Fellowship: Advanced Seminar in the Humanities (2018-2019)

Advanced Seminar in the Humanities 2018– 2019
Literature and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean: Greece, Rome, and the Near East

From March 12 to March 23, 2018 Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, in cooperation with Venice International University, will offer an advanced seminar on “Literature and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and the Near East”.

The Program

The program is conceived as a two year commitment over two successive years (2018 and 2019). The first session (March 12-23, 2018) will consist of lectures by scholars with a seminar approach on the origins and development of literary genres and literacy in Ancient Greece, Rome and the Near East. Some of the lectures will run simultaneously and will be devoted respectively to the interpretation of specific classical and near Eastern texts, with more focus on textual analysis. An evening lecture by an invited speaker special is also under consideration.

The lectures will alternate with a series of site visits, for example, to the Marciana Library, the Library of San Lazzaro degli Armeni, and the Basilica of San Marco.

The aim of the program is firstly to investigate the relationship between themes, motifs and structures of the texts and/or of the myths involved, starting with the early examples of epic poetry and of wisdom and didactic literature; secondly, to examine the processes involved in their transmission and preservation in both oral and written forms. A variety of issues concerning recently published texts and/or the history of literate cultures may also be reviewed, such as, for example, the textual traditions, the creation and organization of libraries, the classification of genres, and the relationship between literature and politics, and between literature and religion.

During the first session the fellows will identify a research project according to their own scholarly interests and under the supervision of one of the faculty. The research project will be presented in the form of an essay of about 15/20 pages in the second session of the seminar, which will run in 2019 (an 8-day slot, still to be determined). 


(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)


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We have updated our resource on teacher certification requirements in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia.

Read more here.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/19/2017 - 10:41pm by Helen Cullyer.

"Unguentarıuma terracotta vessel form and other related vessels ın the hellenıstıc, roman and early byzantıne medıterranean - an ınternatıonal symposıum"

May 17-18, 2018 / Izmir, Turkey
with an excursion to Lesbos, Greece on May 19-21, 2018

Dear Colleagues,

The Izmir Center of the Archaeology of Western Anatolia (EKVAM) is glad to inform you that an international symposium on unguentarium, a terracotta vessel form in the Hellenistic, Roman and early Byzantine Mediterranean, will take place on May 17-18, 2017 at the Dokuz Eylül University (DEU) in Izmir, Turkey. An unguentarium (plural “unguentaria”) is a small ceramic or glass bottle, found in relatively large quantities in the entire Mediterranean, from Spain to Syria and Egypt to France, where they were produced between the early Hellenistic and early Medieval periods. The terracotta version of this form is a typically narrow-necked vessel shape, topped with a slender neck and a thin-lipped rim. The base of these vessels can be in some cases rounded or fusiform -- in which case it is not self-standing -- or flat-bottomed. Its shape was changed in several periods, but especially during the mid second century B.C. Beside the common term unguentarium, which is a modern invitation, this vessel type was also called as “balsamare”, “ampulle”, “lacramarium” or “flacon” etc.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 12/19/2017 - 9:04am by Erik Shell.
Interiority in Roman Literature
Pacific Rim Roman Literature Seminar 32
University of Sydney, 11 to 13 July 2018
The thirty-second meeting of the PacRim Roman Literature Seminar will be held at the University of Sydney from 11 to 13 July 2018. The theme for the 2018 conference will be interiority in Roman literature.
Papers are invited to explore Roman literature’s inner voices, visions and narratives; psychologies; inner lives; the ‘inward turn’ of Roman literature at various periods, such as the first and fourth centuries; interior spaces; inner sanctums and circles of power. Roman literature is conceived of as the literature of Roman world from its earliest beginnings to the end of antiquity. The theme may be interpreted broadly, and papers on other topics will also be considered.
View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:12pm by Erik Shell.


After the Socratica Conferences (Socratica 2005, held in Senigallia, Socratica 2008, held in Napoli, and Socratica 2012 held in Trento), and the respective proceedings published in 2008, 2010 and 2013, we are pleased to announce the SOCRATICA IV Conference to be held in Buenos Aires on November 13-16, 2018 at the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
We invite submissions of proposals related to any of the following areas: 
a) The figure and thought of Socrates
b) Socratic and anti-Socratic literature, i.e. texts and fragments of Ancient Comedy, first-generation Socratics, Polycrates, Isocrates and so on
c) Philosophy and thought of the first-generation Socratics
d) Historiographical problems related to the Socratic circle 
e) Key notions, such as sophistes and philosophos, before, during, and after Socrates time

Call for papers 

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:08pm by Erik Shell.

Diversity and Uniformity in the Archaic Greek World

On 23-25 May 2018, leading scholars from around the world will gather at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire in the United States to explore diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world. All of the speakers are contributors to the forthcoming Oxford History of the Archaic Greek World (OHAGW), edited by Paul Cartledge (Cambridge University) and Paul Christesen (Dartmouth College).  OHAGW will provide detailed studies of 29 sites, sanctuaries, and regions in Greece during the Archaic period. Each essay in OHAGW will be built around the same set of eleven rubrics, so that it will be possible to read either vertically (reading a complete study of a single site) or horizontally (reading, for example, about the economic history of a number of different sites). Taken together, these studies will add unprecedented depth and subtlety to our evidence for and understanding of diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world.

The speakers at this conference will discuss how the particular site, sanctuary or region about which they are writing for OHAGW contributes to our understanding of diversity and uniformity in the Archaic Greek world. The schedule of the conference – all sessions of which will be plenary – is such as to leave a considerable amount of time for questions, answers, and general discussion.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 3:02pm by Erik Shell.

The SCS Outreach Panel is soliciting questions to address at the SCS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Click on this link to submit your questions about outreach activities of the SCS: https://goo.gl/forms/KWrE8y45PhKDUjFY2


(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 1:44pm by Erik Shell.
Alexander the Great and King Poros

Jacoby Online is a monumental resource encompassing several separate projects, all of them related to Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker (FGrH) of Felix Jacoby (1876–1959). The original reference work aimed to collect, edit, and comment on all the known testimonies[1] and fragments of ancient Greek historians whose works survive incomplete. At the time of his death, Jacoby had produced fifteen print volumes covering 856 historians, distributed among three of five proposed areas: (I) genealogy and mythography, (II) history (Zeitgeschichte), and (III) local history (Horographie) and ethnography. Work resumed in 1991 under a team of European scholars on two remaining areas, which were planned but never completed by Jacoby: (IV) biography and antiquarian literature (of which three out of a proposed 27 volumes have now been published in print); and (V) historical geography (a work in progress to be completed in 2019 and eventually to be published in print).

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 12/18/2017 - 12:00am by Matt Simonton.

Congratulations to Michele Valerie Ronnick and Ruth Scodel, who were both awarded Lifetime Achievement Awards by Eta Sigma Phi this Fall. Read more about the awardees and their achievements in Nuntius, Eta Sigma Phi's publication.  


(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 12/14/2017 - 3:11pm by .
NEH Logo

Below is a list of the most recent NEH grantees and their Classically-themed projects. The NEH helps fund a number of SCS initiatives, and their support affects the field of Classics at a national and local level.

  • Philip Sapirstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln): "The Ancient Greek Temple of Hera at Olympia: A Digital Architectural History"
  • Ryan Horne (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill): "Understanding Ancient Economic and Social Networks Based on Evidence from Aeolian Coins" 
  • Etienne Helmer (University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras): "Ancient Greek Philosophers on Economics"
  • Michele Lowrie (University of Chicago) "The Concept of Security in Ancient Roman Literature and Politics"
  • Craig Williams (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) "Orpheus Crosses the Atlantic: Native American Knowledge of Ancient Greece and Rome"
  • Susan Collins (University of Notre Dame) "Constituting the Ancient City: The Political Regime and Classical Sparta" 


(Photo: "Logo of the United States National Endowment for the Humanities" by National Endowment for the Humanities, public domain, edited to fit thumbnail template)

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Thu, 12/14/2017 - 2:56pm by .

Ancient Greek and Roman Painting and the Digital Humanities

6th-8th August, 2018 at Tufts University

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 12/14/2017 - 2:14pm by .


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