CONF: Symposium Cumanum 2013

The program for the 2013 edition of the Symposium Cumanum (June 25-27) has been set. If you would like to attend please use the link below. One can also send queries to
charles.gladhill@mcgill.ca
.

http://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/

“Aeneid Six and Its Cultural Reception”

Villa Vergiliana, Cumae and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy
June 25-27

Sponsored by The Vergilian Society, Harry Wilks Study Center,  Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici University of Naples Federico  II,   British Virgil Society, McGill University,
Accademia Virgiliana di Mantova.

Program

June 24

Cocktails (7:00pm) and Dinner (7:30pm)

June 25

Breakfast (7:30 am)

Greetings and Introduction (9:30-1030)

Session one (10:30-11:45): Pasts of Aeneid Six

  • Emily Gowers (Cambridge University)
    “Why isn’t Homer in Virgil’s Underworld?- and other notable absences.”
  • Massimo Giuseppetti (Roma Tre University)
    “L’eroe e l’aldilà: Virgilio di fronte ai suoi modelli greci.”
  • Jelena Pilipovic (Belgrade University)
    Lumen purpureum: A comparative interpretation of Vergil’s description of Elysium in the Aeneid 6 and Plato’s description of earth below the heaven in the Phaedo.”
  • Fabio Stok (Università Di Roma Tor Vergata)
    “Peccatori e punizioni dell’ Oltretomba virgiliano nell’ esegesi tardoantica.”

Coffee Break (11:45-12:00)

Session Two (12:00-1:40): Performance and Afterlife in Vergil’s Underworld

  • Micah Myers (North Carolina State University)
    “Vergil’s Underworld and the Afterlife of Love Poets.”
  • Francisco Edi Sousa (Universidade Federal do Ceará)
    “Cynthie aux enfers de Virgile: réception de l’Énéide VI dan l’élégie 4.7 Properce.”
  • Lauren Curtis (Harvard University)
    “Paradise and Performance in Virgil’s Underworld and Horace’s Carmen Saeculare.
  • Ioannis Ziogas (The Australian National University)
    “Singing for Octavia: Vergil’s Life and Marcellus’ Death.

Lunch (1:45-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:15): Romanizing the Underworld

  • Alessandro Schiesaro (Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza")
    “Virgil’s Lucretian Underworld”
  • Sarah Spence (University of Georgia)
    paci imponere morem and the role of discernment in Aeneid 6.”
  • Alison Keith (University of Toronto)
    Vergilian Underworlds in Ovid

Coffee Break (4:15)

Session Four (4:30-6:00): Aeneid Six in Imperial Poetry

  • John Schafer (Northwestern University)
    “Seneca’s Book 6.”
  • Emily Pillinger (King’s College London)
    Statius and the Sibylline (Information) Superhighway.
  • Damien Nelis (Université de Genève)
    "Sailing to Hades: Aeneid 6 in the Argonautica of Valerius Flaccus."

C.I.E.E Naples Meeting (6:30)
Serena Fusco (Resident Director, CIEE Study Center) and interested colleagues.

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 26

Breakfast (7:30)

Session 1 (9:00-10:15): Aeneid Six in Late Antiquity

  • Moa Elisabeth Ekbom (Uppsala University)
    “The reception of Aeneid VI in the Historia Augusta: Prophecy, poignancy, and puns.”
  • Gaetano Bevelacqua, (King’s College London)
    “The Use and Reception of Aeneid Six in Late Antique and Early Medieval Epigraphy.
  • Gabriela Ryser (University of Göttingen)
    Impia Tartara: Receptions of Aeneid VI in Late Antique Epic Poems.”

Session 2 (10:15-11:30): Christian Peregrinations in Vergil's Hell

  • Tom Zanker (Harvard University)
    Aeneid VI and the Divinae Institutiones of Lactantius.
  • Jacob Mackey (Queens College CUNY)
    "The Silence of Aeneid 6 in Augustine's Confessions."
  • Andrea Doyle (University of Johannesburg)
    “The Sibyl of Cumae: A journey in text and image from Virgil to Michelangelo and beyond.”

Coffee break (11:30-11:40)

Session 3 (11:40-1:15): Aeneid Six and its Commentators

  • Anna Jourbina (Gorky Institute of World Literature of Russian Academy of Science)
    “Fulgentius and his Exposition of the Content of Vergil: Gathering Knowledge in the Underworld.”
  • Adrian Mihai (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
    “L’ au-delà du livre VI de l’ Énéide de Virgile dans le miroir du Néoplatonisme latin.
  • Séverine Clément-Tarantino (Lille 3 Charles de Gaulle)
    “La lecture du chant VI de l’ Énéide selon Tiberius Claudius Donat: une reception singulière-une lecture sans reception?”
  • Luigi Galasso (Università di Pavia)
    “Some Aspects of the commentary by Norden on Book VI of the Aeneid.”

Lunch (1:15-2:15)

Session 4 (2:15-3:30): Aeneid Six and Memorialization of the Dead

  • Nandini Pandey (Loyola University Maryland)
    “Some Architectural ‘Ghosts’ and Their Reader Reception in Aeneid 6.”
  • Ourania Molyviati (Thessaloniki Greece)
    “Reconfiguring Aeneid VI: Elysium and the Campus Martius of Rome.
  • Linda Robertson (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
    “To pull history through to the present: The Aeneid and Artistic Design of the National September 11 memorial and museum.

Coffee Break (3:30-3:45)

Session 5 (3:45-5:30):  Tracking Aeneid Six from the Renaissance to Modernity

  • Matteo Soranzo (McGill University)
    “Exploring the Forests of Antiquity: The Golden Bough in Renaissance Literature.”
  • Valentina Prosperi (Università degli Studi di Sassari)
    “Virgilian Katabasis and Trojan Genealogy in Early Modern Italian Poetry.”
  • Ippokratis Kantzios (University of South Florida)
    “Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid VI.”
  • Hallie Marshall (University of British Columbia)
    “’My Mind moves upon silence and Aeneid VI’: the silent void in Classical Reception.”

Keynote Address (6:00-6:45)

  • Alessandro Barchiesi (University of Siena at Arezzo/Stanford University)
    “Into the Woods”

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 27

Breakfast (7:00)

Travel to Naples (8:00-9:00)

Session 1 (9:45-11:30) Virgilio e la Campania nella ricerca dipartimentale
Chair e introduce Dir. Arturo De Vivo

  • Valeria Viparelli
    “Tracciabilità del patrimonio culturale della Campania.”
  • Marisa Squillante
    “BibCLat Biblioteca digitalizzata Commentari Latini.”
  • Giancarlo Abbamonte
    “Letture lessicografiche di Virgilio e dei suoi commentatori nel XV secolo.”
  • Concetta Longobardi (Postgraduate)
    “I commentatori virgiliani e la localizzazione cumana di Dedalo”

Coffee Break (11:30-11:45)

Session 2 (11:45-1:30): Aeneid Six, Inspiration and the Soul

  • Renaud Gangé (Cambridge University)
    “The Sibyl and Oracular Poetry.”
  • Bill Gladhill (McGill University)
    “Situating the Soul in Vergil’s Aeneid.”
  • Grant Parker (Stanford University)
    “Spiritualist Philology.”
  • Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
    “Ritual Readings of Aeneid VI: Mystics and Skeptics.”

Lunch Break (1:30-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:00): Literary Reincarnations

  • Joseph Farrell (University of Pennsylvania)
    “Reading the Vergilian Underworld through Dante and Homer”
  • Maggie Kilgour (McGill University)
    “The Afterlife’s Afterlife”
  • Philip Hardie (Cambridge University)
    “Some Early Modern Afterlives of the Virgilian Underworld”

Tour of the Underground City (5:00-6:30)

Return trip to Villa (6:30)

Dinner (7:30)

 

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From Gibbon to "Gladiator," it might seem like we know a lot about Ancient Rome, but our view of this civilization is a skewed one. The Romans lived in one of the most stratified societies in history. Around 1.5% of the population controlled the government, military, economy and religion. Through the writings and possessions they left behind, these rich, upper-class men are also responsible for most of our information about Roman life.

The remaining people – commoners, slaves and others – are largely silent. They could not afford tombstones to record their names, and they were buried with little in the way of fancy pottery or jewellery. Their lives were documented by the elites, but they left few documents of their own.

Now, Kristina Killgrove, an archaeologist from Vanderbilt University, wants to tell their story by sequencing their DNA, and she is raising donations to do it. “Their DNA will tell me where these people, who aren’t in histories, were coming from,” she says. “They were quite literally the 99% of Rome.”

Read more on the Light Years blog at http://lightyears.blogs.cnn.com/2011/11/11/who-were-the-99-of-ancient-rome/

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 11/14/2011 - 1:16am by Information Architect.

At its meeting in September 2011, the Board of Directors voted to recommend to the members that they change the By-Laws to combine the existing divisions of Publications and Research, effective January 6, 2013.  Members will be asked to vote on this change at the Annual Meeting of Members on January 8, 2012, in Philadelphia.

Current By-Law language with proposed deletions struck through and proposed additions [in brackets].

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

13.  The Board of Directors shall consist of the President, President-Elect, six[five] Vice Presidents, two Financial Trustees, six additional Directors, and Immediate Past President.  In addition, the Executive Director shall be a member of the Board of Directors with voice but without vote.  Except as may be provided otherwise by law, any Director or the entire Board of Directors may be removed, with or without cause, by a majority of the members then entitled to vote in an election duly called for that purpose.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 11/10/2011 - 12:45am by Adam Blistein.

Daniel Mendelsohn reviews Stephen Mitchell's new translation of the Iliad in the November 7th edition of The New Yorker. Read an abstract of the review online here.

View full article. | Posted in Book Reviews on Wed, 11/09/2011 - 6:09pm by Information Architect.

It has now been decided that no reduction in staff numbers in Classics at Royal Holloway will take place until the end of the academic year 2013-14.  Moreover if we recruit good numbers of students with AAB or above at A-level for 2012 and our plans to increase our numbers of Master’s students, both for our MA programmes and for our new MRes programmes, are successful, the proposal for a reduction in staff numbers is likely to be reviewed.  Validation of our two new MRes degrees, one in Rhetoric and one in Classical Reception, is in train.  For more details, see the Department’s blog at http://supportclassicsatrhul.wordpress.com and the Departmental website at www.rhul.ac.uk/ClassicsandPhilosophy.
 
We will be very pleased to receive good applications for Master’s and PhD degrees as well as for all our undergraduate programmes for September 2012.
 
Prof. Anne Sheppard
Head of Classics and Philosophy Department
Royal Holloway
University of London
Egham, Surrey  TW20 0EX

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 11/03/2011 - 1:29pm by Information Architect.

The new Placement Service web site is now available at placement.apaclassics.org.  We appreciate the patience that both candidates and hiring institutions have shown as we develop this new service.  The web site will permit both candidates and institutions to register and to submit scheduling information online and to see their schedules filled out as specific interview times are assigned.  Registered candidates will also be able to see new position listings as soon as texts of those listings are received and reviewed.  Please note that this new web site for registered candidates will only supplement – it will not replace – the traditional monthly listings of new positions that appear on the APA and AIA web sites.  The traditional listings perform a number of valuable functions for the field, but we look forward to giving active job candidates the earliest possible access to new listings. 

Candidates should be aware that we have a considerable backlog of positions already advertised that we need to enter into the new system.  The new job listing web site will therefore probably not be complete and up-to-date until the second week in November.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 10/27/2011 - 1:21pm by Adam Blistein.

"Wrestling announcer Ed Aliverti often spiced up the NCAA Division I wrestling tournament by yelling that wrestling was 'the world's oldest and greatest sport.' Prints sold at wrestling events depict biblical figure Jacob wrestling an angel, and Abraham Lincoln engaged in his own wrestling match before becoming president. The sport has always been proud of the ancient origins of the sport.

"Now, wrestling has proof of its long history, as researchers at Columbia University found an instructional manual on wrestling that dates back to 200 A.D."

Read more at Yahoo Sports…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 10/20/2011 - 7:41pm by Information Architect.

Martha Abbott, a Latin teacher with whom many APA members have collaborated, has become Executive Director of the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), a society of over 12,000 language teachers and administrators. 

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 10/19/2011 - 6:22pm by Adam Blistein.

The Aquila Theatre's Ancient Greeks/Modern Lives project has been invited to perform a staged reading of scenes from ancient Greek literature for members of the administration and Congress at the White House on November 16, 2011. Ancient Greeks/Modern Lives:  Poetry-Drama-Dialogue is a major new national public program by the Aquila Theatre of New York, supported by a prestigious Chairman's Special Award from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).  The goal of the project is to bring the veteran community and public together around performances of several ancient  works.  This fascinating free public program of staged readings, lectures, reading groups, and workshops is visiting 100 libraries, arts centers, museums, theatres and galleries across America from May 2010 to April 2013.  The APA is participating in this program by helping to recruit and train the scholars who will lead the events before and after Aquila performances.  The staged reading at the White House will include scenes from Aeschylus' Agamemnon, Sophocles' Ajax, Euripides' Herakles, and Homer's Odyssey performed by a combination of actors from Aquila and combat veterans who served in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.  The reading will be followed by a "town-hall" style discussion moderated by APA member, Peter Meineck, Aquila's Artistic Director.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 10/18/2011 - 6:58pm by Adam Blistein.

We expect the new automated APA-AIA Placement Service registration web site to be available to candidates during the week of October 17.  At that time candidates will need to register for the 2011-2012 Placement Year if they wish to continue to receive Positions for Classicists and Archaeologists, get access to a web site in which new job listings will be posted as soon as their advertisements are approved, and schedule interviews at the upcoming annual meeting.  Candidates must be either an APA member for 2011 or an AIA member in good standing and will need to enter a member number to complete the registration process. 

If you are not yet a member, you can join the APA at

http://apaclassics.org/index.php/membership

or you can join the AIA at

http://www.archaeological.org/membership/join

If you have already joined one of the societies, please visit this web site to obtain an APA member number,

http://apa.press.jhu.edu/cgi-bin/member_number_lookup.cgi

AIA member numbers appear on the membership card and can be obtained from Membership@aia.bu.edu

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/12/2011 - 6:25pm by Adam Blistein.

APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED

The APA Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance (CAMP) solicits applications from APA members interested in serving as local scholars for Aquila Theatre’s Ancient Greeks/Modern Lives: Poetry-Drama-Dialogue program, an important new nationwide partnership between libraries and the theatre supported by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The program will have an additional focus on cross-cultural impact relating to the African-American, Asian-American and Latino experience and a special emphasis on veterans and their families and will be guided by consultants specializing in these areas. Ancient Greeks/Modern Lives will travel to 100 library and arts center locations nationwide.  Program details are available on the project web site.

Scholars are particularly needed who are within the vicinity of or able to travel to the following areas:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 10/07/2011 - 7:20pm by Adam Blistein.

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