Conference: Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities The Hebrew University of Jerusalem cordially invite you to a Joint Conference on

Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

Sunday-Wednesday June 20-23, 2021

Sunday, June 20, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

17:00-19:00 Opening Session

Greetings

Sergiu Hart, Head of the Humanities Division,Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Organizing Committee

Keynote Lecture

Chair: Rachel Zelnick-Abramovitz, Tel Aviv University

Niall W. Slater, Emory University Textualization from the Bottom Up

Monday, 21 June, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

9:30-11:00 Session I:

Linguistic AspectsChair: Hannah Rosén, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Aaron Koller, Yeshiva UniversityTextualization and Oralization in Early Near Eastern Writing

Ronald Blankenborg, Radboud UniversityDeictic Phonation in Textualization: Pragmatically Preserved Greek Particles

Rodrigo Verano, Complutense University of MadridHow to Make a Literary Text of a Conversation: Evidence from Plato’s Dialogues

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session II:

Material CultureChair: Benjamin Isaac, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University

Raymond F. Person, Jr., Ohio Northern University Textualization across Media: A Case Study Based on Person Reference in Talk and Material Culture

Teddy Fassberg, Tel Aviv University Speaking Objects as Texts

Manuela Giordano, University of Siena Textualizing Democracy and The Eion Herms

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session III:

Homer and Hesiod Chair: David Schaps, Bar-Ilan University

Elizabeth Minchin, Australian National UniversityMoving Towards Textualization: Evidence for Poetic Preparation in Homer

Massimo Giuseppetti, Università degli Studi Roma Tre Textualization as Interpolation? Reconsidering Repetition in Greek Epic Poetry

Ruth Scodel, University of MichiganWorks and Days and the Difficulties of Textualization

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45 Session IV:

Early PoetryChair: Deborah Gera, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Deborah Beck, University of Texas at AustinSappho, Lyric, and Biography: Textualization as a Mode of Thought

Jan Skarbek-Kazanecki, University of ŁodzThe Transmission of the Theognidean Tradition as a Mnemonic Cultural Practice

Andrea Rotstein, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Phoenician Oral Poetry: The Missing Link

Tuesday 22 June, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club Room 405The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

09:30-11:00 Session V:

Greek ProseChair: Jonathan Price, Tel Aviv University

Greetings: Barak Medina, Rector, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Giulia Donelli, University of Bristol Between Orality and Textuality: Epigraphical Letters and Early Greek Literary Prose

Christopher Haddad, Oxford University From Elocution to Epistolography

Uri Yiftach, Tel Aviv UniversityBetween Law and Phantasy: Court Proceedings as a Source on Language, Style and Literature

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Session VI:

Textualizing Historical Figures Chair: Donna Shalev, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Il-Kweon Sir, Cambridge University Early Greek Tyrannic Discourse and the Textualization of the Tyrant

Margalit Finkelberg, Academy Member; Tel Aviv University Textualizing Socrates: Plato’s Version

Lisa Cordes, Humboldt UniversityTextualizing Historical Figures in Cicero’s Dialogues – Dynamics and Ambiguities

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Maiersdorf Faculty Club, Room 405 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus Campus

9:30-11:00 Session VII:

Textualizing Popular Traditions Chair: Joseph Geiger, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniela Dueck, Bar-Ilan UniversityTextualizing Naïve Geography in Classical Antiquity

Daniel Wendt, Free University Berlin(Con) Textualizing Anecdotes. Written Orality and Natural Narratives in Livy’s Early History of Rome

Sonia Pertsinidis, Australian National UniversityThe Eagle and the Serpent: Textualization and the Fables of Babrius

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 SessionVIII:

BetweenTextandPerformance Chair: Yoav Rinon, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Daniel Anderson, Coventry University Early Writing Metaphors in Performance

Łukasz Berger, Adam Mickiewicz UniversityOral Design in Plautus’ Verse: The Context of Rehearsal and Performance

Alexander Kirichenko, Humboldt UniversityHow to Do Things with Letters: Orality and Textuality in Ovid’s Metamorphoses

12:45-14:30 Lunch Break

14:30-16:00 Session IX:

Late AntiquityChair: Gabriel Danzig, Bar-Ilan University

Han Baltussen, The University of AdelaideFact, Fiction or ‘Faction’? Eunapius’ Use of Written and Oral Sources

Chiara Militello, University of CataniaFrom Literacy to Orality and Back: The Complex Textualization of Late Neoplatonic Lectures

Hossein Sheikh, University of GöttingenEstablishment and Composition of the Zoroastrian Legal Corpus after the Muslim Conquests

16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:45  Session X:

Textualization and Religion Chair: Guy Stroumsa, Academy Member;

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Oxford University

Jordi Redondo, University of Valencia Oral Patterns in the Greek Pentateuch?

Maren Niehoff, The Hebrew University of JerusalemPreserving or Creating Orality in Texts? The Sermons of Origen and Rabbi Abbahu

Evgenia Moiseeva, Salzburg University The Rise of the Written Word in Manichaeism

Concluding Remarks

The conference will take place at The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Albert Einstein Square, 43 Jabotinsky St., Jerusalem, and at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus CampusThe event will be streamed live on the Israel Academy website: www.academy.ac.il and on Zoom by pre-registration

links to zoom and to registration for physical attendence

https://academy.ac.il/Index/Entry.aspx?nodeId=936&entryId=22423

link to conference site https://oralityliteracyxiv.wordpress.com

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(Sent on behalf of Athanassios Vergados)

We are pleased to announce the programme of our upcoming conference on ‘Reflections on Language in Early Greece’ that will take place on-line via Zoom on 1st-3rd September 2021. To obtain the zoom details, please register at https://newcastleuniversity.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZArdO-uqzwsEtCNY8qTfKAbs9cvCEPsZr17.

Please note that all times are GMT+1 (UK time).

 

 

1st September

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 07/09/2021 - 9:07am by Erik Shell.

AIA and SCS have been working on detailed plans for our 2022 joint Annual Meeting based on the results of our recent survey. Since 60% of respondents expressed a preference for a hybrid meeting, we are planning for our first ever hybrid conference in January 2022. This means speakers will be able to present in person in San Francisco or remotely in each session, and attendees will be able to attend sessions in the hotel or virtually. This is an ambitious undertaking and some elements of the conference cannot easily have a hybrid format; for example, social events will need to be either in person or virtual. However, we aim to make the meeting as hybrid as is feasible given logistics, costs, and staff capacity.  We anticipate a two-tier scale of registration rates, with virtual attendance costing less than in person attendance. There are many details still to be worked out, so please bear with us and we will update you later this Summer and in the Fall.

Members who made submissions to the SCS program committee this spring can expect to receive notification emails about the program committee’s decisions within the next few days.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 07/07/2021 - 6:46am by Helen Cullyer.
The Death of Caesar, Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1867. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Today marks half a year since insurrectionists stormed the U.S. Capitol, occupied the Senate chamber, violently assaulted Capitol Police defending the building, and threatened to assassinate the then-Vice President and other elected officials. In recent days, the House of Representatives has approved a plan for a formal investigation — on partisan lines, after Senate Republicans previously blocked the passage of a bipartisan, 9/11-style commission approved by the House in a bipartisan vote.

We mustn’t forget the assault on the peaceful transition of power, on the foundations of American democracy itself. And we shouldn’t forget that the insurrection is tied up with racist receptions of ancient Greece and Rome. Some insurrectionists came in Greek or Roman-themed cosplay, after all, and the right has long had a dangerous fascination with Sparta.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 07/06/2021 - 9:57am by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad.

Call for Papers 

Fédération internationale des associations d’études classiques (FIEC)

XVI International Conference, 1–5 August 2022
 

Mexico City 

(Virtual Meeting Format) 

Hesperides Sponsored Session 

"Hesperian Transformations: New Approaches to the Classical Tradition" 

Proposal Deadline: July 12, 2021 

  

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Fri, 07/02/2021 - 1:29pm by Erik Shell.
the Delphic oracle as interpreted by Anton van Dale in the 1700 edition of his book De oraculis veterum ethnicorum dissertationes duae

Joseph Fontenrose’s The Delphic Oracle (1978) fundamentally reshaped how we think about Greek oracular divination today. In this book, he argued that the literary evidence for ambiguous verse oracles emanating from Delphi is incommensurate with the epigraphic record. In the Histories, an early and prominent source of oracular lore, Herodotus often quotes vague or ambiguous prophetic verses of the Delphic priestesses that point toward unexpected and ironic moments of fulfillments: the “great empire” that Croesus toppled was, unfortunately, his own (1.86.1). Most inscriptions, however, report oracular pronouncements simply as clear statements of fact: “… it is better [for the Praxiergidai] to put the peplos on [the goddess]…” (Sokolowski, LSCG 15). Fontenrose reasoned that the inscriptions were the more reliable witnesses and concluded from his comparison that most of the famous stories about oracles in works of ancient historiography like Herodotus’ were ahistorical.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/28/2021 - 5:21pm by Daniel J. Crosby.

We are pleased to announce Plato 2022, an interdisciplinary workshop that will investigate the contemporary relevance of Plato’s ethical and political thought. The workshop will be held virtually on June 9-10, 2022. We welcome papers on Plato’s ethical and political thinking and encourage submissions that relate to contemporary events. 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 06/28/2021 - 11:27am by Erik Shell.

Do you teach ancient history, Latin, or any aspect of the ancient world within humanities courses at a community college? Join other community college faculty for the inaugural meeting of a new group convened by the Society for Classical Studies. You can sign up here for the virtual meeting on Thursday July 15, 2021 at 4pm EDT / 3pm CDT / 1pm PDT and also use the form to suggest topics of interest for discussion. Registered attendees will receive the zoom link on July 14th, 24 hours prior to the meeting.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 06/24/2021 - 9:49pm by Helen Cullyer.
Asclepius, his sons, daughters, and Hygeia in the background with a family of worshippers. Votive Relief from the 4th cent. BCE. National Archaeological Museum of Athens.

The Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities initiative (AnWoMoCo), launched by the SCS in 2019 as the Classics Everywhere initiative, supports projects that seek to engage broader publics — individuals, groups, and communities — in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. As part of this initiative, the SCS has funded 111 projects, ranging from school programming to reading groups, prison programs, public talks and conferences, digital projects, and collaborations with artists in theater, opera, music, dance, and the visual arts. The initiative welcomes applications from all over the world. To date, it has funded projects in 25 states and 10 countries, including Canada, U.K., Italy, Greece, Belgium, Ghana, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and India.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 06/24/2021 - 5:17pm by .

Revised 6/17/21 with updated submissions guidelines

As previously announced, Patrice Rankine and Sasha-Mae Eccleston will serve as guest editors of a future issue of TAPA with the theme of race, racism, and Classics (issue 153:1, to appear April 2023). Covid-19 and the global Movement 4 Black Lives have highlighted the extent to which racism is a public health emergency whose reach extends across the Black Atlantic and far beyond. In light of these deeply imbricated developments of 2020, this volume becomes even more timely. A detailed call for papers, along with instructions and deadlines for submission in 2021, follows.

Race and Racism: Beyond the Spectacular

…the “cultural logic” of lynching enables it to emerge and persist throughout the modern era because its violence “fit” within the broader, national cultural developments. This synchronicity captures why I refer to lynching as “spectacular”: the violence made certain cultural developments and tensions visible for Americans to confront.

Jacqueline Goldsby, A Spectacular Secret: Lynching in American Life and Literature

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 06/24/2021 - 8:49am by Helen Cullyer.
Scene from Lil Nas X's music video for MONTERO. A distorted image of a landscape with red trees, large ancient statues, and ancient buildings.

On the eve of March 26th, rapper and internet personality Lil Nas X dropped his newest single, “MONTERO (Call Me By Your Name),” which caused immense controversy in its wake. At its heart is a young, gay Black man’s anthem about self-expression, resembling a “coming-out song.” Lil Nas X himself implied this in a letter to his younger self, posted alongside the song’s release. The title references the 2017 film Call Me By Your Name (based on the 2007 André Aciman novel) about the summer relationship between a Classics professor’s son and doctoral student.

This allusion to the film is not the only sidelong glance that Lil Nas X gives to the Classics. One of the first establishing shots of the video shows the landscape of “MONTERO” littered with classically-inspired architecture:

A distorted image of a bleak landscape filled with ancient statues and ruins

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 06/22/2021 - 8:51am by Vanessa Ruth Stovall.

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