Conference: 31st International Conference of Philosophy in Vouliagmeni

31st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
VOULIAGMENI (ATHENS RIVIERA)-GREECE:12-15 JULY 2019

on the topic:

"THE POSSIBILITY OF EUDAIMONIA (HAPPINESS AND HUMAN FLOURISING) IN THE WORLD TODAY"

The Conference  will be held at the seaside town of Vouliagmeni (Athens Riviera, Greece), at the Hotel Amarilia (Saint Nicholas Street 13, 16671 VOULIAGMENI, tel.+302108990391, Fax+302108955790, info@amarilia.grwww.amarilia.gr).

The IAGP calls upon philosophers and thinkers throughout the world to participate in the 31st International Conference of Philosophy.

We have selected this topic based primarily on two factors:

Α(1). Greek philosophy from its inception and throughout all phases of its development and transformations had as its guiding light the Socratic question: “How ought one to live one’s life?” (πῶς βιωτέον;). These reflections which occurred under radically different circumstances from the polis to the Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman Imperium, Byzantium and beyond, provide a vast reservoir of wisdom for comprehending both the causes of human unhappiness and the possibilities for human flourishing and its attendant pleasures.

Α(2). The present discussions of happiness, though they preoccupy a central place in the analyses of the human condition in our age of rapid technological advances, globalization, with its promises of material abundance and inexhaustible leisure, have generally reached an impasse. For the most part the popular theories proclaim adaptation to unexamined principles as the key to happiness; others point to neurological findings as a guide for social practices; others declare that practicing dogmas that would make us immune to the hazards of our times is the answer; and of course there are many variations to Huxley’s Brave New World that foresee manufactured happiness in drugs, sex, and living in the now of a crafted forgetfulness; and we cannot ignore the vast data-mining of human attitudes for the purpose of manipulating human actions towards fabricated and ever more transient caricatures of happiness.

We invite thinkers throughout the world to present and share their views and the fruits of their research on the topic of Eudaimonia – the possibilities for happiness, and human flourishing in our times – through the medium of Greek philosophy and its multifaceted heritage.

B. In addition, the following topics, related to the main issue of the Conference, can be investigated and accepted for presentation in the Conference.

  • The concept of virtue, the kinds of virtue, the number of virtues and are virtues necessary for happiness or can they be dispensed with.
  • The good and the common good and whether happiness can be experienced apart from the good or common good.
  • The economic, political and social conditions for happiness.
  • What is the function (ergon) of the human being and what, if any, is its bearing on happiness.
  • The concept and significance of habit in Ancient and modern Philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Wittgenstein, the poets, etc).
  • Epistemological, metaphysical and moral significance of habit.
  • Habit, virtue, paideia and education.
  • The human capacities (dunameis) and the construction and development of personality of individuals (environment, teachers, paideia and education).
  • The relationship of happiness to psychological well-being (Loneliness and depression, psychotropic drugs and well-being.) and objectivity.
  • Friendship and happiness (The relationship between the two obstacles and challenges of creating friendship ties in the present era).

The possibility of Eudaimonia (happiness and human flourishing in non-western cultures” (Africa, China, India, Japan, Korea, etc).

Papers that are scientifically researched which examine the individual elements that constitute the concept of happiness in non-western cultures are most welcome.

D. Any scientific paper relevant to the subject of the Conference and dealing with Greek philosophy can be submitted for consideration.

(For further information please see: www.iagp.gr  www.hri.org/iagp, E-mail: secretariat@iagp.gr)

---

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

"The State College Area School District faces controversial choices about program reductions in next year’s budget. To meet this challenge the district administration recommended phasing out the four-year Latin program at State College Area High School beginning next year. But the vox populi — students, parents, and the community — vigorously defended the importance of Latin to high school education." Read more of Stephen Wheeler's letter here: http://www.centredaily.com/2011/05/05/2691912/proposed-changes-to-latin-miss.html#ixzz1O3aMAaLD.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/01/2011 - 7:05pm by Information Architect.

Princeton Classics major Veronica Shi delivered the traditional Latin oration at commencement ceremonies on May 31. Here is the text and translation of her Carmen Salutationis:

Salutatio

Habita in Comitiis Academicis Princetoniae
In Nova Caesarea prid. Kal. Iun.
Anno Salutis MMXI
Anno Academiae CCLXIV

Carmen Salutationis

quibus modis, quîs principiis, amans
Mater, salutem progeniem tuam?
    favete opus, Musae, novis ne
       nunc titubem pedibus rubescens!
nobis aratrix splendida messium
felixque dux, te, praesidium bonum,
    primam saluto, namque florent
       omnia lumine sub tuo; nec
vos nunc silebo, qui sapientia
tuentur Almam semper et omnibus
    Matrem; professoresque laudo
        filia grata scientiamque
eorum cano, quae discipulos alit
virtute, curis et patientia
    benignius: vobis pietas
        magna, amor altus et eruditus.
et vos, parentes: mane scholasticos
nos creditis, quos canticulo meo
   gaudere nunc vidistis: ecce
        spes modo perficimus decoras.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/01/2011 - 1:15pm by Information Architect.

The Winter 2011 Newsletter is now available for downloading as a pdf. It is also available online.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 05/25/2011 - 5:46pm by .

"Second-grader Joshua Jayne was decked out as a Roman centurion Tuesday, surrounded by classmates in bedsheets, as they visited ancient Rome in their own school cafeteria. Each year, Abington Christian Academy holds a living history day to give students a chance for hands-on learning, said school administrator Jan Wells." Read more: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/students-visit-ancient-rome-without-leaving-clarks-green-classrooms-1.1152101#ixzz1NNOaWZx4

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/25/2011 - 1:56pm by Information Architect.

Princeton's web site has a nice story about Veronica Shi, a classics major, who will deliver the traditional Latin oration at commencement ceremonies on May 31. Read it online here.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 05/24/2011 - 6:02pm by Information Architect.

The Boston Globe published a nice remembrance of Ernst Badian today. Read it online here …

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 05/23/2011 - 11:38am by .

"In the Bulgarian seaside resort town of Sozopol, archaeologists have unearthed an ancient temple of the goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, the private television channel bTV Reported on May 18 2011. The finds were made at Cape Skamnii in the ancient town of Sozopol. Numerous statues and other artifacts have been found, indicating that the site was, indeed, a temple dedicated to Demeter and Persephone." Read more in The Sofia Echo

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:09pm by Information Architect.

"Strolling through outer peristyle of the Getty Villa in Malibu, Calif., is about as close as you can get to time travelling. It’s easy to feel just like a Roman citizen discussing the affairs of the day while meandering through the gardens dotted with bronze statues or sitting at the edge of the 67-metre-long reflecting pool beneath a low-hanging sun. The only thing missing is the toga. While the ancient ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum in southern Italy leave visitors to piece together in their own minds what the daily lives of Romans must have been like, the Getty Villa leaves very little to the imagination." Read more in the Toronto Star.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:05pm by Information Architect.

Mike Lippman, a professor of Classics at the University of Arizona, is featured in an article about marathon readings on Insidehighered.com.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:21pm by .

This Thursday's poem at 3 Quarks Daily is full of puns with a classical theme:

The Agamemnon Rag

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/12/2011 - 1:13pm by Information Architect.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
14th London Ancient Science Conference 2019
Calls for Papers
Res Difficiles: A Conference On Challenges and Pathw
Calls for Papers
The 50th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Pacific Northwest
Awards and Fellowships
As part of its commitment to diversifying the graduate student body and the f

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy