Hellenic (formerly Library) Research Fellowship Program (HRFP)

Call for Applications: Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection
Hellenic (formerly Library) Research Fellowship Program 2022-2023

**Contingent on continued on-campus operations during 2022-2023 academic year**

Thanks to generous ongoing funding from the Elios Charitable Foundation, the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Foundation, and the Tarbell Family Foundation, the University Library is pleased to offer the continuation of the Hellenic (formerly Library) Research Fellowship Program (HRFP) for a 10th year. The name change is intended to better convey and reflect the focus of the program. The Program supports the use of the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection by fellows for scholarly research in Hellenic studies while in residence in Sacramento, CA.

The HRFP provides a limited number of fellowships (5-8 this year) ranging from $1,500 to $5,000 in the form of reimbursement to help offset transportation and living expenses incurred in connection with the awards. Since the Program’s inception in 2012, twenty-eight fellows in Hellenic studies from 11 countries, including seven independent scholars and 14 women, have benefitted from sustained access to the collection in support of original scholarly research. Thus far these research stays have directly contributed to the fruition of at least 10 conference papers, five journal articles, four book chapters, two completed doctoral dissertations, and one monograph.

The Program is open to external researchers anywhere in the world at the graduate through senior scholar levels (including independent scholars) working in fields encompassed by the Collection's strengths who reside outside a 75-mile radius of Sacramento. The term of fellowships can vary between two weeks and three months, depending on the nature of the research, and for the current cycle will be tenable from September 1, 2022-August 31, 2023. Please note that due to the uncertainty of the pandemic going forward, the HRFP is contingent on continued on-campus operations beginning fall 2022. Should this not be possible due to the pandemic, fellowship offers will be deferred until such time as awardees can opt to accept or decline them.

The fellowship application deadline is May 13, 2022. No late applications will be considered.

Consisting of the holdings of the former Speros Basil Vryonis Center for the Study of Hellenism, the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection is the premier Hellenic collection in the western United States and one of the largest of its kind in the country, currently numbering approximately 78,000 volumes and over 450 linear feet of archives. It comprises a large circulating book collection, journal holdings, electronic resources, non-print media materials, rare books, archival materials, art and artifacts. With its focus on the Hellenic world, the Collection contains early through contemporary materials across the social sciences and humanities relating to Greece, the Balkans, the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey, and the surrounding region, with particular strengths in Byzantine, post-Byzantine, and Modern Greek studies, including the Greek diaspora worldwide. There is a broad representation of over 20 languages in the Collection, with a rich assortment of primary source materials. For further information about the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, visit https://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection .

For the full Library Research Fellowship Program description and application instructions, see: https://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection/hrfp .

Questions about the Program can be directed to George I. Paganelis, Curator, Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection (paganelis@csus.edu).

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(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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