Conference: Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities The Hebrew University of Jerusalem cordially invite you to a Joint Conference on

Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

Sunday-Wednesday June 20-23, 2021

Sunday, June 20, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

17:00-19:00 Opening Session

Greetings

Sergiu Hart, Head of the Humanities Division,Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Organizing Committee

Keynote Lecture

Chair: Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Tel Aviv University

Niall W. Slater, Emory University Textualization from the Bottom Up

Monday, 21 June, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

9:30-11:00 Session I:

Linguistic AspectsChair: Hannah Rosén, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Aaron Koller, Yeshiva UniversityTextualization and Oralization in Early Near Eastern Writing

Ronald Blankenborg, Radboud UniversityDeictic Phonation in Textualization: Pragmatically Preserved Greek Particles

Rodrigo Verano, Complutense University of MadridHow to Make a Literary Text of a Conversation: Evidence from Plato’s Dialogues

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session II:

Material CultureChair: Benjamin Isaac, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University

Raymond F. Person, Jr., Ohio Northern University Textualization across Media: A Case Study Based on Person Reference in Talk and Material Culture

Teddy Fassberg, Tel Aviv University Speaking Objects as Texts

Manuela Giordano, University of Siena Textualizing Democracy and The Eion Herms

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session III:

Homer and Hesiod Chair: David Schaps, Bar-Ilan University

Elizabeth Minchin, Australian National UniversityMoving Towards Textualization: Evidence for Poetic Preparation in Homer

Massimo Giuseppetti, Università degli Studi Roma Tre Textualization as Interpolation? Reconsidering Repetition in Greek Epic Poetry

Ruth Scodel, University of MichiganWorks and Days and the Difficulties of Textualization

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45 Session IV:

Early PoetryChair: Deborah Gera, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Deborah Beck, University of Texas at AustinSappho, Lyric, and Biography: Textualization as a Mode of Thought

Jan Skarbek-Kazanecki, University of ŁodzThe Transmission of the Theognidean Tradition as a Mnemonic Cultural Practice

Andrea Rotstein, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Phoenician Oral Poetry: The Missing Link

Tuesday 22 June, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club Room 405The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

09:30-11:00 Session V:

Greek ProseChair: Jonathan Price, Tel Aviv University

Greetings: Barak Medina, Rector, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Giulia Donelli, University of Bristol Between Orality and Textuality: Epigraphical Letters and Early Greek Literary Prose

Christopher Haddad, Oxford University From Elocution to Epistolography

Uri Yiftach, Tel Aviv UniversityBetween Law and Phantasy: Court Proceedings as a Source on Language, Style and Literature

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session VI:

Textualizing Historical Figures Chair: Donna Shalev, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Il-Kweon Sir, Cambridge University Early Greek Tyrannic Discourse and the Textualization of the Tyrant

Margalit Finkelberg, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University Textualizing Socrates: Plato’s Version

Lisa Cordes, Humboldt UniversityTextualizing Historical Figures in Cicero’s Dialogues – Dynamics and Ambiguities

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club, Room 405 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

9:30-11:00 Session VII:

Textualizing Popular Traditions Chair: Joseph Geiger, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniela Dueck, Bar-Ilan UniversityTextualizing Naïve Geography in Classical Antiquity

Daniel Wendt, Free University Berlin(Con) Textualizing Anecdotes. Written Orality and Natural Narratives in Livy’s Early History of Rome

Sonia Pertsinidis, Australian National UniversityThe Eagle and the Serpent: Textualization and the Fables of Babrius

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 SessionVIII:

BetweenTextandPerformance Chair: Yoav Rinon, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniel Anderson, Coventry University Early Writing Metaphors in Performance

Łukasz Berger, Adam Mickiewicz UniversityOral Design in Plautus’ Verse: The Context of Rehearsal and Performance

Alexander Kirichenko, Humboldt UniversityHow to Do Things with Letters: Orality and Textuality in Ovid’s Metamorphoses

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session IX:

Late AntiquityChair: Gabriel Danzig, Bar-Ilan University

Han Baltussen, The University of AdelaideFact, Fiction or ‘Faction’? Eunapius’ Use of Written and Oral Sources

Chiara Militello, University of CataniaFrom Literacy to Orality and Back: The Complex Textualization of Late Neoplatonic Lectures

Hossein Sheikh, University of GöttingenEstablishment and Composition of the Zoroastrian Legal Corpus after the Muslim Conquests

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45  Session X:

Textualization and Religion Chair: Guy Stroumsa, Academy Member;

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Oxford University

Jordi Redondo, University of Valencia Oral Patterns in the Greek Pentateuch?

Maren Niehoff, The Hebrew University of JerusalemPreserving or Creating Orality in Texts? The Sermons of Origen and Rabbi Abbahu

Evgenia Moiseeva, Salzburg University The Rise of the Written Word in Manichaeism

Concluding Remarks

The conference will take place at The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Albert Einstein Square, 43 Jabotinsky St., Jerusalem, and at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus CampusThe event will be streamed live on the Israel Academy website: www.academy.ac.il and on Zoom by pre-registration

links to zoom and to registration for physical attendence

https://academy.ac.il/Index/Entry.aspx?nodeId=936&entryId=22423

link to conference site https://oralityliteracyxiv.wordpress.com

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Since issues pertaining to social media continue to arise, the Society for Classical Studies wishes as a supplement to its earlier statement to caution its members and the members of its various affiliated organizations that they should take great care before making allegations on matters of fact about members of the scholarly community or repeating such assertions in their own media posts. Strong criticism is protected by academic freedom, but falsehood is not. Repeating false information or false rumors, or encouraging false inferences about another person, or about scientific or other factual matters, could hurt the public image and long-term health of our Society and our discipline, and could cause harm—both reputational harm and legal liability—to the original poster and to others. The SCS Statement of Professional Ethics prohibits harassment and intimidation, which can take place on social media, and the Committee on Professional Ethics may review complaints about such harassment.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Tue, 12/21/2021 - 9:13am by Helen Cullyer.
A white woman wearing rectangular glasses, a black mask, and a purple t-shirt holds a white flag. Behind her, a person in a black jacket with a fur-trimmed hood holds a sign. They are outdoors on the sidewalk, and the sky is cloudy.

Our sixth interview in the Contingent Faculty Series is a virtual conversation between Dr. Joshua Nudell and Dr. Aven McMaster.

Joshua Nudell: There is no easy way into this conversation, but, until recently, you were tenured at a university that went through bankruptcy and now you are a contingent faculty member. Without dwelling on the events at Laurentian, how has this transition informed your view of contingency in particular and academia in general?

Aven McMaster: Don’t worry, I’m used to talking about all this! In fact, it’s a reminder of how entwined we tend to be with our jobs.

Before all this happened, I’d already been grappling with the problems of contingency, since my partner has been a sessional lecturer (Canadian term for “adjunct”) for years now. But obviously it has made this issue even more personal. Losing the only job I’ve trained for, after 15 years of full-time employment, certainly has made me doubt a lot of what I thought was stable or certain in this world.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/20/2021 - 9:21am by .

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens is pleased to announce its summer seminars for 2022:

Thanatopsis: Greek Funerary Customs Through the Ages (June 6-24, 2022), led by Professor Daniel B. Levine

and

The Northern Aegean: Macedon and Thrace (June 30 - July 18, 2022), led by Professors Amalia Avramidou and Denise Demetriou

For more details see https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/programs/summerseminars

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 12/20/2021 - 8:37am by Helen Cullyer.
Roman Forum

Travel and see ancient sites in the Mediterranean and Europe in 2022!

The Vergilian Society is offering exciting tours of ancient sites in Sicily, Naples, Malta, Portugal and Romania.   

The Vergilian Society is also offering stimulating Latin workshops for teachers that include opportunities to visit a variety of ancient sites to reinforce their teachings of the ancient world. 

For a description and details of the tours and workshops, visit https://www.vergiliansociety.org/2020-vergilian-society-study-tours-and-workshops/

Over $100,000 in scholarship money available: https://www.vergiliansociety.org/tours/scholarships/

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 12/20/2021 - 8:28am by Helen Cullyer.

Basler Homer-Kommentar [zur Ilias] (BK) /  Homer’s Iliad. The Basel Commentary (BKE)

Project promoter: Swiss National Science Foundation in support of scientific research (SNSF), Berne.

Place of work: University of Basel, Department of Ancient Civilizations, professorial chair for Greek Philology, Petersgraben 51, CH-4051 Basel.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 12/16/2021 - 10:36am by Helen Cullyer.

The Multi-Sensory Experience of Mystery Cults

in the Graeco-Roman Mediterranean:

Making Sense of the Emotions of the Ancient Worshippers

Universität Erfurt, 6-8 May 2022

Call for Papers (Online Conference):

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 12/14/2021 - 3:11pm by Erik Shell.
A beige terracotta vessel shaped like a long tear drop. A dark-skinned figure faces left wearing striped pants and a draped mantle holds an ax and an arrow.

To say that there was such a thing as racism in classical antiquity would strike most modern readers as odd. However, if we examine what racism means, it is not as striking. The modern connotations of “racism” often instantly call up differences in biological features such as skin color. Historians of antiquity, such as Frank Snowden, have examined ancient evidence in search of racial hatred, working from these modern assumptions about what “race” is. Given those assumptions, Snowden concluded that the ancients did not have an idea of racism or hatred of black people more specifically.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/13/2021 - 12:35pm by .

The panel seeks to bring together academics and non-academics to brainstorm ways in which we can effect positive changes to the field of Classics given its negative past, public perception of the field, and the various institutional policies that hamper its effective teaching and study in sub-Saharan Africa. What has been done so far? What critical challenges persist? And what are the ways forward? 

Date: Monday, December 13, 2021

Time: 2pm-4pm GMT

Venue: Zoom (the link will be sent to registered participants).

Organizer: Michael K. Okyere Asante (UESD, Somanya/Stellenbosch University)

Moderator: Dr Nandini Pandey (John Hopkins University)

The panel discussion will be held in two parts: first, we will receive short presentations from speakers, followed by a general discussion of the issues raised in the various speakers' presentations. We intend documenting the discussions and coming up with a report on the issues raised to guide us in forming collaborations which will address these issues for a better future.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 12/08/2021 - 9:38pm by Helen Cullyer.

"'What Has Antiquity Ever Done for Us?'

The Vitality of Ancient Reception Studies, Now."

Online, Wednesday, 15 December to Saturday, 18 December

With #ClassicsTwitter Movie on Sunday, 19 December

View the program at antiquityinmediastudies.wordpress.com/program

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 12/08/2021 - 9:32pm by Helen Cullyer.

The graduate students of the Department of Classics at The Graduate Center at CUNY are happy to share the call for papers for our Spring 2022 14th annual Graduate Conference, entitled ‘Secret Knowledge in the Ancient World: Acquisition and Concealment.’ The conference will be held via Zoom on Friday, May 6, 2022.

We are pleased to announce our keynote speaker, Prof. Radcliffe G. Edmonds III (Bryn Mawr College).

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 12/07/2021 - 3:15pm by Erik Shell.

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