Good News about the German Office of L'Annee

In April I briefed members on behalf of the Board about the funding threat to the German office of L'Année and promised to update members when we had further news (http://apaclassics.org/index.php/apa_blog/apa_blog_entry/3325/). I am delighted to pass along the following letter of 11 August 2012 from SIBC President Margarethe Billerbeck:

Jeff Henderson

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Dear Friends and Colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that I can inform you that the German Arbeitsstelle of L’Année Philologique can continue after the end of the current year. Professor Martin Hose has successfully negotiated the transfer of the present Arbeitsstelle from Heidelberg to the University of Munich which is prepared to finance and house the new équipe. This will include a full-time collaborator, a part-time collaborator as well as two assistants (‘Hilfskräfte’). The present guarantee is for three years with the possibility of renewal. At a time when public finances are severely strained this is an excellent outcome of what seemed an almost hopeless situation. We will have an occasion to express our sincere gratitude to Professor Hose for his untiring effort to convince the authorities of his University to accept this charge when he joins us at the Annual Meeting of the SIBC in Paris in November.

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"'Heracles to Alexander the Great: Treasures from the Royal Capital of Macedon, a Hellenic Kingdom in the Age of Democracy' is as crowded with objects as its title is with ideas. The Ashmolean manages to cram in about 500 objects, discovered in the royal tombs and palaces of Aegae (modern-day Vergina in the north of Greece), most of which are being displayed for the very first time." Read more at The Wall Street Journal.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Fri, 05/06/2011 - 2:11am by Information Architect.

"The transformation of humans into monsters or animals is a standard feature of two great genres: classical Greek and Roman myth and American comic books. As those of us know who spent our childhoods and teenaged years greedily hoarding the latter, such transformations are only occasionally effected by a mere change of costume. Batman, for instance (introduced in 1939), is an ordinary Homo sapiens who simply dons his bat-like hood and cape when he wants to battle evildoers; his extraordinary powers are the fruit of disciplined intellectual and physical training. More often—and more excitingly—the metamorphoses occur at the genetic level. The Incredible Hulk, who debuted in 1962, is a hypertrophied Hercules-like giant, the Mr. Hyde aspect of an otherwise mild-mannered scientist named Bruce Banner, created during a laboratory accident involving gamma rays. Wolverine, one of the X-men, who sports lupine traits following his transformations, belongs to a despised race of “mutants” with remarkable powers. (The comic book series, now reincarnated as a hugely popular film franchise, debuted in 1963.)" Read more at The New York Review of Books.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

"Jeffrey Henderson, the University’s William Goodwin Aurelio Professor of Greek Language and Literature and a world-renowned classics scholar, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS)." Read the article at BU Today.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:21am by .

"Keeping the tradition of oral recitation alive in the age of technological storytelling, the University Classics Club hosted Homerathon, a 15-hour long recital of Homer’s The Odyssey." Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:35am by Information Architect.

"The University of Florida College of Fine Arts and Digital Worlds Institute has been awarded $50,000 by the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities." Read more…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:30am by Information Architect.

The phrase “Temenid dynasty” doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue. But this august lineage, which produced Philip II and Alexander the Great, was key to the development of the Western world. And in the Ashmolean’s dazzling display of archaeological finds the history of early Greece comes alive. Read more at The Telegraph.com…

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:28am by Information Architect.

A 2,000-year-old Roman ship in the middle of a plain near the ancient port of Rome has been unearthed by Italian archaeologists. Read more in Discovery News

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:25am by Information Architect.

The American Philological Association seeks to appoint an Editor for Monographs for a term of four years, to begin with the January 2012 meetings in Philadelphia.  We seek a senior scholar with editorial experience and an interest in shaping outstanding work for publication in a distinguished series.  The editor reviews proposals and manuscripts, works with authors to bring manuscripts to final form, and is the Association's contact with the publisher through the process.  While we continue our relationship with Oxford University Press, we particularly seek an editor willing to explore alternate and innovative forms of publication for appropriate scholarly works. Candidates should submit, and nominees will be invited to submit, a current c.v. and a brief statement outlining their interest. Applications and nominations may be submitted in confidence to the Vice President for Publications at provost@georgetown.edu. Consideration of candidates, who must be members of the APA in good standing, will begin on or after June 1, 2011. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 7:14pm by .

The Winter 2011 APA Newsletter is now online. A printable pdf version is coming soon.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 1:54am by .

The Penn Libraries have received a major collection of 280 Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts, valued at over $20 million, from long-time benefactors and Library Board members Lawrence J. Schoenberg (C’53, WG’57, PAR’93) and Barbara Brizdle Schoenberg. To promote the use of this and other manuscript collections at Penn, the Libraries will create the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies.

Full press release:
http://www.library.upenn.edu/docs/publications/SchoenbergMssCollection.pdf

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 1:47am by Information Architect.

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