Conference: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Reception Studies: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Online conference

 

24-27 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

25-28 June 2021 (Southern Hemisphere)

Conference Organiser: Anastasia Bakogianni

Hosted by Massey University, New Zealand

In collaboration with The Imagines Project (http://imagines-project.org)

Practicalities: How to sign up for the whole conference or only for the panel(s) and/or workshop(s) you are interested in attending.

https://masseyuni.wufoo.com/forms/m1agvqub0ndacqr/

Registration and attendance are free. All are welcome, but there is a limited number of places.

Day 1: 24 June 2021 (for Northern Hemisphere participants)

25 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Welcome by Professor Kerry Taylor

Head of the School of Humanities, Media and Creative Communication

Massey University, New Zealand

Greetings and brief opening remarks

Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand) and Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:00-8:45am (morning of the 25th June)

Spain and Italy: 9:00-10:45pm (evening of the 24th June)

UK: 8:00-9:45 pm (evening of the 24th June)

US East Coast: 3:00-4:45pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

US West Coast: 12:00-1:45pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

Panel 1: Rethinking Classical Reception Theory and Methodology

Chair: Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph’s University)

  • Suspended Temporalities, Female Otherness, and Classical Reception

Zina Giannopoulou (University of California Irvine: UC Irvine)

  • Rethinking Dialogue Models: The Case of the Phaedrus

Lauren Wilson (The University of Nottingham)

  • Fortuna dell’antico (and Beyond): The State of Reception Studies in Italy

Tiziana Ragno (Università di Foggia)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 25th June)

Spain: 11:00-12:30pm (night of the 24th June)

UK: 10:00-11:30pm (night of the 24th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:30pm (early evening of the 24th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:30pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

Panel 2: Screen Receptions

Chair: Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • Palimsestic Idols: Classical Receptions in Silent Film Stardom

Michael Williams (University of Southampton)

  • Mocking the Hollywood Canon: Parodies of Celluloid Classics from Latin American Cinema’s Studio Era

Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph’s University)

  • Masked Celluloid Classics? In Search of the Tragic Heroine Electra in Film Noir

Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand)

Day 2:
Friday 25 June
(for both Northern and Southern Hemispheres)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:00-8:00pm

The Netherlands: 9:00-10:00am

The UK: 8:00-9:00am

With sincere apologies, this workshop is scheduled during the early hours of the morning for colleagues based in the US.

Workshop 1: New Voices in Classical Reception

Ronald Blankenborg, Nils Lommerde, Jarnick Maarse and Loes Wolters (Radboud University, The Netherlands).

25 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

26 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:45am (morning of the 26th June)

Spain: 9:15-10:45pm (night of the 25th June)

UK: 8:15-9:45pm (night of the 25th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:45pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:45pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

Panel 3: Popular Culture

Chair: Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand)

  • Classics on the Surface: Classical Reception as an Emergent Process

Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • The Merging of Eastern and Western Traditions: Manga and the Power of the Classical Object

Amanda Potter (Open University) and Guendalina Daniela Maria Taietti (University of Liverpool)

  • Escaping ‘Hades’: Playing with Classical Reception
    Hamish Cameron (Victoria University of Wellington)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 26th June)

Italy: 11:00-12:30pm (night of the 25th June)

UK: 10:00-11:30pm (night of the 25th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:30pm (early evening of the 25th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:30pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

Panel 4: Performance Reception

Chair: Martina Treu (Università IULM, Milan)

  • Theatre, Politics, and Money: Karolos Koun’s Art Theatre, the Greek Dictatorship, and the Ford Foundation

Gonda Van Steen (King’s College, London)

  • The “Advent of the New Order”: An Oresteia in Prague (1947) and the Epistemological Limits of Archivalia

Alena Sarkissian (Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague)

  • Persistence of Tragedy: Antigone Today
    Meryem Denyz (Stanford University)

Timings:

New Zealand: 8:00-9:30pm (evening of the 26th June)

Italy: 10:00-11:30am (morning of the 26th June)

UK: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 26th June)

With sincere apologies, this workshop is scheduled during the early hours of the morning for colleagues based in the US.

Workshop 2: Greek Tragedy in a Time of Pandemic with Declan Patrick (University of Waikato), Holly C. Luton (AUT) and Stephe Harrop (University of Hope, Liverpool) in conversation with Anastasia Bakogianni.

The three theatre practitioners, two from New Zealand (Patrick and Luton) and one from the UK (Harrop) discuss their productions of Greek tragedy during the Covid-19 pandemic and the challenges they faced and overcame. Join us for a lively conversation illustrated with images, video and three unique perspectives.

Day 3: 26 June (Northern Hemisphere)

27 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:45am (morning of the 27th June)

Spain and Egypt: 9:15-10:45pm (night of the 26th June)

UK: 8:15-9:45pm (night of the 26th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:45pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:45pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

Panel 5: Modern Societal Challenges and the Classics

Chair: Zina Giannopoulou (University of California Irvine: UC Irvine)

  • The Master’s Tools?: Towards a Politics of Reception

Jesse Weiner (Hamilton College)

  • Ecoclassicisms: Ecocriticism and Classical Reception

Samuel Cooper (American University in Cairo)

  • Classical Reception in Disability Studies: Mary Duffy Imagining Alternative Futures

Amanda Kubic (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor)

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:00am (morning of the 27th June)

Italy: 11:00-12:00pm (night of the 26th June)

UK: 10:00-11:00pm (night of the 26th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:00pm (early evening of the 26th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:00pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

Workshop 3: Playing with Design with Hamish Cameron (Victoria University of Wellington)

If you’ve ever thought about designing a tabletop game about your research area to play in the classroom but don’t know where to start, then this is the workshop for you! Classicist and game designer Hamish Cameron will give a brief introduction to some general design concepts and considerations, then you’ll split into groups to brainstorm how you might start turning your idea into a game. The session will be a combination of Game Design for Academics and social hour. You probably won’t design a complete game, but you might get some cool ideas that lead to a complete game later. You’ll also get to chat with other folk interested in designing games for the classroom.

Day 4: 27 June (Northern Hemisphere)

28 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:15am (morning of the 28th June)

Spain: 9:15-10:15pm (night of the 27th June)

UK: 8:15-9:15pm (night of the 27th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:15pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:15pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

Panel 6: Education in Academia and Beyond

Chair:  Gonda Van Steen (King’s College, London)

  • Social Justice-Engaged Reception Pedagogy: "Classics Beyond Whiteness" at Wake Forest

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University) and Caitlin Hines (University of Cincinnati)

  • Talking about Silence: How and Why to teach Classical Rape Stories

Caroline Bristow (University of Cambridge), Susan Deacy and Aimee Hinds (University of Roehampton)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 8:30-9:30am (morning of the 28th June)

Spain: 10:30-11:30pm (night of the 27th June)

UK: 9:30-10:30pm (night of the 27th June)

US East Coast: 4:30-5:30pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

US West Coast: 1:30-2:30pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

Panel 7: Digital Pedagogy and Public Engagement

Chair: Jesse Weiner (Hamilton College)

  • Classical Reception Meets Pedagogy: The Creation and Uses of the Panoply Vase Animation Project's Our Mythical Childhood Animations

Sonya Nevin (University of Roehampton/Panoply Vase Animation Project)

  • Classical Reception Beyond the Classroom: Engaging Public Audiences with Remaking Ancient Myths

Emma Bridges (The Open University)

Brief concluding remarks

Anastasia Bakogianni

The End!

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