CONF: Symposium Cumanum 2013

The program for the 2013 edition of the Symposium Cumanum (June 25-27) has been set. If you would like to attend please use the link below. One can also send queries to
charles.gladhill@mcgill.ca
.

http://www.vergiliansociety.org/symposium_cumanum/

“Aeneid Six and Its Cultural Reception”

Villa Vergiliana, Cumae and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy
June 25-27

Sponsored by The Vergilian Society, Harry Wilks Study Center,  Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici University of Naples Federico  II,   British Virgil Society, McGill University,
Accademia Virgiliana di Mantova.

Program

June 24

Cocktails (7:00pm) and Dinner (7:30pm)

June 25

Breakfast (7:30 am)

Greetings and Introduction (9:30-1030)

Session one (10:30-11:45): Pasts of Aeneid Six

  • Emily Gowers (Cambridge University)
    “Why isn’t Homer in Virgil’s Underworld?- and other notable absences.”
  • Massimo Giuseppetti (Roma Tre University)
    “L’eroe e l’aldilà: Virgilio di fronte ai suoi modelli greci.”
  • Jelena Pilipovic (Belgrade University)
    Lumen purpureum: A comparative interpretation of Vergil’s description of Elysium in the Aeneid 6 and Plato’s description of earth below the heaven in the Phaedo.”
  • Fabio Stok (Università Di Roma Tor Vergata)
    “Peccatori e punizioni dell’ Oltretomba virgiliano nell’ esegesi tardoantica.”

Coffee Break (11:45-12:00)

Session Two (12:00-1:40): Performance and Afterlife in Vergil’s Underworld

  • Micah Myers (North Carolina State University)
    “Vergil’s Underworld and the Afterlife of Love Poets.”
  • Francisco Edi Sousa (Universidade Federal do Ceará)
    “Cynthie aux enfers de Virgile: réception de l’Énéide VI dan l’élégie 4.7 Properce.”
  • Lauren Curtis (Harvard University)
    “Paradise and Performance in Virgil’s Underworld and Horace’s Carmen Saeculare.
  • Ioannis Ziogas (The Australian National University)
    “Singing for Octavia: Vergil’s Life and Marcellus’ Death.

Lunch (1:45-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:15): Romanizing the Underworld

  • Alessandro Schiesaro (Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza")
    “Virgil’s Lucretian Underworld”
  • Sarah Spence (University of Georgia)
    paci imponere morem and the role of discernment in Aeneid 6.”
  • Alison Keith (University of Toronto)
    Vergilian Underworlds in Ovid

Coffee Break (4:15)

Session Four (4:30-6:00): Aeneid Six in Imperial Poetry

  • John Schafer (Northwestern University)
    “Seneca’s Book 6.”
  • Emily Pillinger (King’s College London)
    Statius and the Sibylline (Information) Superhighway.
  • Damien Nelis (Université de Genève)
    "Sailing to Hades: Aeneid 6 in the Argonautica of Valerius Flaccus."

C.I.E.E Naples Meeting (6:30)
Serena Fusco (Resident Director, CIEE Study Center) and interested colleagues.

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 26

Breakfast (7:30)

Session 1 (9:00-10:15): Aeneid Six in Late Antiquity

  • Moa Elisabeth Ekbom (Uppsala University)
    “The reception of Aeneid VI in the Historia Augusta: Prophecy, poignancy, and puns.”
  • Gaetano Bevelacqua, (King’s College London)
    “The Use and Reception of Aeneid Six in Late Antique and Early Medieval Epigraphy.
  • Gabriela Ryser (University of Göttingen)
    Impia Tartara: Receptions of Aeneid VI in Late Antique Epic Poems.”

Session 2 (10:15-11:30): Christian Peregrinations in Vergil's Hell

  • Tom Zanker (Harvard University)
    Aeneid VI and the Divinae Institutiones of Lactantius.
  • Jacob Mackey (Queens College CUNY)
    "The Silence of Aeneid 6 in Augustine's Confessions."
  • Andrea Doyle (University of Johannesburg)
    “The Sibyl of Cumae: A journey in text and image from Virgil to Michelangelo and beyond.”

Coffee break (11:30-11:40)

Session 3 (11:40-1:15): Aeneid Six and its Commentators

  • Anna Jourbina (Gorky Institute of World Literature of Russian Academy of Science)
    “Fulgentius and his Exposition of the Content of Vergil: Gathering Knowledge in the Underworld.”
  • Adrian Mihai (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
    “L’ au-delà du livre VI de l’ Énéide de Virgile dans le miroir du Néoplatonisme latin.
  • Séverine Clément-Tarantino (Lille 3 Charles de Gaulle)
    “La lecture du chant VI de l’ Énéide selon Tiberius Claudius Donat: une reception singulière-une lecture sans reception?”
  • Luigi Galasso (Università di Pavia)
    “Some Aspects of the commentary by Norden on Book VI of the Aeneid.”

Lunch (1:15-2:15)

Session 4 (2:15-3:30): Aeneid Six and Memorialization of the Dead

  • Nandini Pandey (Loyola University Maryland)
    “Some Architectural ‘Ghosts’ and Their Reader Reception in Aeneid 6.”
  • Ourania Molyviati (Thessaloniki Greece)
    “Reconfiguring Aeneid VI: Elysium and the Campus Martius of Rome.
  • Linda Robertson (Hobart and William Smith Colleges)
    “To pull history through to the present: The Aeneid and Artistic Design of the National September 11 memorial and museum.

Coffee Break (3:30-3:45)

Session 5 (3:45-5:30):  Tracking Aeneid Six from the Renaissance to Modernity

  • Matteo Soranzo (McGill University)
    “Exploring the Forests of Antiquity: The Golden Bough in Renaissance Literature.”
  • Valentina Prosperi (Università degli Studi di Sassari)
    “Virgilian Katabasis and Trojan Genealogy in Early Modern Italian Poetry.”
  • Ippokratis Kantzios (University of South Florida)
    “Fénelon’s Subversive Uses of Aeneid VI.”
  • Hallie Marshall (University of British Columbia)
    “’My Mind moves upon silence and Aeneid VI’: the silent void in Classical Reception.”

Keynote Address (6:00-6:45)

  • Alessandro Barchiesi (University of Siena at Arezzo/Stanford University)
    “Into the Woods”

Cocktails (7:00)

Dinner (7:30)

June 27

Breakfast (7:00)

Travel to Naples (8:00-9:00)

Session 1 (9:45-11:30) Virgilio e la Campania nella ricerca dipartimentale
Chair e introduce Dir. Arturo De Vivo

  • Valeria Viparelli
    “Tracciabilità del patrimonio culturale della Campania.”
  • Marisa Squillante
    “BibCLat Biblioteca digitalizzata Commentari Latini.”
  • Giancarlo Abbamonte
    “Letture lessicografiche di Virgilio e dei suoi commentatori nel XV secolo.”
  • Concetta Longobardi (Postgraduate)
    “I commentatori virgiliani e la localizzazione cumana di Dedalo”

Coffee Break (11:30-11:45)

Session 2 (11:45-1:30): Aeneid Six, Inspiration and the Soul

  • Renaud Gangé (Cambridge University)
    “The Sibyl and Oracular Poetry.”
  • Bill Gladhill (McGill University)
    “Situating the Soul in Vergil’s Aeneid.”
  • Grant Parker (Stanford University)
    “Spiritualist Philology.”
  • Miguel Herrero de Jáuregui (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
    “Ritual Readings of Aeneid VI: Mystics and Skeptics.”

Lunch Break (1:30-2:30)

Session Three (2:30-4:00): Literary Reincarnations

  • Joseph Farrell (University of Pennsylvania)
    “Reading the Vergilian Underworld through Dante and Homer”
  • Maggie Kilgour (McGill University)
    “The Afterlife’s Afterlife”
  • Philip Hardie (Cambridge University)
    “Some Early Modern Afterlives of the Virgilian Underworld”

Tour of the Underground City (5:00-6:30)

Return trip to Villa (6:30)

Dinner (7:30)

 

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ROMAN DAILY LIFE IN PETRONIUS AND POMPEII

An NEH Summer Seminar for Pre-Collegiate Teachers (July 13-31, 2020) 

In the summer of 2020 (July 13-31), there will be an NEH Summer Seminar for pre-collegiate teachers (K-12) on the topic of Roman Daily Life. This seminar is an opportunity to read Petronius and graffiti in Latin and look at Pompeian archaeology for various topics of Roman daily life. The Petronius reading forms a central core of the seminar, and thus an intermediate level of Latin proficiency (1 year of college level Latin) is required. The seminar will be held in St. Peter, Minnesota (1 hour from Minneapolis) on the campus of Gustavus Adolphus College. The NEH pays each person $2700 to participate, which will more than cover the living and food expenses (approximately $1500) – each participant is responsible for their own travel expenses. The seminar has been organized by Matthew Panciera (Gustavus Adolphus) and will be co-taught by him, Beth Severy-Hoven (Macalester), Jeremy Hartnett (Wabash), and Rebecca Benefiel (Washington and Lee).

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/23/2020 - 9:57am by Erik Shell.

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) invites applications for the 2020 round of the Public Scholars program, which supports the creation of well-researched nonfiction books in the humanities written for the broad public. The program welcomes projects in all areas of the humanities, regardless of geographic or chronological focus. The resulting books might present a narrative history, tell the stories of important individuals, analyze significant texts, provide a synthesis of ideas, revive interest in a neglected subject, or examine the latest thinking on a topic. Books supported by this program must be written in a readily accessible style, must clearly explain specialized terms and concepts, and must frame their topics to have wide appeal. They should also be carefully researched and authoritative, making appropriate use of primary and/or secondary sources and showing appropriate familiarity with relevant existing publications or scholarship. Applications to write books directed primarily to professional scholars are not suitable.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 01/21/2020 - 9:01am by Erik Shell.
NEH Logo

January, 2020

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Nathanael Stein (Florida State University) - "Causation and Explanation in Aristotle"
  • Marcus Folch (Columbia University) - "A Cultural History of Incarceration and the Prison in Greece and Rome"
  • Alexander Jones (New York University) - "Reconstructing the Daily Ancient Babylonian Chronology in Synchronization with the Proleptic Julian Calendar"

---

(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 01/17/2020 - 10:45am by Erik Shell.

(The website for Keely Lake's In Memoriam can be found here)

Keely K. Lake, 48, passed away on January 15, 2020, at the age of 48.  

She was the daughter of James and Dorothy (Burcham) Lake, born on December 8, 1971.  She had recently moved back to Hot Springs to care for her father.

Keely graduated from Hot Springs High school in 1990, the University of South Dakota with a BA in Classics in 1994 and the University of Iowa with a PhD in Classics in 2001.

She was a visiting guest professor at Gettysburg College in 2001 and Professor of Classical Greek and Latin at Wayland Academy from 2002 until 2018.

She was teaching online courses for Montclair State, Wayne State University and One Schoolhouse.

She was an active member of the Vergilian Society, several Classic related boards and organizations and was a reader/table leader for standardized AP exams in Latin.

Keely was an avid gardener, enjoyed cooking, reading, traveling, and collecting books.  She also traveled extensively which was a passion of hers. 

She is survived by her father, James Lake; and her precious cats, Penelope and Gemini.  She is preceded in death by her mother.

Visitation services will be held 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m., Thursday, January 23, 2020, at Chamberlain McColley’s Funeral Home in Hot Springs, SD.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Fri, 01/17/2020 - 9:53am by Erik Shell.

CFP: "Transitions of Power" for SAGE Business Cases

The Ancient Leadership collection within SAGE Business Cases explores leadership in Classical history, mythology, philosophy, and material culture in a way that is engaging and useful for business students and instructors at the undergraduate and graduate level. This project is a chance for those of us who work in the ancient world to experiment with a very mainstream method of leadership pedagogy and hopefully to teach a wider audience about the central importance of the humanities for leadership study and training. We expect that each of the case studies will illustrate the ways in which the humanities makes important–if not unique–contributions to the study of leadership and the training of leaders:

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/16/2020 - 10:19am by Erik Shell.

The Theory and Practice of Cosmic Ascent: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Approaches

Trinity College, Dublin
19-20 June, 2020

Conference Sponsors: Trinity College Department of Classics, and The Centre for the Study of the Platonic Tradition, Trinity College, Dublin

Conference Organisers: Professor John Dillon (Emeritus, Trinity College, Dublin) and Nicholas Banner (Trinity College, Dublin) 

Date:  19-20 June, 2020
Submission Deadline:  13 March, 2020
Confirmation Date:  01 April, 2020

One of the most striking tropes in the history of western thought is the account of cosmic ascent; we find narratives of humans ascending to the stars and beyond in a vast array of sources from among the earliest written accounts of western literature, through antiquity, and up to (at least) the High Middle Ages. From the Hellenistic period onward, Mediterranean religions and philosophies (understood broadly) looked increasingly to a model of human ascent as a primary locus for spiritual achievement; however, the ways in which such ascent was conceptualized vary enormously from tradition to tradition (we might compare e.g. Jewish apocalyptic texts with the ascent-accounts of Platonist philosophers, or Hermetic with Sethian ascent-accounts), and even from thinker to thinker (we might contrast e.g. Plutarch with Plotinus or St Paul with Clement of Alexandria). 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 01/14/2020 - 9:31am by Erik Shell.

Call for Papers
Sapiens Ubique Civis VIII – Szeged 2020
PhD Student and Young Scholar Conference on Classics and the Reception of Antiquity
Szeged, Hungary, September 2–4, 2020

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis VIII – Szeged 2020, for PhD Students, Young Scholars, as well as M.A. students aspiring to apply to a PhD program.

The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in a variety of periods, places, languages, and fields. Papers on a wide range of subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome.

Lectures: The language of the conference is English. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by discussion. It is not possible to present via Skype.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 01/14/2020 - 9:26am by Erik Shell.

Our second interview in the Women in Classics series is with Shelley Haley, Edward North Chair of Classics and Professor of Africana Studies at Hamilton College. This is the second of a two-part interview with Prof. Haley, which picks up at the point when she decided to apply to graduate school to study Classics.

CC: How did you decide to apply to graduate school?  

This was a very turbulent time in American history. I was fed up with the United States of America, absolutely fed up. I remember the conversations we used to have about the women’s movement. This was back in the dark ages. There were three or four white women on my floor in college having a deep discussion, wringing their hands and saying, “But how, how, how are we going to have a family and a career? How?” In my head I was just frustrated. My mother, my grandmother, her mother before her, all of them always had to work, and always had family. It can be done. I think that was my first introduction to black feminism, and to the line that divides it from white feminism. I had had enough.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 01/13/2020 - 6:24am by Claire Catenaccio.

Our second interview in the Women in Classics series is with Shelley Haley, Edward North Chair of Classics and Professor of Africana Studies at Hamilton College. She was born in upstate New York and earned her B.A. from Syracuse University in 1972. She received her M.A. in 1975 and her Ph.D. in 1977, both from the University of Michigan. An expert on the figure of Cleopatra, Dr. Haley has discussed the subject on both the BBC and the Learning Channel. Her publications include Fanny Jackson Coppin’s Reminiscences of School Life, and Hints on Teaching (1995) and numerous articles on the role of women in the ancient world and on race in the discipline of Classics.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 4:47pm by Claire Catenaccio.

“Whose Heritage is it Anyway?”: Local Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Age of UNESCO

UT Antiquities Action 2020 Annual Symposium
Keynote speaker: Yvonne Therese Holden, Director of Operations, Whitney Plantation

UT Antiquities Action invites the submission of abstracts for its 5th annual symposium, to be held on Saturday, the 4th of April, 2020 at the University of Texas at Austin. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 01/09/2020 - 9:23am by Erik Shell.

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Many congratulations to Erik Shell who graduates today with his M.A.

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