Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3)

We are very pleased to announce the creation of the Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3), a new Digital Classics R&D unit embedded in the Duke University Libraries, whose start-up has been generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Duke University’s Dean of Arts & Sciences and Office of the Provost.

The DC3 goes live 1 July 2013, continuing a long tradition of collaboration between the Duke University Libraries and papyrologists in Duke’s Department of Classical Studies. The late Professors William H. Willis and John F. Oates began the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (DDbDP) more than 30 years ago, and in 1996 Duke was among the founding members of the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS). In recent years, Duke led the Mellon-funded Integrating Digital Papyrology effort, which brought together the DDbDP, Heidelberger Gesamtverzeichnis der Griechischen Papyrusurkunden Ägyptens (HGV), and APIS in a common search and collaborative curation environment (papyri.info), and which collaborates with other partners, including Trismegistos, Bibliographie Papyrologique, Brussels Coptic Database, and the Arabic Papyrology Database.

The DC3 team will see to the maintenance and enhancement of papyri.info data and tooling, cultivate new partnerships in the papyrological domain, experiment in the development of new complementary resources, and engage in teaching and outreach at Duke and beyond.

The team’s first push will be in the area of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, where it plans to leverage its papyrological experience to serve a much larger community. The team brings a wealth of experience in fields like image processing, text engineering, scholarly data modeling, and building scalable web services. It aims to help create a system in which the many worldwide digital epigraphy projects can interoperate by linking into the graph of scholarly relationships while maintaining the full force of their individuality.

The DC3 team is:

  • Ryan BAUMANN: Has worked on a wide range of Digital Humanities projects, from applying advanced imaging and visualization techniques to ancient artifacts, to developing systems for scholarly editing and collaboration.
  • Hugh CAYLESS: Has over a decade of software engineering expertise in both academic and industrial settings. He also holds a Ph.D. in Classics and a Master’s in Information Science. He is one of the founders of the EpiDoccollaborative and currently serves on the Technical Council of the Text Encoding Initiative.
  • Josh SOSIN: Associate Professor of Classical Studies and History, Co-Director of the DDbDP, Associate editor of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies; an epigraphist and papyrologist interested in the intersection of ancient law, religion, and the economy.

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We are pleased to announce that Volume III, Issue I of The Haley Classical Journal is now live! 

In this issue of The Haley, explore topics ranging from Roman spolia to re-examinations of grief in the Iliad. You may read the full issue here, as well as our previous issues.

Our submission period for Volume III, Issue II (with publication in June of 2022) is now also open. We will be receiving papers until March 11, 2022. We encourage any students who will be undergraduates next semester to submit their work here, including those who have submitted work to us before!

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/08/2022 - 3:16pm by .
A woodcut of a black and white manuscript page with Latin text at the bottom. Above the text is an image of a woman covered in feathers with the wings and feet of a bird, thebreasts and face of a human woman, and long hair. A banner above her reads "FAMA"

In Plautus’s Mercator, the senex Demipho, the archetypal lecherous old man, attempts to justify to his son his purported decision not to purchase the puella Pasicompsa as a maid for their household. While the audience understands Demipho’s dissimulation — he will, as we know, purchase the girl to satiate his lascivious desires — the old man must trot out a believable excuse to the lovelorn adulescens, whose own parallel obsession with Pasicompsa motivates the plot of the play. Rather than appeal to expediency or even to economics, Demipho argues that the presence of the girl in their household would bring shame to the family and harm their reputation:

Because there would be a scandal if a woman of her appearance were to follow the mother of a household; were she to walk through the streets, everybody would stare at her, ogle her, nod to her, wink at her, whistle at her, pinch her, call after her, and be a nuisance. People would serenade mockingly at our door. With their pieces of charcoal the door would be filled with little ditties. And, given what crooked gossipers people are nowadays, they would disapprove of my wife and myself on the grounds that we were keeping a brothel. What on earth is that necessary for?

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/07/2022 - 10:22am by .

Several affiliated groups have extended their deadlines in their calls for abstracts for the 2023 Annual Meeting:

American Classical League, Teaching Students to Read Latin: What does that mean?, February 10, 2022

Vergilian Society, Green Vergil: Nature and the Environment in Vergil and the Vergilian Tradition, February 11, 2022

Society for Late Antiquity, Slow and Fast Violence in Late Antiquity, February 15, 2022

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 02/07/2022 - 8:43am by .
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The American Council of Learned Societies Opens 2022 Leading Edge Fellowship Competition for Recent PhDs in the Humanities and Interpretive Social Sciences

Program Partners Early-Career Humanities Scholars with Nonprofit Organizations Advancing Social Justice

Fellowship applications due by 9pm EDT on Monday, March 28, 2022.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 02/02/2022 - 12:06pm by .

Announcing SOURCES IN EARLY POETICS, a new book series published by Brill

Online launch and roundtable: 16 March 2022 (1:30 PM – 3:00PM EDT)

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Wed, 02/02/2022 - 11:12am by .

The Department of the Classics at Harvard announces the following opportunities and initiatives designed to advance our community’s goals of diversity and inclusion:

Harvard Classics Scholars-in-Training Summer Program (for high school students (Remote) or undergraduates (In Person) Application deadline is Friday, February 25, 2022 by 11:59 p.m. EST.

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Wed, 02/02/2022 - 10:55am by .

Final Reminder: Revised 9/23/21 with updated submission deadline of Friday, February 18, 2022.

As previously announced, Patrice Rankine and Sasha-Mae Eccleston will serve as guest editors of a future issue of TAPA with the theme of race, racism, and Classics (issue 153:1, to appear April 2023). Their detailed call for papers, along with submission instructions, follows.

Covid-19 and the global Movement 4 Black Lives have highlighted the extent to which racism is a public health emergency whose reach extends across the Black Atlantic and far beyond. In light of these deeply imbricated developments, this volume becomes even more timely.

Race and Racism: Beyond the Spectacular

"…the “cultural logic” of lynching enables it to emerge and persist throughout the modern era because its violence “fit” within the broader, national cultural developments. This synchronicity captures why I refer to lynching as “spectacular”: the violence made certain cultural developments and tensions visible for Americans to confront."

       Jacqueline Goldsby, A Spectacular Secret: Lynching in American Life and Literature

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 01/31/2022 - 1:37pm by .
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Please join us on Monday, February 14, 2022, at 4:00-5:30pm EST, for a career webinar for PhDs and graduate students on K-12 teaching (registration required).

ACLS will offer a virtual presentation for PhDs and graduate students to learn about teaching roles in K-12 schools during a Q&A with people representing K-12 independent and public schools.

We hope this will prepare anyone interested in applying to K-12 independent and public schools for Fall 2022 teaching roles, which are advertised primarily in winter. Teaching at public schools is a less immediate option because of certification and degree requirements which vary by state, so most of our panelists teach in independent schools, which don’t require certification.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 01/28/2022 - 9:33am by .

In 2022 the Society for Classical Studies (SCS) will again award the David D. and Rosemary H. Coffin Fellowship for study and travel in classical lands.

The Fellowship is intended to recognize secondary-school teachers of Greek or Latin who are as dedicated to their students as the Coffins themselves by giving them the opportunity to enrich their teaching and their lives through direct acquaintance with the classical world.  It will support study in classical lands (not limited to Greece and Italy); the recipient may use it to attend an educational program in (e.g. American Academy, American School) or to undertake an individual plan of study or research. It may be used either for summer study or during a sabbatical leave, and it may be used to supplement other awards or prizes.

You can read more about this fellowship here: Coffin Fellowship Flyer or for full details and instructions please visit the David D. and Rosemary H. Coffin Fellowship page. Materials must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on Thursday, February 17, 2022.

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 01/27/2022 - 8:16am by Helen Cullyer.

Digital Ancient Rome

An NEH Summer Seminar for K-12 educators

Digital Ancient Rome is an NEH Summer Seminar for K-12 educators that will give teachers an opportunity to learn about important examples of Roman art, architecture, and archaeology through a broad range of digital resources. One of the most exciting things for students who study ancient Rome is that so many physical aspects of its civilization survive to this day. It is not just an ancient history that we know through texts. The surviving material remains—small artifacts, sculpture, paintings, mosaics, public monuments, neighborhoods, and whole cities—tell a variety of stories about the ancient world, and they bring history to life in a way that students find compelling.  

Dates: July 18-29, 2022

Place: Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 01/26/2022 - 8:40pm by Helen Cullyer.

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