Conference: Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities The Hebrew University of Jerusalem cordially invite you to a Joint Conference on

Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

Sunday-Wednesday June 20-23, 2021

Sunday, June 20, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

17:00-19:00 Opening Session

Greetings

Sergiu Hart, Head of the Humanities Division,Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Organizing Committee

Keynote Lecture

Chair: Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Tel Aviv University

Niall W. Slater, Emory University Textualization from the Bottom Up

Monday, 21 June, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

9:30-11:00 Session I:

Linguistic AspectsChair: Hannah Rosén, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Aaron Koller, Yeshiva UniversityTextualization and Oralization in Early Near Eastern Writing

Ronald Blankenborg, Radboud UniversityDeictic Phonation in Textualization: Pragmatically Preserved Greek Particles

Rodrigo Verano, Complutense University of MadridHow to Make a Literary Text of a Conversation: Evidence from Plato’s Dialogues

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session II:

Material CultureChair: Benjamin Isaac, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University

Raymond F. Person, Jr., Ohio Northern University Textualization across Media: A Case Study Based on Person Reference in Talk and Material Culture

Teddy Fassberg, Tel Aviv University Speaking Objects as Texts

Manuela Giordano, University of Siena Textualizing Democracy and The Eion Herms

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session III:

Homer and Hesiod Chair: David Schaps, Bar-Ilan University

Elizabeth Minchin, Australian National UniversityMoving Towards Textualization: Evidence for Poetic Preparation in Homer

Massimo Giuseppetti, Università degli Studi Roma Tre Textualization as Interpolation? Reconsidering Repetition in Greek Epic Poetry

Ruth Scodel, University of MichiganWorks and Days and the Difficulties of Textualization

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45 Session IV:

Early PoetryChair: Deborah Gera, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Deborah Beck, University of Texas at AustinSappho, Lyric, and Biography: Textualization as a Mode of Thought

Jan Skarbek-Kazanecki, University of ŁodzThe Transmission of the Theognidean Tradition as a Mnemonic Cultural Practice

Andrea Rotstein, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Phoenician Oral Poetry: The Missing Link

Tuesday 22 June, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club Room 405The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

09:30-11:00 Session V:

Greek ProseChair: Jonathan Price, Tel Aviv University

Greetings: Barak Medina, Rector, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Giulia Donelli, University of Bristol Between Orality and Textuality: Epigraphical Letters and Early Greek Literary Prose

Christopher Haddad, Oxford University From Elocution to Epistolography

Uri Yiftach, Tel Aviv UniversityBetween Law and Phantasy: Court Proceedings as a Source on Language, Style and Literature

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session VI:

Textualizing Historical Figures Chair: Donna Shalev, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Il-Kweon Sir, Cambridge University Early Greek Tyrannic Discourse and the Textualization of the Tyrant

Margalit Finkelberg, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University Textualizing Socrates: Plato’s Version

Lisa Cordes, Humboldt UniversityTextualizing Historical Figures in Cicero’s Dialogues – Dynamics and Ambiguities

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club, Room 405 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

9:30-11:00 Session VII:

Textualizing Popular Traditions Chair: Joseph Geiger, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniela Dueck, Bar-Ilan UniversityTextualizing Naïve Geography in Classical Antiquity

Daniel Wendt, Free University Berlin(Con) Textualizing Anecdotes. Written Orality and Natural Narratives in Livy’s Early History of Rome

Sonia Pertsinidis, Australian National UniversityThe Eagle and the Serpent: Textualization and the Fables of Babrius

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 SessionVIII:

BetweenTextandPerformance Chair: Yoav Rinon, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniel Anderson, Coventry University Early Writing Metaphors in Performance

Łukasz Berger, Adam Mickiewicz UniversityOral Design in Plautus’ Verse: The Context of Rehearsal and Performance

Alexander Kirichenko, Humboldt UniversityHow to Do Things with Letters: Orality and Textuality in Ovid’s Metamorphoses

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session IX:

Late AntiquityChair: Gabriel Danzig, Bar-Ilan University

Han Baltussen, The University of AdelaideFact, Fiction or ‘Faction’? Eunapius’ Use of Written and Oral Sources

Chiara Militello, University of CataniaFrom Literacy to Orality and Back: The Complex Textualization of Late Neoplatonic Lectures

Hossein Sheikh, University of GöttingenEstablishment and Composition of the Zoroastrian Legal Corpus after the Muslim Conquests

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45  Session X:

Textualization and Religion Chair: Guy Stroumsa, Academy Member;

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Oxford University

Jordi Redondo, University of Valencia Oral Patterns in the Greek Pentateuch?

Maren Niehoff, The Hebrew University of JerusalemPreserving or Creating Orality in Texts? The Sermons of Origen and Rabbi Abbahu

Evgenia Moiseeva, Salzburg University The Rise of the Written Word in Manichaeism

Concluding Remarks

The conference will take place at The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Albert Einstein Square, 43 Jabotinsky St., Jerusalem, and at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus CampusThe event will be streamed live on the Israel Academy website: www.academy.ac.il and on Zoom by pre-registration

links to zoom and to registration for physical attendence

https://academy.ac.il/Index/Entry.aspx?nodeId=936&entryId=22423

link to conference site https://oralityliteracyxiv.wordpress.com

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"One of the best preserved sculptures from Roman antiquity is about to make its Washington, D.C., debut. Host Scott Simon reports the Capitoline Venus will go on display next Wednesday at the National Gallery of Art." Read or listen to the story at NPR.

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"Listening to Cynthia Shelmerdine describe the writing on a Greek tablet from more than 3,000 years ago, it’s like she was looking over the scribe’s shoulder as he worked. She points out details and nuance of technique, the condition of the tablet and what it means, literally, and for the world of Greek archaeology." Read more …

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 06/03/2011 - 3:58pm by Information Architect.

"An ancient Roman shipwreck nearly 2,000 years old may once have held an aquarium onboard capable of carrying live fish, archaeologists suggest." Read more at CBSNews.com.

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"The State College Area School District faces controversial choices about program reductions in next year’s budget. To meet this challenge the district administration recommended phasing out the four-year Latin program at State College Area High School beginning next year. But the vox populi — students, parents, and the community — vigorously defended the importance of Latin to high school education." Read more of Stephen Wheeler's letter here: http://www.centredaily.com/2011/05/05/2691912/proposed-changes-to-latin-miss.html#ixzz1O3aMAaLD.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/01/2011 - 7:05pm by Information Architect.

Princeton Classics major Veronica Shi delivered the traditional Latin oration at commencement ceremonies on May 31. Here is the text and translation of her Carmen Salutationis:

Salutatio

Habita in Comitiis Academicis Princetoniae
In Nova Caesarea prid. Kal. Iun.
Anno Salutis MMXI
Anno Academiae CCLXIV

Carmen Salutationis

quibus modis, quîs principiis, amans
Mater, salutem progeniem tuam?
    favete opus, Musae, novis ne
       nunc titubem pedibus rubescens!
nobis aratrix splendida messium
felixque dux, te, praesidium bonum,
    primam saluto, namque florent
       omnia lumine sub tuo; nec
vos nunc silebo, qui sapientia
tuentur Almam semper et omnibus
    Matrem; professoresque laudo
        filia grata scientiamque
eorum cano, quae discipulos alit
virtute, curis et patientia
    benignius: vobis pietas
        magna, amor altus et eruditus.
et vos, parentes: mane scholasticos
nos creditis, quos canticulo meo
   gaudere nunc vidistis: ecce
        spes modo perficimus decoras.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/01/2011 - 1:15pm by Information Architect.

The Winter 2011 Newsletter is now available for downloading as a pdf. It is also available online.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 05/25/2011 - 5:46pm by .

"Second-grader Joshua Jayne was decked out as a Roman centurion Tuesday, surrounded by classmates in bedsheets, as they visited ancient Rome in their own school cafeteria. Each year, Abington Christian Academy holds a living history day to give students a chance for hands-on learning, said school administrator Jan Wells." Read more: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/students-visit-ancient-rome-without-leaving-clarks-green-classrooms-1.1152101#ixzz1NNOaWZx4

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/25/2011 - 1:56pm by Information Architect.

Princeton's web site has a nice story about Veronica Shi, a classics major, who will deliver the traditional Latin oration at commencement ceremonies on May 31. Read it online here.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 05/24/2011 - 6:02pm by Information Architect.

The Boston Globe published a nice remembrance of Ernst Badian today. Read it online here …

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 05/23/2011 - 11:38am by .

"In the Bulgarian seaside resort town of Sozopol, archaeologists have unearthed an ancient temple of the goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, the private television channel bTV Reported on May 18 2011. The finds were made at Cape Skamnii in the ancient town of Sozopol. Numerous statues and other artifacts have been found, indicating that the site was, indeed, a temple dedicated to Demeter and Persephone." Read more in The Sofia Echo

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 05/19/2011 - 12:09pm by Information Architect.

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