COVID-19 Measure: Annual Meeting Submission Deadlines

We realize that this is a time of unprecedented turmoil, disruption, and challenge in all our personal and professional lives. SCS is delaying deadlines for 2021 annual meeting program submission in the hope that some extra time will be helpful to anyone planning to submit. The new deadlines are:
 
- April 21 (by 11.59pm EDT) for all submissions other than individual abstracts and lightning talks
- April 28 (by 11.59pm EDT) for all individual abstracts and lightning talks
 
As circumstances change, we will continue to adapt. While it is too early to say what effect COVID-19 will have on our annual meeting in January 2021, we will adjust as necessary and provide an annual meeting in some form. 
 

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.
NEH seal

The Hill School and Valencia College invite applications to the NEH Institute, Timeless Parallels: Veteran Voices and Classical Literature

Eligibility:

This program is open to all secondary school teachers of Latin, Ancient Greek, English, or History.

Program Description:

This Institute will enable secondary school teachers to develop curriculum that draws parallels between the experience of veterans in the modern and ancient worlds, exploring such issues as homecoming and reintegration into civilian life; the treatment of veterans; the problem of war trauma and treatment of PTSD; and, the role of society in sharing the burdens of veteran experiences.

Program Costs:

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Sun, 02/20/2022 - 8:47pm by Helen Cullyer.
Eta Sigma Phi owl logo

Eta Sigma Phi has extended the deadline for all three of its 2022 Summer Travel Scholarships to March 1:

The Theodore Bedrick Scholarship provides funding for a Vergilian Society Tour in Italy: https://www.etasigmaphi.org/scholarships/summer-travel/bedrick/

The Brent Malcolm Froberg Scholarship provides funding for the Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens: https://www.etasigmaphi.org/scholarships/summer-travel/ascsa/

The America Academy in Rome scholarship provides funding for the AAR's Classical Summer School: https://www.etasigmaphi.org/scholarships/summer-travel/aar/

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Sun, 02/20/2022 - 6:38pm by Helen Cullyer.
front face of restored Harry Wilks Study Center at Villa Vergiliana

Would you like to direct a tour or workshop for the Vergilian Society in 2024? 

Vergilian Society tours are designed to appeal to a wide range of travelers interested in the ancient Mediterranean.  Our programs welcome college students, instructors and nonprofessionals.

For 2024, we are particularly interested in tours of the ancient Mediterranean or study programs (such as Latin workshops) that are based at the Villa Vergiliana, a study center in the Bay of Naples, Italy. 

If you have any questions about proposal submissions, please contact the Chair of the Villa Management Committee, John Wonder, at jwwonder@sfsu.edu 

You'll find previous tour details at https://www.vergiliansociety.org/previous-tours/

View full article. | Posted in Organizations on Fri, 02/18/2022 - 11:50am by Helen Cullyer.

Homer in Sicily: An Academic Conference and Tour of Ancient Sites

Exedra Mediterranean Center

October 5-8, 2022 [and post-conference tour October 9-10, 2022]

Homeric Thrinacia – our Sicily – is the legendary home of the Cattle of the Sun, the Cyclops, the Laestrygonians, Aeolus, and close neighbor of Skylla and Charybdis. Samuel Butler, in the nineteenth century, memorably theorized that the Odyssey’s author was a young Sicilian woman, glimpsed in the figure of Nausicaa. Otherwise, surprisingly few scholars have explored Sicily’s association with the Homeric epics, the Odyssey in particular. The goal of this conference is to bring scholars from a variety of disciplines to Siracusa to discuss Homer’s epic vision and to visit the archaeological traces of the mythic places and beings of the Odyssey.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/17/2022 - 4:04pm by .

(From Haverford College Communications)

Daniel Gillis, a member of the classics faculty for almost 40 years, died Dec. 3. He was 86. 

Gillis earned his B.A. from Harvard University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Cornell University before joining the Haverford faculty in September 1966. He was promoted to associate professor of classics in 1968 and full professor in 1976. 

He taught classes on Latin language and literature, Roman social history, and other courses outside the Department of Classics, such as “Fiction of the Holocaust.” He published numerous books including two volumes on German composer and conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler–1965’s Furtwängler Recalled and 1970’s Furtwängler and America– and a collection of largely autobiographical poems, 1979’s Vita. His other books included Collaboration with the Persians (1979), Measure of a Man (1982), and Eros and Death in the Aeneid (1983). In 1992, he was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquities of Scotland in recognition of his establishment of an institute for Scottish Highland Studies in Prince Edward Island.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Thu, 02/17/2022 - 3:49pm by .
The top half of a page from a Greek-English dictionary containing the entry for logos.

The Cambridge Greek Lexicon (CGL) set out to replace the Middle Liddell, a goal whose overwhelming success cannot be in doubt. Indeed, it puts the field of classical studies in the awkward position of having a student dictionary that is on sounder footing than its chief scholarly dictionary, and it seems likely that CGL will be the go-to resource not just for undergraduates but for grad students and scholars when reading classical Greek literature.

Yet the words “classical” and “literature” in the previous sentence carry a good deal of weight. In order for the dictionary to be completed in a reasonable amount of time, and at a size and cost that will be manageable for students, CGL excluded quite a bit of material. Its coverage “extends from Homer to the early second century AD (ending with Plutarch’s Lives)” (CGL 1: vii), but it covers this material selectively, and the focus is clearly on poetry from Homer to the Hellenistic period and on literary prose down to Aristotle. There is very little coverage of Roman-era works, religious works, technical works, and documentary works.

View full article. | Posted in on Tue, 02/15/2022 - 10:01am by .

The deadline for the next round of applications for the Ancient World, Modern Communities Initiative (formerly Classics Everywhere) is February 28, 2022.

We invite applications from individuals, organizations, and/or communities to apply to the “Ancient Worlds, Modern Communities” committee for mini-grants of up to $2,000 to support works that engage individuals, groups, and communities in critical discussion of and creative expression related to the ancient Mediterranean, the global reception of Greek and Roman culture, and the history of teaching and scholarship in the field of classical studies. Examples of successful projects include but are not limited to: public lectures; readings; discussion groups; performances; summer, after-school and weekend programs for school-age children; visual arts exhibits and installations; podcasts; and videos.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/09/2022 - 6:16pm by .

AIA/SCS Career Development Seminars 

Wednesday Feb 16, 2022 (4pm EST) and Thursday, March, 17, 2022 (4pm EST)

February 16, 4:00-5:00pm Eastern: Laura Surtees on libarianship. Laura is a Research and Instruction Librarian and coordinator of the specialty Rhys Carpenter Library at Bryn Mawr College. You can read Laura's biography and sign up at https://forms.gle/DMd298Rb5UJ2Ax3N9 .

The Career Development Seminar scheduled for Thursday, January 20, from 4:00-5:00pm  Eastern has been rescheduled for Thursday March 17, 4:00-5:00pm Eastern. It will feature Nathalie Roy and Michael Posey, talking about K-12 teaching. You can sign up for this seminar here: https://forms.gle/nJSMwGew5yWUmMAXA .

You can find more information about the AIA/SCS Career Development Seminars here: https://classicalstudies.org/placement/career-development-seminars .

Please email info@classicalstudies.org if you have any questions or concerns.

---

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Wed, 02/09/2022 - 9:52am by .

We are pleased to announce that Volume III, Issue I of The Haley Classical Journal is now live! 

In this issue of The Haley, explore topics ranging from Roman spolia to re-examinations of grief in the Iliad. You may read the full issue here, as well as our previous issues.

Our submission period for Volume III, Issue II (with publication in June of 2022) is now also open. We will be receiving papers until March 11, 2022. We encourage any students who will be undergraduates next semester to submit their work here, including those who have submitted work to us before!

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/08/2022 - 3:16pm by .
A woodcut of a black and white manuscript page with Latin text at the bottom. Above the text is an image of a woman covered in feathers with the wings and feet of a bird, thebreasts and face of a human woman, and long hair. A banner above her reads "FAMA"

In Plautus’s Mercator, the senex Demipho, the archetypal lecherous old man, attempts to justify to his son his purported decision not to purchase the puella Pasicompsa as a maid for their household. While the audience understands Demipho’s dissimulation — he will, as we know, purchase the girl to satiate his lascivious desires — the old man must trot out a believable excuse to the lovelorn adulescens, whose own parallel obsession with Pasicompsa motivates the plot of the play. Rather than appeal to expediency or even to economics, Demipho argues that the presence of the girl in their household would bring shame to the family and harm their reputation:

Because there would be a scandal if a woman of her appearance were to follow the mother of a household; were she to walk through the streets, everybody would stare at her, ogle her, nod to her, wink at her, whistle at her, pinch her, call after her, and be a nuisance. People would serenade mockingly at our door. With their pieces of charcoal the door would be filled with little ditties. And, given what crooked gossipers people are nowadays, they would disapprove of my wife and myself on the grounds that we were keeping a brothel. What on earth is that necessary for?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/07/2022 - 10:22am by .

Pages

Latest Stories

In Memoriam
Contributed by Hanna M. Roisman:
SCS Announcements
SCS Announcements
Symposium Cumanum – Call for Proposal

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy