CONF: Thessaloniki International Conference on Roman Drama

8th Trends in Classics
Thessaloniki International Conference on Roman Drama

May 29-June 1, 2014  

(To be held in Auditorium I,
Aristotle University, Research Dissemination Center
September 3rd Avenue, University Campus  
http://kedea.rc.auth.gr)

Roman Drama and its Contexts

Scholarship, especially in the past, has been reading Roman drama from the perspective of its relation to Greek and Roman prototypes, and its historical context and evolution. Contemporary readings, following recent groundbreaking work based on intertextual, dramatological, performative, psychoanalytical, feminist, gender oriented approaches, philosophical analysis and aesthetics, etc., offer new valuable insights into Roman drama’s poetics and cultural impact.

The conference aims at focusing on the interpretation of Roman comedy, tragedy and the fragments on the basis of such diverse approaches, as mentioned above. By highlighting the various aesthetic, social and historical parameters, the papers are expected to explore ways in which Roman comic and tragic texts fit into their narrower and/or broader textual and cultural contexts.

Organizing Committee

Theodore D. Papanghelis, Aristotle University & Academy of Athens
Richard L. Hunter, University of Cambridge & President of the Governing Board, Aristotle University
Stephen J. Harrison, University of Oxford
Antonios Rengakos, Aristotle University & Academy of Athens
Stavros Frangoulidis, Aristotle University

For further information please see the conference website:  http://www.lit.auth.gr/en/node/2219

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