Conference: 31st International Conference of Philosophy in Vouliagmeni

31st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
VOULIAGMENI (ATHENS RIVIERA)-GREECE:12-15 JULY 2019

on the topic:

"THE POSSIBILITY OF EUDAIMONIA (HAPPINESS AND HUMAN FLOURISING) IN THE WORLD TODAY"

The Conference  will be held at the seaside town of Vouliagmeni (Athens Riviera, Greece), at the Hotel Amarilia (Saint Nicholas Street 13, 16671 VOULIAGMENI, tel.+302108990391, Fax+302108955790, info@amarilia.grwww.amarilia.gr).

The IAGP calls upon philosophers and thinkers throughout the world to participate in the 31st International Conference of Philosophy.

We have selected this topic based primarily on two factors:

Α(1). Greek philosophy from its inception and throughout all phases of its development and transformations had as its guiding light the Socratic question: “How ought one to live one’s life?” (πῶς βιωτέον;). These reflections which occurred under radically different circumstances from the polis to the Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman Imperium, Byzantium and beyond, provide a vast reservoir of wisdom for comprehending both the causes of human unhappiness and the possibilities for human flourishing and its attendant pleasures.

Α(2). The present discussions of happiness, though they preoccupy a central place in the analyses of the human condition in our age of rapid technological advances, globalization, with its promises of material abundance and inexhaustible leisure, have generally reached an impasse. For the most part the popular theories proclaim adaptation to unexamined principles as the key to happiness; others point to neurological findings as a guide for social practices; others declare that practicing dogmas that would make us immune to the hazards of our times is the answer; and of course there are many variations to Huxley’s Brave New World that foresee manufactured happiness in drugs, sex, and living in the now of a crafted forgetfulness; and we cannot ignore the vast data-mining of human attitudes for the purpose of manipulating human actions towards fabricated and ever more transient caricatures of happiness.

We invite thinkers throughout the world to present and share their views and the fruits of their research on the topic of Eudaimonia – the possibilities for happiness, and human flourishing in our times – through the medium of Greek philosophy and its multifaceted heritage.

B. In addition, the following topics, related to the main issue of the Conference, can be investigated and accepted for presentation in the Conference.

  • The concept of virtue, the kinds of virtue, the number of virtues and are virtues necessary for happiness or can they be dispensed with.
  • The good and the common good and whether happiness can be experienced apart from the good or common good.
  • The economic, political and social conditions for happiness.
  • What is the function (ergon) of the human being and what, if any, is its bearing on happiness.
  • The concept and significance of habit in Ancient and modern Philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Wittgenstein, the poets, etc).
  • Epistemological, metaphysical and moral significance of habit.
  • Habit, virtue, paideia and education.
  • The human capacities (dunameis) and the construction and development of personality of individuals (environment, teachers, paideia and education).
  • The relationship of happiness to psychological well-being (Loneliness and depression, psychotropic drugs and well-being.) and objectivity.
  • Friendship and happiness (The relationship between the two obstacles and challenges of creating friendship ties in the present era).

The possibility of Eudaimonia (happiness and human flourishing in non-western cultures” (Africa, China, India, Japan, Korea, etc).

Papers that are scientifically researched which examine the individual elements that constitute the concept of happiness in non-western cultures are most welcome.

D. Any scientific paper relevant to the subject of the Conference and dealing with Greek philosophy can be submitted for consideration.

(For further information please see: www.iagp.gr  www.hri.org/iagp, E-mail: secretariat@iagp.gr)

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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