Conference: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Reception Studies: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Online conference

 

24-27 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

25-28 June 2021 (Southern Hemisphere)

Conference Organiser: Anastasia Bakogianni

Hosted by Massey University, New Zealand

In collaboration with The Imagines Project (http://imagines-project.org)

Practicalities: How to sign up for the whole conference or only for the panel(s) and/or workshop(s) you are interested in attending.

https://masseyuni.wufoo.com/forms/m1agvqub0ndacqr/

Registration and attendance are free. All are welcome, but there is a limited number of places.

Day 1: 24 June 2021 (for Northern Hemisphere participants)

25 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Welcome by Professor Kerry Taylor

Head of the School of Humanities, Media and Creative Communication

Massey University, New Zealand

Greetings and brief opening remarks

Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand) and Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:00-8:45am (morning of the 25th June)

Spain and Italy: 9:00-10:45pm (evening of the 24th June)

UK: 8:00-9:45 pm (evening of the 24th June)

US East Coast: 3:00-4:45pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

US West Coast: 12:00-1:45pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

Panel 1: Rethinking Classical Reception Theory and Methodology

Chair: Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph’s University)

  • Suspended Temporalities, Female Otherness, and Classical Reception

Zina Giannopoulou (University of California Irvine: UC Irvine)

  • Rethinking Dialogue Models: The Case of the Phaedrus

Lauren Wilson (The University of Nottingham)

  • Fortuna dell’antico (and Beyond): The State of Reception Studies in Italy

Tiziana Ragno (Università di Foggia)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 25th June)

Spain: 11:00-12:30pm (night of the 24th June)

UK: 10:00-11:30pm (night of the 24th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:30pm (early evening of the 24th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:30pm (afternoon of the 24th June)

Panel 2: Screen Receptions

Chair: Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • Palimsestic Idols: Classical Receptions in Silent Film Stardom

Michael Williams (University of Southampton)

  • Mocking the Hollywood Canon: Parodies of Celluloid Classics from Latin American Cinema’s Studio Era

Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph’s University)

  • Masked Celluloid Classics? In Search of the Tragic Heroine Electra in Film Noir

Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand)

Day 2:
Friday 25 June
(for both Northern and Southern Hemispheres)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:00-8:00pm

The Netherlands: 9:00-10:00am

The UK: 8:00-9:00am

With sincere apologies, this workshop is scheduled during the early hours of the morning for colleagues based in the US.

Workshop 1: New Voices in Classical Reception

Ronald Blankenborg, Nils Lommerde, Jarnick Maarse and Loes Wolters (Radboud University, The Netherlands).

25 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

26 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:45am (morning of the 26th June)

Spain: 9:15-10:45pm (night of the 25th June)

UK: 8:15-9:45pm (night of the 25th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:45pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:45pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

Panel 3: Popular Culture

Chair: Anastasia Bakogianni (Massey University, New Zealand)

  • Classics on the Surface: Classical Reception as an Emergent Process

Luis Unceta Gómez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • The Merging of Eastern and Western Traditions: Manga and the Power of the Classical Object

Amanda Potter (Open University) and Guendalina Daniela Maria Taietti (University of Liverpool)

  • Escaping ‘Hades’: Playing with Classical Reception
    Hamish Cameron (Victoria University of Wellington)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 26th June)

Italy: 11:00-12:30pm (night of the 25th June)

UK: 10:00-11:30pm (night of the 25th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:30pm (early evening of the 25th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:30pm (afternoon of the 25th June)

Panel 4: Performance Reception

Chair: Martina Treu (Università IULM, Milan)

  • Theatre, Politics, and Money: Karolos Koun’s Art Theatre, the Greek Dictatorship, and the Ford Foundation

Gonda Van Steen (King’s College, London)

  • The “Advent of the New Order”: An Oresteia in Prague (1947) and the Epistemological Limits of Archivalia

Alena Sarkissian (Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague)

  • Persistence of Tragedy: Antigone Today
    Meryem Denyz (Stanford University)

Timings:

New Zealand: 8:00-9:30pm (evening of the 26th June)

Italy: 10:00-11:30am (morning of the 26th June)

UK: 9:00-10:30am (morning of the 26th June)

With sincere apologies, this workshop is scheduled during the early hours of the morning for colleagues based in the US.

Workshop 2: Greek Tragedy in a Time of Pandemic with Declan Patrick (University of Waikato), Holly C. Luton (AUT) and Stephe Harrop (University of Hope, Liverpool) in conversation with Anastasia Bakogianni.

The three theatre practitioners, two from New Zealand (Patrick and Luton) and one from the UK (Harrop) discuss their productions of Greek tragedy during the Covid-19 pandemic and the challenges they faced and overcame. Join us for a lively conversation illustrated with images, video and three unique perspectives.

Day 3: 26 June (Northern Hemisphere)

27 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:45am (morning of the 27th June)

Spain and Egypt: 9:15-10:45pm (night of the 26th June)

UK: 8:15-9:45pm (night of the 26th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:45pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:45pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

Panel 5: Modern Societal Challenges and the Classics

Chair: Zina Giannopoulou (University of California Irvine: UC Irvine)

  • The Master’s Tools?: Towards a Politics of Reception

Jesse Weiner (Hamilton College)

  • Ecoclassicisms: Ecocriticism and Classical Reception

Samuel Cooper (American University in Cairo)

  • Classical Reception in Disability Studies: Mary Duffy Imagining Alternative Futures

Amanda Kubic (University of Michigan-Ann Arbor)

Timings:

New Zealand: 9:00-10:00am (morning of the 27th June)

Italy: 11:00-12:00pm (night of the 26th June)

UK: 10:00-11:00pm (night of the 26th June)

US East Coast: 5:00-6:00pm (early evening of the 26th June)

US West Coast: 2:00-3:00pm (afternoon of the 26th June)

Workshop 3: Playing with Design with Hamish Cameron (Victoria University of Wellington)

If you’ve ever thought about designing a tabletop game about your research area to play in the classroom but don’t know where to start, then this is the workshop for you! Classicist and game designer Hamish Cameron will give a brief introduction to some general design concepts and considerations, then you’ll split into groups to brainstorm how you might start turning your idea into a game. The session will be a combination of Game Design for Academics and social hour. You probably won’t design a complete game, but you might get some cool ideas that lead to a complete game later. You’ll also get to chat with other folk interested in designing games for the classroom.

Day 4: 27 June (Northern Hemisphere)

28 June (Southern Hemisphere)

Timings:

New Zealand: 7:15-8:15am (morning of the 28th June)

Spain: 9:15-10:15pm (night of the 27th June)

UK: 8:15-9:15pm (night of the 27th June)

US East Coast: 3:15-4:15pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

US West Coast: 12:15-1:15pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

Panel 6: Education in Academia and Beyond

Chair:  Gonda Van Steen (King’s College, London)

  • Social Justice-Engaged Reception Pedagogy: "Classics Beyond Whiteness" at Wake Forest

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad (Wake Forest University) and Caitlin Hines (University of Cincinnati)

  • Talking about Silence: How and Why to teach Classical Rape Stories

Caroline Bristow (University of Cambridge), Susan Deacy and Aimee Hinds (University of Roehampton)

Break

Timings:

New Zealand: 8:30-9:30am (morning of the 28th June)

Spain: 10:30-11:30pm (night of the 27th June)

UK: 9:30-10:30pm (night of the 27th June)

US East Coast: 4:30-5:30pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

US West Coast: 1:30-2:30pm (afternoon of the 27th June)

Panel 7: Digital Pedagogy and Public Engagement

Chair: Jesse Weiner (Hamilton College)

  • Classical Reception Meets Pedagogy: The Creation and Uses of the Panoply Vase Animation Project's Our Mythical Childhood Animations

Sonya Nevin (University of Roehampton/Panoply Vase Animation Project)

  • Classical Reception Beyond the Classroom: Engaging Public Audiences with Remaking Ancient Myths

Emma Bridges (The Open University)

Brief concluding remarks

Anastasia Bakogianni

The End!

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities The Hebrew University of Jerusalem cordially invite you to a Joint Conference on

Orality and Literacy XIV: Textualization

Sunday-Wednesday June 20-23, 2021

Sunday, June 20, 2021

Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 1:45pm by Erik Shell.

(Originally posted on haverford.edu)

Aryeh Kosman, Haverford's John Whitehead Professor of Philosophy Emeritus, died early [June 17] of complications following a fall. He was 85.

After receiving his undergraduate and M.A. degrees at the University of California, Berkeley, he briefly studied at Hebrew University before earning his Ph.D. from Harvard University. He joined the Haverford faculty as an assistant professor in 1962, was promoted to full professor in 1973, became the Whitehead Professor in 1987, and retired in 2010.

"Aryeh was a star in Greek Philosophy," says Joel Yurdin, Haverford associate professor of philosophy. "Many of his articles are required reading for anyone writing on the topic, and they covered virtually every area of the field, including metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of science." Such scholarship led to visiting professorships at Princeton, UCLA, and Berkeley and, in 1985, an award for distinguished teaching from the Lindback Foundation. That honor affirmed what, by then, thousands of Fords already knew: Prof. Kosman was thoroughly devoted to his Haverford students.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Mon, 06/21/2021 - 10:20am by Erik Shell.

Call for Fellows: Data Visualizations Using the D’Argenio Collection

Seton Hall University – University Libraries (Fall 2021)
Application Deadline: July 15, 2021
Fellowship Period: Fall 2021

Background

Seton Hall University Libraries support excellence in academic and individual work, enable inquiry, foster intellectual and ethical integrity and respect for diverse points of view through user-focused services and robust collections as the intellectual and cultural heart of the University.  Walsh Gallery, based in the Library, manages the University’s museum collections, and the Library’s Data Services division assists the University community in managing and presenting their data.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 06/16/2021 - 10:55am by Erik Shell.

The ACLS is running two searches this summer at ACLS. They seek a Program Officer in International Programs (regular ongoing staff position) and a Program Officer in Higher Education Initiatives (two year term).

These positions are excellent for classics Ph.D.s looking to stay in academic contexts but do a different kind of work from teaching and researching.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 06/16/2021 - 10:53am by Erik Shell.

The SCS Board of Directors has co-signed the following statement, which has been authored jointly by the American Association of University Professors, the American Historical Association, the Association of American Colleges & Universities, and PEN America. As of June 16, 2021, 80 organizations have endorsed the statement.

You can read the full text and list of signatories below and read the press release by the American Historical Association here

June 16, 2021

We, the undersigned associations and organizations, state our firm opposition to a spate of legislative proposals being introduced across the country that target academic lessons, presentations, and discussions of racism and related issues in American history in schools, colleges and universities. These efforts have taken varied shape in at least 20 states; but often the legislation aims to prohibit or impede the teaching and education of students concerning what are termed “divisive concepts.” These divisive concepts as defined in numerous bills are a litany of vague and indefinite buzzwords and phrases including, for example, “that any individual should feel or be made to feel discomfort, guilt, anguish, or any other form of psychological or emotional distress on account of that individual’s race or sex.” These legislative efforts are deeply troubling for numerous reasons.

View full article. | Posted in Public Statements on Wed, 06/16/2021 - 7:09am by Helen Cullyer.

TLL Fellowship 2021-2022 Application Cycle

Supported by a Generous Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:16pm by Erik Shell.

Call for papers: Human Crime and Divine Punishment in Ancient Didactic poetry

Trinity College Dublin, 10-11 March 2022

As has long been observed, ancient Didactic poetry is not merely a vehicle to convey technical information and instruction. Justice and the place of humanity in the cosmos are already central concerns of Hesiod’s Works and Days, which attributes the harsh realities of agricultural life to a history of transgression, moral decline, and punishment. Similar questions continue to fascinate his didactic successors, who not only develop Hesiodic material, for instance in the departure of Justice from Earth in Aratus’ Phaenomena, but also explore other manifestations of divine intervention, such as through myths of metamorphosis and catasterism. In some didactic poems, such as Virgil’s Georgics or Oppian’s Halieutica, the pursuit of their subject matter itself poses the risk of violating ethical norms or overstepping mortal boundaries.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:09pm by Erik Shell.

Reception Studies: State of the Discipline and New Directions

Online conference

 

24-27 June 2021 (Northern Hemisphere)

25-28 June 2021 (Southern Hemisphere)

Conference Organiser: Anastasia Bakogianni

Hosted by Massey University, New Zealand

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 5:03pm by Erik Shell.

City Lit, one of London’s largest adult education colleges, and the British Museum are organising Classics Week.

Classics Week runs from 21-25 June 2021 and takes inspiration from the British Museum’s current exhibition Nero: the man behind the myth (27 May- 24 Oct).  Join us for a programme of online talks, discussions, and taster courses exploring the subject of power in ancient Rome.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 4:40pm by Erik Shell.
A page from Martin Kraus’ Aethiopica Epitome processed using LatinOCR within VietOCR. It handles the opening chapter summary well but is only 88% accurate with the italicized body text.

LatinOCR and Rescribe are related optical character recognition (OCR) tools that substantially accelerate the conversion of scanned Latin to Unicode text and, in the case of Rescribe, to searchable PDF format. Both are pleasant to use but require a degree of comfort with command-line tools, at least to get up and running.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 06/14/2021 - 1:34pm by .

Pages

Latest Stories

Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
QUEEN: REIMAGINING POWER FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT
Calls for Papers
“What Has Antiquity Ever Done for Us?” The Vitality of Ancient Recept

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy