Conference: 31st International Conference of Philosophy in Vouliagmeni

31st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PHILOSOPHY
VOULIAGMENI (ATHENS RIVIERA)-GREECE:12-15 JULY 2019

on the topic:

"THE POSSIBILITY OF EUDAIMONIA (HAPPINESS AND HUMAN FLOURISING) IN THE WORLD TODAY"

The Conference  will be held at the seaside town of Vouliagmeni (Athens Riviera, Greece), at the Hotel Amarilia (Saint Nicholas Street 13, 16671 VOULIAGMENI, tel.+302108990391, Fax+302108955790, info@amarilia.grwww.amarilia.gr).

The IAGP calls upon philosophers and thinkers throughout the world to participate in the 31st International Conference of Philosophy.

We have selected this topic based primarily on two factors:

Α(1). Greek philosophy from its inception and throughout all phases of its development and transformations had as its guiding light the Socratic question: “How ought one to live one’s life?” (πῶς βιωτέον;). These reflections which occurred under radically different circumstances from the polis to the Hellenistic kingdoms, the Roman Imperium, Byzantium and beyond, provide a vast reservoir of wisdom for comprehending both the causes of human unhappiness and the possibilities for human flourishing and its attendant pleasures.

Α(2). The present discussions of happiness, though they preoccupy a central place in the analyses of the human condition in our age of rapid technological advances, globalization, with its promises of material abundance and inexhaustible leisure, have generally reached an impasse. For the most part the popular theories proclaim adaptation to unexamined principles as the key to happiness; others point to neurological findings as a guide for social practices; others declare that practicing dogmas that would make us immune to the hazards of our times is the answer; and of course there are many variations to Huxley’s Brave New World that foresee manufactured happiness in drugs, sex, and living in the now of a crafted forgetfulness; and we cannot ignore the vast data-mining of human attitudes for the purpose of manipulating human actions towards fabricated and ever more transient caricatures of happiness.

We invite thinkers throughout the world to present and share their views and the fruits of their research on the topic of Eudaimonia – the possibilities for happiness, and human flourishing in our times – through the medium of Greek philosophy and its multifaceted heritage.

B. In addition, the following topics, related to the main issue of the Conference, can be investigated and accepted for presentation in the Conference.

  • The concept of virtue, the kinds of virtue, the number of virtues and are virtues necessary for happiness or can they be dispensed with.
  • The good and the common good and whether happiness can be experienced apart from the good or common good.
  • The economic, political and social conditions for happiness.
  • What is the function (ergon) of the human being and what, if any, is its bearing on happiness.
  • The concept and significance of habit in Ancient and modern Philosophy (Plato, Aristotle, Wittgenstein, the poets, etc).
  • Epistemological, metaphysical and moral significance of habit.
  • Habit, virtue, paideia and education.
  • The human capacities (dunameis) and the construction and development of personality of individuals (environment, teachers, paideia and education).
  • The relationship of happiness to psychological well-being (Loneliness and depression, psychotropic drugs and well-being.) and objectivity.
  • Friendship and happiness (The relationship between the two obstacles and challenges of creating friendship ties in the present era).

The possibility of Eudaimonia (happiness and human flourishing in non-western cultures” (Africa, China, India, Japan, Korea, etc).

Papers that are scientifically researched which examine the individual elements that constitute the concept of happiness in non-western cultures are most welcome.

D. Any scientific paper relevant to the subject of the Conference and dealing with Greek philosophy can be submitted for consideration.

(For further information please see: www.iagp.gr  www.hri.org/iagp, E-mail: secretariat@iagp.gr)

---

(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

As the new term approaches and gets underway, the SCS Blog is bringing you fresh perspectives and actionable ideas on teaching the languages, history, and material culture of the ancient Mediterranean.  Try something small — or something big — to kickstart your course!

τίς δ’ οὐχὶ χαίρει νηπίοις ἀθύρμασιν;

Who does not find delight in childish amusements?

Euripides, Auge fr. 272 TrGF

Anyone who has taught an introductory language class is familiar with the age-old challenge of keeping students active and engaged, especially when these courses tend to meet four to five times a week in the morning. This challenge becomes particularly acute for morphology-heavy beginning courses in ancient Greek and Latin, where “drilling” declensions and conjugations has long been a staple. In short: I don’t think I’m saying anything controversial in suggesting that it is easy for drudgery to reign in our beginning language courses.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/26/2019 - 7:06am by Amy Lather.

The new Classics Everywhere initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019, supports projects that seek to engage communities all over the US and Canada with the worlds of Greek and Roman antiquity in new and meaningful ways. As part of this initiative the SCS has been funding a variety of projects ranging from after-school enrichment programs to collaborations with artists in theater and dance. In this post, we focus on four projects that engaged new audiences by allowing them to explore what it was like to do and think as the Greeks and Romans did.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 08/22/2019 - 10:54pm by Mallory Monaco Caterine.
NEH Logo

August, 2019

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

Grantees

  • Gregory Crane (Tufts College) - "Beyond Translation: New Possibilities for Reading in a Digital Age"
  • Matthew Panciera (Gustavus Adolphus College) - "Roman Daily Life in Petronius and Pompeii"
  • Sturt Manning (Cornell University) - "Medieval Monuments and Wooden Cultural Heritage on Cyprus: Building History with Tree-Rings"
  • Elise Friedland (George Washington University) - "Classical Washington: Greece and Rome in the Art and Architecture of D.C."
  • David Konstan (New York University) - "The Legends of Barbara and Katherine in the Greek Tradition (4th - 10th Centuries)"
  • Elizabeth Samet (United States Military Academy) - "The Nine Lives of Alexander the Great"
  • Jose Bermudez (Texas A&M University, College Station) - "Reconsidering the Sources of the Self in the Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern Periods"

---

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 08/22/2019 - 1:15pm by Erik Shell.

Many thanks to Bill Beck for his SCS blog post on funding opportunities for undergraduates, graduate students, teachers and aspiring teachers. In September, look out for more resources on funding, specifically on funding offered by North American institutions to students enrolled in their MA / PhD programs and terminal MA / MAT programs. This forthcoming resource has been a summer project of the SCS office and our summer interns.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 08/19/2019 - 10:20am by Helen Cullyer.

Below is an annotated list of funding opportunities for undergraduate students, graduate students, and current and aspiring teachers of classical philology, ancient history, and classical archaeology. This post is divided into three parts, corresponding to the different target populations, originally discussed separately here, here, and here. The first part is relevant to undergraduate students; the second part concerns funding opportunities for graduate students; the final section is of interest to current and aspiring teachers of classics.

I. Funding Opportunities for Undergraduates

Funding opportunities for undergraduates are organized into two categories: (1) funding for undergraduate study and (2) funding for current undergraduate students who intend to pursue graduate study.

Funding for Undergraduate Study

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 08/19/2019 - 6:01am by Bill Beck.

I bought an old book the other day. 

Used to be, that wouldn’t have been the lede for any writing designed to grab your attention, but as pastimes go, it’s getting a bit less common, so maybe it will do. 

It’s not just that old books have been crowded into a corner of the market for attention by media unimagined only yesterday, but that there are natural cycles that have also been disrupted.  When I was young, we haunted second-hand bookshops and the like because we needed books––good books––ones that had been printed before we were born and long since gone out of print.  Now we’re rich:  everything seems to stay in print forever.  I used to snap up $2 hardcover copies of Henry James novels on the assumption that someday I’d read them.  Now I wonder what I would do with a tired old hardcover when I can count on crisp new paperbacks being deliverable to my door by Amazon in 24 hours any time I want one or e-versions to my iPad in seconds.  In the 1980s, when I wanted a decent copy of Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson of my own to reread, I spent a month searching for one I could purchase––in Philadelphia no less.  My Henry James anxiety only dissipated during the glory years of bookstore superstores. 

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 08/15/2019 - 8:56pm by James J. O'Donnell.

Williams Sanders Scarborough, an 1875 graduate of Oberlin College, was a pioneering African American scholar who wrote a university-level Greek textbook. Kirk Ormand, who now teaches at Oberlin, interviewed Prof. Michele Ronnick, who has recently published a facsimile edition of Scarborough’s Greek textbook, First Lessons in Greek (1881), with Bolchazy-Carducci press. Prof. Ronnick is the world’s leading expert on Scarborough. She found, edited, and published Scarborough’s autobiography in 2005, and has researched Scarborough’s time at Oberlin and as President of Wilberforce University.[1]  

Kirk Ormand: You are publishing a facsimile edition of William Sanders Scarborough’s First Lessons in Greek.Tell us a bit about why Scarborough’s book is important to the history of the profession.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 08/08/2019 - 9:01pm by Michele Valerie Ronnick.

Generic Interplay in and after Vergil

Symposium Cumanum 2020

Villa Vergiliana, Cuma

June 24–26, 2020

Co-directors: Brittney Szempruch (United States Air Force Academy) and John F. Miller (University of Virginia)

Although Vergil famously opens the Aeneid with a definitive statement of poetic intent—arma virumque cano—scholarship has long highlighted the poet’s propensity for the complication of firm generic boundaries. Amid a range of theoretical responses that have shaped the past nearly one hundred years (Kroll 1924; Cairns 1972; Fowler 1982; Conte 1986; Harrison 2007), the Vergilian corpus has emerged as some of the most productive ground for the in-depth study of generic flexibility (e.g. Nelis 2004; Seider 2016).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 08/07/2019 - 10:12am by Erik Shell.

The Fragment (Research Institute)

The 2020/2021 academic year at the Getty Research Institute will be devoted to the fragment. Issues regarding the fragment have been present since the beginning of art history and archaeology. Many objects of study survive in physically fragmented forms, and any object, artwork, or structure may be conceived of as a fragment of a broader cultural context. As such, fragments catalyze the investigative process of scholarship and the fundamental acts of the historian: conservation, reconstruction, and interpretation. The evolution of an object—its material and semiotic changes across time, space, and cultures—can offer insights into the ethics and technologies of restoration, tastes for incompleteness or completeness, politics of collection and display, and production of art historical knowledge.

While the fragment has been described as the central metaphor of modernity and the paradigmatic sign of a contemporary worldview, its history as a trope runs much deeper. Cultures of the fragment have flourished throughout history under such guises as the reuse of architectural parts and the cult of relics, the physical and conceptual image-breakings of iconoclasm, and the aesthetics of repair. Fragmentation can occur through artistic processes, acts of destruction, or forces of nature. It can be willful, accidental, or inevitable, but it is necessarily transformative.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 08/07/2019 - 9:55am by Erik Shell.

The SCS Committee on the Awards for Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level has revised the guidelines for award nomination. One to three awards for excellence in the teaching of Classics will be given to college and university teachers from the United States and Canada. Thanks to a very generous gift to the Society’s Gatekeeper to Gateway Campaign for the Future of Classics from Daniel and Joanna Rose each winner will receive a certificate of award and a cash prize of $500. In addition, each winner’s institution will receive $200 to purchase educational resources selected by the winner. The awards will be presented at the Plenary Session of the Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., in January 2020.

New nomination process for 2019: In order to simplify the nomination process, increase the number of nominations, and encourage the submission of comparable information for each candidate, a new nomination process is being piloted for 2019 (see below). Feedback on changes is welcome and may be sent to the Executive Director.

For more information about the award, you can visit the page here: https://classicalstudies.org/awards-and-fellowships/awards-excellence-teaching-classics-college-level-0

---

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 08/02/2019 - 1:02pm by Erik Shell.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
ANCHORING TECHNOLOGY IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY
Public Statements
On October 13, 2019, the SCS Board of Directors approved the following letter
SCS Announcements
Departmental memberships for 2020 are now available.
Calls for Papers
"Space and Governance: Towards a New Topography of Roman Administration"

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy