anna Jourbina (Gorky Institute of World Literature of Russian Academy of Science)
    “Fulgentius and his Exposition of the Content of Vergil: Gathering Knowledge in the Underworld.”
  • Adrian Mihai (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
    “L’ au-delà du livre VI de l’ Énéide de Virgile dans le miroir du Néoplatonisme latin.
  • Séverine Clément-Tarantino (Lille 3 Charles de Gaulle)
    “La lecture du chant VI de l’ Énéide selon Tiberius Claudius Donat: une reception singulière-une lecture sans reception?”
  • Luigi Galasso (Università di Pavia)
    “Some Aspects of the commentary by Norden on Book VI of the Aeneid.”

Lunch (1:15-2:15)

Session 4 (2:15-3:30): Aeneid Six and Memorialization of the Dead

  • Nandini Pandey (Loyola University Maryland)
    “Some Architectural ‘Ghosts’ and Their Reader Reception in Aeneid 6.”
  • Ourania Molyviati (Thessaloniki Greece)
    “Reconfiguring Aeneid VI: Elysium and the Campus Martius of Rome.
  • Linda Robertson (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
    “To pull history through to the present: The Aeneid and Artistic Design of the National September 11 memorial and museum.

Coffee Break (3:30-3:45)

Session 5 (3:45-5:30):  Tracking Aeneid Six from the Renaissance to Modernity

  • Matteo Soranzo (McGill University)
    “Exploring the Forests of Antiquity: The Golden Bough in Renaissance Literature.”
  • Valentina Prosperi (Università degli Studi di Sassari)
    “Virgilian Katabasis and Trojan Genealogy in Early Modern Italian Poetry.”
  • Ippokratis Kantzios (University of South Florida)
    “Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid VI.”
  • Hallie Marshall (University of British Columbia)
    “’My Mind moves upon silence and Aeneid VI’: the silent void in Classical Reception.”

Keynote Address (6:00-6:45)

  • Alessandro Barchiesi (University of Siena at Arezzo/Stanford University)
    “Into the Woods”

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 27

Breakfast (7:00)

Travel to Naples (8:00-9:00)

Session 1 (9:45-11:30) Virgilio e la Campania nella ricerca dipartimentale
Chair e introduce Dir. Arturo De Vivo

  • Valeria Viparelli
    “Tracciabilità del patrimonio culturale della Campania.”
  • Marisa Squillante
    “BibCLat Biblioteca digitalizzata Commentari Latini.”
  • Giancarlo Abbamonte
    “Letture lessicografiche di Virgilio e dei suoi commentatori nel XV secolo.”
  • Concetta Longobardi (Postgraduate)
    “I commentatori virgiliani e la localizzazione cumana di Dedalo”

Coffee Break (11:30-11:45)

Session 2 (11:45-1:30): Aeneid Six, Inspiration and the Soul

  • Renaud Gangé (Cambridge University)
    “The Sibyl and Oracular Poetry.”
  • Bill Gladhill (McGill University)
    “Situating the Soul in Vergil’s Aeneid.”
  • Grant Parker (Stanford University)
    “Spiritualist Philology.”
  • Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
    “Ritual Readings of Aeneid VI: Mystics and Skeptics.”

Lunch Break (1:30-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:00): Literary Reincarnations

  • Joseph Farrell (University of Pennsylvania)
    “Reading the Vergilian Underworld through Dante and Homer”
  • Maggie Kilgour (McGill University)
    “The Afterlife’s Afterlife”
  • Philip Hardie (Cambridge University)
    “Some Early Modern Afterlives of the Virgilian Underworld”

Tour of the Underground City (5:00-6:30)

Return trip to Villa (6:30)

Dinner (7:30)

 

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In light of the present administration’s brazen disregard for facts and the public good, you’ve got to admire past leaders’ nonpartisan concern to preserve knowledge for the future. 

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 07/10/2020 - 9:04am by Nandini Pandey.

The SCS Board has joined many other scholarly societies in endorsing this letter imploring the federal government to "reinstate the temporary visa exemptions for international students and faculty members while we are in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, including at least the Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 semesters."

You can read more at the link above.

If you want to take action, please consult the National Humanities Alliance's action alert on the issue here.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 07/09/2020 - 6:46am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers

February 27th, 2021

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL)

Fourth University of Florida Classics Graduate Student Symposium

The mythology of different cultures has left a lasting impression on societies across the globe, from the Ancient Greek tragic tradition to 21st-century American superhero movies and brand names. Permeating the world of economics, politics, literature, and entertainment, the enduring quality of mythology hearkens back to the human desire to justify the esoteric and to explain the unknown. In our world of scientific and technological advancements, what place does mythology still hold? We seek to answer that question by gaining insight into the significance of myth in multiple cultures and communities around the world.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 07/07/2020 - 10:33am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers

The Fourteenth Conference on Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World will take place in Jerusalem (Israel) from Sunday 20 June 2021 to Wednesday 23 June 2021. Classicists, historians, students of comparative religion, the Hebrew Bible, early Christian and Rabbinic traditions, as well as scholars in other fields with an interest in oral cultures are cordially invited.

The conference will follow the same format as the previous conferences, held in Hobart (1994), Durban (1996), Wellington (1998), Columbia, Missouri (2000), Melbourne (2002), Winnipeg (2004), Auckland (2006), Nijmegen (2008), Canberra (2010), Ann Arbor (2012), Atlanta (2014), Lausanne (2016), and Austin TX (2019). It is planned that the refereed proceedings once again be published by E.J. Brill in the “Orality and Literacy in the Ancient World” series.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 07/07/2020 - 7:28am by Erik Shell.

Body and Medicine in Latin Poetry’, which will take place online on the 17th and 18th September 2020. 

The ongoing epidemic crisis brought forth by the spread of Covid-19 compels us to rethink the concepts of body and disease in light of  their effect on human nature, as well as seek new methods to cope with the sense of anxiety and vulnerability generated by such pandemic diseases. 

This conference will navigate the relationship between Medical Science and Humanities in Antiquity, with papers exploring how medicine can be integrated into poetry and how poetry, in turn, can propagate medical knowledge across various social classes and cultural contexts. Further to that, the conference will explore the extent to which such a relationship reflects our individual concerns about the validity and consistence of medicine as a science of the Human.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 07/06/2020 - 5:57am by Erik Shell.

Finishing my third trimester in the midst of a pandemic was not what I had planned for the last months of pregnancy. Since the Ides of March, we have sequestered ourselves in our house in Iowa City and cancelled any and all social gatherings––including the planned baby shower––as has almost everyone else across the globe. Although I lamented not being able to celebrate with family and friends in person, every day it seemed, small book-shaped cardboard boxes began to populate the front stoop. Their opening revealed that our academic friends had sent us their favorite books in hopes that reading to our little one might bring comfort, amusement, and maybe a little sleep into our lives. As her library began to grow with the reading selections of our fellow classicists, archaeologists, and university librarians, the broad selection of children’s books focused on the ancient Mediterranean became apparent.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 07/03/2020 - 9:28am by Sarah E. Bond.

The new Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities worldwide with the study of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. As part of this initiative the SCS has been funding a variety of projects ranging from reading groups comparing ancient to modern leadership practices to collaborations with artists in theater, music, and dance. This post centers on projects that promote emotional well-being and use Greek texts to facilitate conversations on current social justice issues, from New York to Chicago and San Francisco.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 06/26/2020 - 7:31am by .

Dear members (and past Annual Meeting participants),

After extensive research and discussion, AIA and SCS staff and officers have decided that the January 2021 Joint Annual Meeting scheduled to take place from January 7-10 in Chicago will now be a virtual event. We know that many of you were looking forward to attending paper sessions and other events, to seeing old friends and colleagues, and to making new connections and we recognize that a virtual event cannot substitute in many ways for a face-to-face experience. However, after full consideration of the public health risks and significant impact of COVID-19 on the ability of most of you to travel to and participate in a large conference in the upcoming months, AIA and SCS have decided that a virtual event is the most prudent course.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 06/25/2020 - 7:13am by Helen Cullyer.

In 2018, a group of scholars founded Mountaintop Coalition, an SCS-affiliated group with a shared interest in advancing the professional goals of Classicists who identify as members of ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in the field. Mountaintop’s activities focus on practical issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, and access in professional settings.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 06/19/2020 - 8:30am by Samuel Ortencio Flores.

Froma I. Zeitlin retired from Princeton University in 2010, where she was the Charles Ewing Professor of Greek Language and Literature in the Department of Classics and Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature. Dr. Zeitlin received her B.A. from Radcliffe-Harvard in 1954 and her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1970. She is a specialist in Greek literature from Homer to late antiquity, with particular interests in epic, drama and prose fiction. Her publications include Under the Sign of the Shield: Semiotics and Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes (1982; 2d ed.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 06/12/2020 - 8:50am by Claire Catenaccio.

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