Fellowship: UVA's "Bridge to the Doctorate"

As part of its commitment to diversifying the graduate student body and the field more generally, the Department of Classics at the University of Virginia seeks to support students from groups that are underrepresented in our discipline and who have not yet received sufficient training and research experience to prepare them for admission to doctoral programs. The Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia is accepting applications to join the first cohort of Bridge to the Doctorate Fellows for enrollment in Fall 2020. The Bridge Fellowship is a fully funded two-year program assisting gifted and hard-working students in Classics to acquire research and language skills needed to pursue a Ph.D. in Classics. The Fellowship is geared exclusively to assist the professional and personal development of the Fellow, and as such it comes without teaching responsibilities. Fellows will receive $24,000 per year in living support and full payment of their tuition, and fees, and single-person coverage in the University’s student health insurance plan for a period of two years.

Our Bridge program provides two full years of fellowship support without teaching responsibilities for students to enroll in a combination of courses, guided research opportunities and UVA’s intensive graduate student professional development curriculum known as “PhD Plus.” Each Bridge fellow will work individually with faculty to develop a customized academic plan that will identify opportunities for additional disciplinary training, enable them to cultivate writing and research skills specific to their chosen field of expertise, and develop a competitive portfolio for applying to doctoral programs. Predicated on a student’s strong and sustained performance during the Bridge Fellowship, the Department of Classics is committed either to admitting qualified Fellows directly into the PhD program following the successful completion of the Fellowship or to assist Fellows with their applications to other PhD programs. The M.A. may be awarded upon the successful completion of the Departmental M.A. requirements (http://classics.as.virginia.edu/requirements-exams-reading-lists).

We encourage individuals from diverse ethnic groups, economically disadvantaged / low-income backgrounds, and first-generation college students to apply. Applications are accepted at: http://graduate.as.virginia.edu/bridge-doctorate

Prerequisites and Criteria

Applicants for the Bridge Fellowship should have completed two years of college level training in one of the ancient languages (Latin or Greek), and preferably one year in the other. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

In case of queries and for more information about the Bridge Fellowship in Classics, please contact: Coulter George (chg4n@virginia.edu).

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(Photo: "library" by Viva Vivanista, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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