Emergency Grant Funding from NEH

NEH is offering emergency grants and the opportunity for affected institutions to repurpose existing grants.

For more information, visit the NEH announcement page.


(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)


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By Andaleeb Badiee Banta (Curator of European and American Art, Allen Memorial Art Museum, abanta@oberlin.edu) and Christopher Trinacty (Associate Professor of Classics at Oberlin College, ctrinact@oberlin.edu)

Campus museums can help professors not only to teach about the ancient world, but also to explore connections between different civilizations, time periods, and media. At Oberlin College, professors engage with the collection at the Allen Memorial Art Museum to teach a variety of topics – from philosophy to cinema studies, from anthropology to book studies. This collaboration between professors and the museum’s curators creates evocative and unexpected links for both students and professors, aiding in the interdisciplinary exploration of material.

View full article. | Posted in on Sun, 03/04/2018 - 1:31pm by Andaleeb Badiee Banta.
Manuscript of Megillat Esther, dating to the 18th century and currently housed in the Joods Historisch Museum in Amsterdam. Photo by Vassil, licensed under CC0 1.0. Edited (cropped) by C. Bonesho.
In her monthly column, Catherine Bonesho will feature discussions of Greco-Roman age Judaism, the Roman Near East, as well as the American Academy in Rome. For her first monthly column, she explores the Roman context for the Jewish holiday of Purim.

According to historian Amnon Linder, there are approximately 107 imperial Roman laws that concern Jews and Judaism and, for the most part, one can find them in the Theodosian and Justinianic Codes.[1] Roman imperial legislation on Jews and Judaism ranges from discussing circumcision to synagogues and the Sabbath, among other topics. However, one can also find a peculiar law, dating to the early fifth century CE, that establishes Roman policy on the Jewish holiday known as Purim.

This year Purim will be celebrated at sundown on February 28. In this blog, I focus on a Roman law found in the Theodosian Code (16:8:18) that deals with the celebration of Purim and briefly discuss how this law not only aids in understanding Jews and Judaism in Roman antiquity, but also how it helps decipher religious competition during the period known as Late Antiquity (200-800 CE).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/26/2018 - 5:03pm by Catherine Bonesho.


Classical Antiquity: Screening the “political animals” of the Ancient Mediterranean world

An area of multiple panels for the 2018 Film & History Conference:

Citizenship and Sociopathy in Film, Television, and New Media

November 7-12, 2018

Madison Concourse Hotel and Governor’s Club, Madison, WI (USA)

Full details at: www.filmandhistory.org/conference

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2018 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 02/26/2018 - 10:20am by Erik Shell.

by Patrice Rankine

One of the precepts of Joseph Campbell’s Hero of a Thousand Faces, in fact of his life work of studying myth, generally, is that myth is truer than the truth itself. The metaphoric power of storytelling is such that the story precedes reality. When one deploys the metaphor “my love is a red rose,” the statement suggests the profound truth of the beauty of love, its exquisiteness, its sensual power.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 02/26/2018 - 6:31am by .

By Adrienne K.H. Rose

In her monthly column, Prof. Adrienne K.H. Rose explores issues surrounding translation within Classics. In her first edition, she addresses the challenges of picking the “right” Catullus translation. What does “right” even mean when choosing a translation for class?

Choosing the “right” translation of any Classical author for the classroom is a challenge for most teachers. What is “right” can often be dependent upon factors such as availability and pricing, particularly for students with a textbook budget. For a popular, much-translated poet like Catullus there is a wealth of English-language translations to choose from. Catullus is antiquity’s most modern poet.

His work is raunchy, moody, turbulently charged political and social commentary – my advanced Latin students called him “emo”—his carmina akin to unfiltered Facebook status updates perhaps better left unposted. At the same time they’re fastidious metrically, driven by Hellenic fascination (Grecomania?), and fixated by core human emotions and needs: internal conflict, affection, lust, mourning, and spite. Because Catullus is so contemporary, translations reinvent his persona anew with updated, contemporary language and cultural references.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 02/23/2018 - 5:21am by Adrienne K.H. Rose.
St Andrews Graduate Conference in Ancient Philosophy 2018, on:
Teleology, Intelligence and Life in the Platonic and Aristotelian Tradition
Teleology plays a central role in both Plato’s and Aristotle’s philosophy. It is essential in particular for their cosmological views and their conceptions of intelligence (nous) and life. We are interested in a deeper understanding of both Plato’s and Aristotle’s approach to teleology in all their aspects and the principal differences between them. We invite graduate students to submit high-quality papers on any topic related to teleology within the Platonic or Aristotelian tradition, broadly construed, in antiquity.
 Keynote Speakers:
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 2:30pm by Erik Shell.

The Organizer Refereed Panel "Thirty Years of the Jeweled Style" has extended its deadline for abstract submission to March 5th.

See the original CFP here: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2017/150/call-abstracts-thir...


(Photo: "Handwritten" by A. Birkan, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 11:29am by Erik Shell.

Τὰ μεταξύ - Knowing where to draw the line: Intermediates and Dianoia in Plato

Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College
5353 Parkside Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458

We read in Aristotle’s Metaphysics that Plato regarded mathematical objects as intermediate between forms and particulars (987b14-18). Nowhere in the dialogues does Socrates talk explicitly about these “intermediates,” although it could be argued that there are several texts in which the intermediates are implied. Even if the intermediates were implied, however, it is not at all clear that they match up with the account that Aristotle gives us. The purpose of this event is to reconsider the evidence for and against the intermediates in the Platonic dialogues. Presentations on the ontological status of the objects of dianoia in Plato will be included.

Friday morning until early evening, we will discuss what Aristotle says in his Metaphysics, hear arguments about the implications of his claims and discuss the possibility of intermediates in the Phaedo. Saturday morning until early afternoon there will be presentations of papers and outlines of ideas regarding the possible intermediates in Plato’s Republic and the later dialogues as well as the ontological status of the objects of dianoia.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 10:43am by Erik Shell.



September 28 – 30, 2018

The Program in Classical and Medieval Studies at Bates College invites papers on any topic related to new approaches to the cultures of the ancient Greco-Roman Mediterranean, for a day-long graduate symposium showcasing the work of emerging scholars (recent PhD or ABD) from historically underrepresented groups.

The symposium will showcase new work by individuals from underrepresented groups in the professoriate, specifically defined as including African Americans, Alaska Natives, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Latinx, Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/20/2018 - 2:08pm by Erik Shell.

(Originally posted on Facebook by the Vergilian Society by Jim O'Hara)

The Vergilian Society notes with sadness the passing of Professor Eleanor Winsor Leach of the University of Indiana, who served the Society as a trustee in 1978-83 and as second and then first vice-president in 1989-92. Vergilians learned much from her articles on the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid, her landmark 1974 book on the Eclogues, her two major studies on the ties that link Roman literature, art, and society, and her many many articles on Latin poetry and painting and their reception. Both her many students, and all those of us who learned from her writings, will carry on her work and her memory.

(From Matthew Christ)

The Department of Classical Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, is very sorry to report that Eleanor W. Leach died on Friday, February 16, at the age of 80. Ellie will be sorely missed by all of us; it was characteristic of her strong spirit and commitment that she remained active as teacher and scholar up until the very end. We will circulate information concerning a service in her memory as soon as this is available.


The memorial service for Eleanor W. Leach is scheduled for:

Saturday, April 21, 11 a.m.

Trinity Episcopal Church 

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 02/20/2018 - 1:29pm by Erik Shell.


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