Conference: "Contemporary and Cross-Cultural Approaches to Greek Tragedy"

Re-imagining the Greeks: Contemporary and Cross-cultural Approaches to Greek Tragedy

Conference at Amherst College

The Theater and Dance Department at Amherst College will host a three-day international conference, Re-imagining the Greeks: Contemporary and Cross-cultural Approaches to Greek Tragedy, in Holden Theater March 23-25, 2017.

Each day will be devoted to a different region/culture around the world, and its cross-cultural approach to plays from ancient Greece. The first day will be about Japanese adaptations, the second about Black interpretations (African and American), and the third about American adaptations. The conference will combine scholarly discussions, workshops based on non-western performative approaches, and live performances.

“In the past few decades, we have witnessed a worldwide trend of adapting and re-imagining ancient Greek plays,” says Yagil Eliraz, organizer of the conference. “These cross-cultural approaches prove that Greek tragedy is a universal resource, and not the exclusive property and cradle of the West. The conference will offer the opportunity to focus on the performative aspects of these contemporary adaptations, and will bring together scholars and practitioners from various disciplines.”

Conference highlights

March 23, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Japanese adaptations. Discussion: Mae Smethurst from the University of Pittsburgh will lead a discussion about the works of Tadashi Suzuki, Yukio Ninagawa and Miyagi Satoshi. She will be accompanied by director Izumi Ashizawa. Workshop: Experiment with Greek texts using Butoh.

March 23, 9 p.m. Performance: the performer Yokko will present her dance-theater solo piece, “Butoh Medea,” a new adaptation of Medea.

March 24, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Black Interpretations

Discussion and staged reading: Astrid van Weyenberg from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands will lead a discussion about political change as reflected in South African and Nigerian adaptations of Antigone and the myth of House of Atreus. Weyenberg will be joined by scholar and Percussionist Neil Clarke, who will talk about social functions of African drumming. Actors will read scenes from Molora (Yael Farber), Tegonni (Femi Ososfisan), and The Darker Face of The Earth (Rita Dove). Workshop: experiment with Greek texts using live African drumming.

March 24, 9:00 p.m. Screening: Chi-Raq (2015), directed by Spike Lee. adaptation of "Lysistrata", a comedy by Aristophanes, set against the backdrop of gang violence in Chicago.

March 25, 10.30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Book Launch: George Rodosthenous from the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom will launch his new book, Contemporary Adaptations of Greek Tragedy: Auteurship and Directorial Visions.

March 25, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. American interpretations

Discussion: Helene Foley from Columbia University will lead a discussion about the representations of war in American adaptations. Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics Sarah Olsen will discuss dance in ancient Greek tragedies. Workshop: stage director and Visiting Assistant Professor Yagil Eliraz will explore The Persians live music.

March 25, 9 p.m. Screening: La Medea: a musical re-imagining of Euripides’ violent tragedy into a dance-theater performance and feature film á la Latin-disco-pop variety show. Conceived and directed by Yara Travieso.

The conference is funded by the Office of the Dean of the Faculty and the Arts at Amherst Initiative, with additional support from related academic departments. The conference will be part of the Arts at Amherst Spring Festival events.

All conference events are open to the general public, free of charge. Registration is recommended, at www.amherst.edu/go/reimaginingthegreeks . Performers (students and professionals) who wish to take part in the workshops must register in advance, due to limited capacity.

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(Photo: "Empty Boardroom" by Reynermedia, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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(From John Finamore, University of Iowa)

Dear ISNS Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce the call for panels for the 16th annual ISNS conference, to be held in Los Angeles on June 13-16, 2018, in conjunction with Loyola Marymount University.

Anyone interested in organizing a panel at the conference should send a brief description of the panel along with its title and the name(s) and email address(es) of the contact person(s) to the conference organizers:

Panel descriptions are due to us by January 22, 2018.  I will email the list of proposed panels to the ISNS membership before February 5. Panel organizers are responsible for choosing and collecting abstracts for their panels. They should notify the organizers of their decisions by February 26.  Abstracts should be no more than one page, single spaced.

We also welcome individual abstracts for papers that do not fall under any of the announced panels.  Please send those abstracts (again, one-page maximum) to the four conference organizers above.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 10/16/2017 - 9:11am by Erik Shell.

Roman Inscriptions of Britain is a digitally-enhanced version of R.G. Collingwood and R.P. Wright’s Roman Inscriptions of Britain, vol. 1 (1965), and its 2,400 inscriptions. It includes all subsequent Addenda and Corrigenda to volume 1. Volumes 2 (1990–1995, instrumentum domesticum) and 3 (2009, more recent finds) are not yet available online, but all the major Roman inscriptions of Britain are included here. Since the work of editing, preparing, and composing commentary for the inscriptions had already been done, the site’s creator, Scott Vanderbilt, could focus the interface, and on applying TEI and EpiDoc markups. The result is a rich, interactive website: a powerful tool for scholars and students, and a delight to even casual visitors.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/16/2017 - 12:00am by Rebecca R. Benefiel.

Ancient Philosophy Society
18th Annual Independent Meeting

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
April 26-April 29, 2018

Honoring the richness of the American and European philosophical traditions, the Ancient Philosophy Society encourages submissions from a variety of interpretive perspectives. Phenomenological, postmodern, Anglo-American, Straussian, Tübingen School, hermeneutic, psychoanalytic, queer, feminist, and any other interpretations of ancient Greek and Roman philosophical and literary works are welcome.
Please submit papers by e-mail attachment to APS2018@emory.edu. Deadline: November 22, 2017. The author’s name, institution, and references pertaining to the identity of the author must be omitted from the paper, notes, and bibliography. The e-mail accompanying the submission must include the author’s name, the title of the paper, address, telephone, e-mail address, and institutional affiliation.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:24am by Erik Shell.

The Annual Meeting page for our 150th meeting in San Diego, CA is now live. This page will be the hub for all news and developments for our 2019 meeting, which marks our historic Sesquicentennial.

Listed there already are the Calls for Abstracts for the Affiiliated Group Panels, the Organizer-Refereed Panels, and the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance.

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 2:29pm by Erik Shell.

Seventh Annual Tennessee Undergraduate Classics Research Conference--Call for Papers

This conference will pertain to a wide variety of topics concerning the classical world, with paper sessions being divided by theme based on the papers accepted. Abstracts will be considered from any discipline within classical studies (archaeology, history, philology, art, etc.) or a related field, including interdisciplinary topics or topics in Egyptology and the ancient Near East. Examples range from an analysis of the rhetoric of a Demosthenic speech to a report of the findings of a current excavation to a commentary on the hybridization of style in Pompeian wall painting (this is not an exhaustive list).

Submission of Abstracts

Abstracts are due by 5:00pm EST on Monday, November 13, 2017 to clasclub@utk.edu. You must also fill out and submit an information sheet via Google Forms. The Google Form can be found here. Notifications of acceptance will be sent on Friday, December 1, 2017. Click here for a guide for abstract submissions.

Abstract Details

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:24am by Erik Shell.

Thresholds in Literature and the Arts
International Conference

Centre for Classical Studies – Centre for Comparative Studies
School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon (Portugal)
June 2018, 7-8

During the last century the concept of “liminality” has gained increasing attention in many disciplines, from psychology to anthropology, from philosophy to literary and cultural studies. But the state that the word defines is much older than the word itself. Suffice it to think of the myths, heroes and gods related to the katabasis and other forms of passage in ancient Greek and Latin cultures, to get a hint of the historical depth of such a concept.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/11/2017 - 8:56am by Erik Shell.

August 2012: a Latinist, a scholar of Chinese martial arts novels, a classical Persianist, a historian of early Vietnam, a Renaissance literature scholar, an archaeologist of pre-modern Malaya, and a post-colonial literature specialist assembled in New Haven. It was just like a gathering of Marvel’s AvengersTM, but with less spandex. We gathered not to save the world, but to read it: in their Olympian wisdom (to mix mythological universes), President Richard Levin of Yale University and President Tan Chorh Chuan of National University of Singapore had decided to establish Yale-NUS College, a jointly founded small liberal arts college located in Singapore. Their goal was to create a new model for higher education in a globalized future (or something Davos-y like that): our job was to design and eventually teach an interdisciplinary humanities first-year course called “Literature and Humanities,” one half of a yearlong Great Works sequence.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am by Mira Seo.

Cyprus: a Place and Topos in Ancient Literature

Whether it was love, war, struggle or simply a breathtaking landscape that inspired authors in antiquity, Cyprus had it all. Greek and Latin literature abounds with references to the island: the land of kings and heroes and, most importantly, the birthplace of Aphrodite/Venus, Cyprus offers to ancient authors numerous sources of inspiration - Teucer, Evagoras, Pygmalion, Cinyras, Myrrha, Adonis, to name but a few. At the same time, Cyprus the place has a unique cultural identity, shaped under the multiple interrelations, contacts and assimilations of indigenous Cypriot, Greek, and Eastern elements. Similar is the shaping of the linguistic landscape of the island.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 2:38pm by Erik Shell.

Call for Applications to the 2018-2019 Shohet Scholars Grant Program for Research on the Ancient Mediterranean
by International Catacomb Society

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2018-2019. Submission deadline is January 15, 2018.

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 2:25pm by Erik Shell.

Nature and the Divine in Ancient Greek Thought

Discussions of ancient Greek conceptions of nature and the divine have not been as plentiful recently as they once were.  This may be due to disciplinary demarcations.  There is no lack of discussion of either topic, of course, but discussion of the relations between the two concepts, or the lack thereof, is welcome if not needed.  

The interdisciplinary conference, Nature and the Divine in Ancient Greek Thought, will take place March 2-4, 2018 at the University of South Florida Tampa campus.   The conference is sponsored by the University of South Florida Interdisciplinary Center for Hellenic Studies and the University of South Florida Department of Philosophy. There will be three plenary lectures: one by Simon Trépanier of the University of Edinburgh, author of Empedocles: An Interpretation, another by Mor Segev of the University of South Florida, author of Aristotle on Religion, and a third by Wilson Shearin of the University of Miami, author of The Language of Atoms.

If you wish to participate please send an abstract of 1-2 pages by December 17, 2017 to eturner1@usf.edu.  If submissions permit, there will be a session featuring the work of graduate and undergraduate students.  Notification regarding acceptance of abstracts will be made by January 7, 2018.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 10/04/2017 - 10:43am by Erik Shell.

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