Conference: Disease, Community and Communication from Antiquity to Today

Dr Chiara Blanco
Research Lecturer in Classics, 
Trinity College, Oxford

Dear All,

We are delighted to announce our public event on ‘Disease, Community and Communication from Antiquity to Today’, which will take place online on June 19th 2021. 

Stemming from the ‘Body and Medicine in Latin Poetry’ Research Network (2020), 'Disease, Community and Communication from Antiquity to Today' aims to explore how bodily and mental disease may lead to both fracture and reconciliation between the individual and the community, thus navigating issues of isolation and (in)communicability connected with the experience of disease. 

By giving examples, ranging from Antiquity to the present day, of how disease can break social relationships and at the same time offer new forms of communication and empathy, the featured talks will suggest alternative ways of reconstructing a community through (and despite) disease. The event will include experts in Classical Antiquity, such as Prof. David Langslow (University of Manchester), Dr George Alexander Gazis (Durham University), Prof. Peter Meineck (New York University), Prof. Bronwen Wickkiser (Wabash College), as well as academics from other fields working on sociological and psychological aspects of disease, such as Prof. Manuela Barreto (University of Exeter), Prof. Brian Castellani (Durham University), Dr Samantha Allen Wright (William Penn University) and medical practitioners, such as Ms Julia Schneider (Narrative Rx). The event will be divided into two parts: one portion involving UK-based speakers, followed by another portion involving speakers based in the US. 

Bridging the two portions of the event will be a performance of Sophocles’ Philoctetes, which shall further develop the discussion about isolation, disease and communication, and will be performed by students of the Classics Society at Durham. 

'Disease, Community and Communication from Antiquity to Today' is aimed at students and researchers in Classics and other fields, as well as the wider public. In particular, this public event will involve people interested in how the experience of disease in ancient times can help us understand, and therefore deal with, our contemporary experience of disease. 

For further information see our website: https://bodyandmedicinelatin.weebly.com/disease-community-and-communication-2021.html or contact us at: medicineandpoetry@gmail.com.

Link to the programme: https://bodyandmedicinelatin.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/2/3/132353983/disease_community_and_communication_uk-us_programme.pdf

Link to registration:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/disease-community-and-communication-from-antiquity-to-today-tickets-155516238255?aff=ebdsoporgprofile

Organisers:

Chiara Blanco (Trinity College, Oxford)

Michael Goyette (Eckerd College)

Allegra Hahn (Durham University)

Simona Martorana (Durham University)

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Children playing ball games, 2nd century AD. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

“Think of the Children! The Reception of the Ancient World in Children’s Media” was the Women’s Classical Caucus panel at the most recent AIA/SCS meeting. We (Melissa Funke and Victoria Austen, co-organizers) conceived of this panel as a far-reaching conversation about how children have historically engaged with ancient Greece and Rome and how they continue to do so today. In choosing the papers for this panel, we had two primary concerns in mind: to think about how various media use ancient Greek and Roman material for education and play alike, and to use girlhood as a lens to reconsider reception in those media. While more traditional forms of literature, such as storybooks and poetry, were featured as an important aspect of this conversation, the presenters also addressed these issues in primary textbooks, video games, and web comics.

“Nationalism and Imperialism in Futures Past: Classical Reception in Louisa Capper's A Poetical History of England: Written for the Use of Young Ladies Educated at Rothbury-House School (1810),” by Kathryn H. Stutz

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/07/2021 - 8:30am by .

Karl-Christ-Prize for Ancient History

Laureate 2021: Prof. Dr. Klaus Hallof

(Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

The Karl-Christ-Prize, endowed with 25,000 euros and dedicated to the memory of Karl Christ, who held the Chair of Ancient History at the University of Marburg from 1965 to 1988, will be awarded for the fifth time in 2021. The prize is awarded every two years for outstanding academic achievements in the field of ancient history and neighbouring disciplines as well as the history of humanities and classical reception. It is presented alternately at the universities of Frankfurt a.M. and Bern, where Karl Christ's scholarship is being continued.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:49pm by Erik Shell.

2022 Comparative Literature Conference

University of South Carolina

February 10th -13th, 2022

Truth in the Late Foucault

Keynote Speakers

Sandra Boehringer (Université de Strasbourg)

Alex Dressler (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Edward McGushin (Stonehill College)

Special Event: “Foucault: A Polemical Dialogue”

David Greven (University of South Carolina) and Marc Démont (Centre College)

Call for Papers

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:46pm by Erik Shell.
Dr Chiara Blanco
Research Lecturer in Classics, 
Trinity College, Oxford

Dear All,

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:32pm by Erik Shell.

Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”

Dipartimento di Studi letterari, filosofici e di storia dell’arte

EARLY MODERN AND MODERN COMMENTARIES ON VIRGIL 

June 14-16, 2021

An Online Conference 

Link Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81909339883

All times are CEST (Rome time).

For more information: casali@uniroma2.it

Monday, June 14, 2pm-2:20pm

Welcoming words by EMORE PAOLI (Director of the Department of Studi letterari, filosofici e di storia dell’arte, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”) and introduction by SERGIO CASALI

SESSION 1 

Monday, June 14, 2:20pm-5pm 

Chair: VIRGILIO COSTA (Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”)

DAVID WILSON-OKAMURA (East Carolina University)

Afterimages of Lucretius 

FABIO STOK (Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”) 

Commenting on Virgil in the 15th Century: from Barzizza (?) to Parrasio (?)-I 

GIANCARLO ABBAMONTE (Università di Napoli Federico II)

Commenting on Virgil in the 15th Century: from Barzizza (?) to Parrasio (?)-II 

NICOLA LANZARONE (Università di Salerno)

Il commento di Pomponio Leto all’Eneide: sondaggi relativi ad Aen. 1 e 2

5pm-5:20pm 

Break

SESSION 2 

Monday, June 14, 5:20pm-8pm 

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 06/03/2021 - 4:34pm by Erik Shell.
Broken Statue of Ramses II

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative, launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 98 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 10 countries, including Canada, UK, Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina and India.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 06/02/2021 - 8:07pm by .
Penelope and the Suitors, by John William Waterhouse. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Blog: Weaving Humanity Together: How Weaving Reveals Human Unity in Ancient Times

To start with, she lived a respectable life, frugal and hard;
she earned her living by weaving and spinning wool.

primum haec pudice uitam parce ac duriter
agebat, lana ac tela uictum quaeritans.

— Terence the African (P. Terentius Afer), The Girl from Andros, 74–75

This line drew my attention because I am an avid fiber artist. When I am not reading, teaching, and writing about Classics and its connection to Black people, I am in my wool room, lost in the magical world of fiber arts. This line from The Girl from Andros has led me on a new journey of discovering fiber arts in ancient times.

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 06/02/2021 - 1:18pm by .
Ravenna Mosaic. Image courtesy of Elizabeth Herzfeldt-Kamprath.

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought historical epidemics into contemporary public awareness on a massive scale. Although ancient pandemics have been studied in detail since at least the 19th century, over the past year, outbreaks of the past have become apparently more relevant for what they might offer us today. Of course, the interest in historical pandemics seems to increase every time contemporary diseases draw public attention. Over the last three decades, HIV/AIDS, Ebola, and Zika, among others, have made headlines, increasing interest in past diseases, even if not on the same scale as Covid. Presentist concerns, unsurprisingly, drive historical research.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 05/28/2021 - 10:26am by .

This is a reminder that the AIA-SCS Future Meetings Survey is now available.

Please click here to access the survey, which should take no more than 15 minutes to complete.

The survey will remain open until May 31.

The 2022 Annual Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, January 5 – Saturday, January 8 in San Francisco at the Hilton Union Square, with the Parc 55 hotel serving as an overflow property. AIA and SCS signed contracts with these hotels several years prior to COVID-19, and we realize that attendees’ expectations and needs have changed since then owing to concerns about public health, accessibility, and cost. With this in mind, please take some time to fill out our survey on the 2022 meeting and on longer term planning for our conferences. The survey results will assist us in determining the optimal format and structure for our 2022 meeting and beyond.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 05/25/2021 - 1:36pm by Erik Shell.

Dickinson Summer Latin Workshop 2021: Ovid’s Little Aeneid

Dates: July 12-16, 2021

Location: Zoom link to be provided to registered participants

Text: Ovid, Metamorphoses 13.623–14.582

Moderators: Meghan Reedy (D. Phil. Oxford), Christopher Francese (Prof. of Classical Studies, Dickinson College)

Cost: $200

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 05/24/2021 - 5:36pm by Erik Shell.

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