CONF: Symposium Cumanum 2013

The program for the 2013 edition of the Symposium Cumanum (June 25-27) has been set. If you would like to attend please use the link below. One can also send queries to
charles.gladhill@mcgill.ca
.

http://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/

“Aeneid Six and Its Cultural Reception”

Villa Vergiliana, Cumae and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy
June 25-27

Sponsored by The Vergilian Society, Harry Wilks Study Center,  Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici University of Naples Federico  II,   British Virgil Society, McGill University,
Accademia Virgiliana di Mantova.

Program

June 24

Cocktails (7:00pm) and Dinner (7:30pm)

June 25

Breakfast (7:30 am)

Greetings and Introduction (9:30-1030)

Session one (10:30-11:45): Pasts of Aeneid Six

  • Emily Gowers (Cambridge University)
    “Why isn’t Homer in Virgil’s Underworld?- and other notable absences.”
  • Massimo Giuseppetti (Roma Tre University)
    “L’eroe e l’aldilà: Virgilio di fronte ai suoi modelli greci.”
  • Jelena Pilipovic (Belgrade University)
    Lumen purpureum: A comparative interpretation of Vergil’s description of Elysium in the Aeneid 6 and Plato’s description of earth below the heaven in the Phaedo.”
  • Fabio Stok (Università Di Roma Tor Vergata)
    “Peccatori e punizioni dell’ Oltretomba virgiliano nell’ esegesi tardoantica.”

Coffee Break (11:45-12:00)

Session Two (12:00-1:40): Performance and Afterlife in Vergil’s Underworld

  • Micah Myers (North Carolina State University)
    “Vergil’s Underworld and the Afterlife of Love Poets.”
  • Francisco Edi Sousa (Universidade Federal do Ceará)
    “Cynthie aux enfers de Virgile: réception de l’Énéide VI dan l’élégie 4.7 Properce.”
  • Lauren Curtis (Harvard University)
    “Paradise and Performance in Virgil’s Underworld and Horace’s Carmen Saeculare.
  • Ioannis Ziogas (The Australian National University)
    “Singing for Octavia: Vergil’s Life and Marcellus’ Death.

Lunch (1:45-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:15): Romanizing the Underworld

  • Alessandro Schiesaro (Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza")
    “Virgil’s Lucretian Underworld”
  • Sarah Spence (University of Georgia)
    paci imponere morem and the role of discernment in Aeneid 6.”
  • Alison Keith (University of Toronto)
    Vergilian Underworlds in Ovid

Coffee Break (4:15)

Session Four (4:30-6:00): Aeneid Six in Imperial Poetry

  • John Schafer (Northwestern University)
    “Seneca’s Book 6.”
  • Emily Pillinger (King’s College London)
    Statius and the Sibylline (Information) Superhighway.
  • Damien Nelis (Université de Genève)
    "Sailing to Hades: Aeneid 6 in the Argonautica of Valerius Flaccus."

C.I.E.E Naples Meeting (6:30)
Serena Fusco (Resident Director, CIEE Study Center) and interested colleagues.

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 26

Breakfast (7:30)

Session 1 (9:00-10:15): Aeneid Six in Late Antiquity

  • Moa Elisabeth Ekbom (Uppsala University)
    “The reception of Aeneid VI in the Historia Augusta: Prophecy, poignancy, and puns.”
  • Gaetano Bevelacqua, (King’s College London)
    “The Use and Reception of Aeneid Six in Late Antique and Early Medieval Epigraphy.
  • Gabriela Ryser (University of Göttingen)
    Impia Tartara: Receptions of Aeneid VI in Late Antique Epic Poems.”

Session 2 (10:15-11:30): Christian Peregrinations in Vergil's Hell

  • Tom Zanker (Harvard University)
    Aeneid VI and the Divinae Institutiones of Lactantius.
  • Jacob Mackey (Queens College CUNY)
    "The Silence of Aeneid 6 in Augustine's Confessions."
  • Andrea Doyle (University of Johannesburg)
    “The Sibyl of Cumae: A journey in text and image from Virgil to Michelangelo and beyond.”

Coffee break (11:30-11:40)

Session 3 (11:40-1:15): Aeneid Six and its Commentators

  • Anna Jourbina (Gorky Institute of World Literature of Russian Academy of Science)
    “Fulgentius and his Exposition of the Content of Vergil: Gathering Knowledge in the Underworld.”
  • Adrian Mihai (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
    “L’ au-delà du livre VI de l’ Énéide de Virgile dans le miroir du Néoplatonisme latin.
  • Séverine Clément-Tarantino (Lille 3 Charles de Gaulle)
    “La lecture du chant VI de l’ Énéide selon Tiberius Claudius Donat: une reception singulière-une lecture sans reception?”
  • Luigi Galasso (Università di Pavia)
    “Some Aspects of the commentary by Norden on Book VI of the Aeneid.”

Lunch (1:15-2:15)

Session 4 (2:15-3:30): Aeneid Six and Memorialization of the Dead

  • Nandini Pandey (Loyola University Maryland)
    “Some Architectural ‘Ghosts’ and Their Reader Reception in Aeneid 6.”
  • Ourania Molyviati (Thessaloniki Greece)
    “Reconfiguring Aeneid VI: Elysium and the Campus Martius of Rome.
  • Linda Robertson (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
    “To pull history through to the present: The Aeneid and Artistic Design of the National September 11 memorial and museum.

Coffee Break (3:30-3:45)

Session 5 (3:45-5:30):  Tracking Aeneid Six from the Renaissance to Modernity

  • Matteo Soranzo (McGill University)
    “Exploring the Forests of Antiquity: The Golden Bough in Renaissance Literature.”
  • Valentina Prosperi (Università degli Studi di Sassari)
    “Virgilian Katabasis and Trojan Genealogy in Early Modern Italian Poetry.”
  • Ippokratis Kantzios (University of South Florida)
    “Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid VI.”
  • Hallie Marshall (University of British Columbia)
    “’My Mind moves upon silence and Aeneid VI’: the silent void in Classical Reception.”

Keynote Address (6:00-6:45)

  • Alessandro Barchiesi (University of Siena at Arezzo/Stanford University)
    “Into the Woods”

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 27

Breakfast (7:00)

Travel to Naples (8:00-9:00)

Session 1 (9:45-11:30) Virgilio e la Campania nella ricerca dipartimentale
Chair e introduce Dir. Arturo De Vivo

  • Valeria Viparelli
    “Tracciabilità del patrimonio culturale della Campania.”
  • Marisa Squillante
    “BibCLat Biblioteca digitalizzata Commentari Latini.”
  • Giancarlo Abbamonte
    “Letture lessicografiche di Virgilio e dei suoi commentatori nel XV secolo.”
  • Concetta Longobardi (Postgraduate)
    “I commentatori virgiliani e la localizzazione cumana di Dedalo”

Coffee Break (11:30-11:45)

Session 2 (11:45-1:30): Aeneid Six, Inspiration and the Soul

  • Renaud Gangé (Cambridge University)
    “The Sibyl and Oracular Poetry.”
  • Bill Gladhill (McGill University)
    “Situating the Soul in Vergil’s Aeneid.”
  • Grant Parker (Stanford University)
    “Spiritualist Philology.”
  • Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
    “Ritual Readings of Aeneid VI: Mystics and Skeptics.”

Lunch Break (1:30-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:00): Literary Reincarnations

  • Joseph Farrell (University of Pennsylvania)
    “Reading the Vergilian Underworld through Dante and Homer”
  • Maggie Kilgour (McGill University)
    “The Afterlife’s Afterlife”
  • Philip Hardie (Cambridge University)
    “Some Early Modern Afterlives of the Virgilian Underworld”

Tour of the Underground City (5:00-6:30)

Return trip to Villa (6:30)

Dinner (7:30)

 

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Aileen R. Das

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/07/2021 - 3:26pm by Erik Shell.

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View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 10/06/2021 - 10:00am by Erik Shell.

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