International Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis IX – Szeged 2022

Call for Papers

Sapiens Ubique Civis IX – Szeged 2022

PhD Student and Young Scholar Conference on Classics and the Reception of Antiquity

Szeged, Hungary, August 31–September 2, 2022

The Department of Classical Philology and Neo-Latin Studies, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary is pleased to announce its International Conference Sapiens Ubique Civis IX – Szeged 2022, for PhD Students, Young Scholars, as well as M.A. students aspiring to apply to a PhD program.

The aim of the conference is to bring together an international group of young scholars working in various places, languages, and fields. Papers on a wide range of subjects, including but not limited to the literature, history, philology, philosophy, linguistics and archaeology of Greece and Rome, Byzantinology, Neo-Latin studies, and reception of the classics, as well as papers dealing with theatre studies, digital humanities, comparative literature, contemporary literature, and fine arts related to the Antiquity are welcome. We are also happy to accept submissions concerning didactic methods in teaching Latin and other classical subjects.

The conference is planned to be held as a traditional “offline” one. If the pandemic situation makes it necessary to switch to online, we will inform you in due course.

Lectures: The language of the conference is English. Thematic sessions and plenary lectures will be scheduled. The time limit for each lecture is 20 minutes, followed by discussion.

Abstracts: Abstracts of maximum 300 words should be sent by email as a Word attachment to sapiensuc@gmail.com strictly before June 15, 2022. The abstracts should be proofread by a native speaker. The document should also contain personal information of the author, including name, affiliation and contact email address, as well as the title of the presentation. 

Acceptance notification will be sent to you until July 5, 2022.

Registration: The registration fee for the conference is €60. The participation fee includes conference pack, reception meal, closing event, extra programs, and refreshments during coffee breaks. The participation fee does not include accommodation, but the conference coordinators will assist the conference participants in finding accommodation in the city centre.

If the conference will take place as an online one, the registration fee will be reduced.

Publication: All papers will be considered for publication in the peer-reviewed journal on Classics entitled Sapiens ubique civis, published in cooperation with the ELTE Eötvös József Collegium.

Getting here: Szeged, the largest city of Southern Hungary, can be easily reached by rail from Budapest and the Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport. Those who prefer travelling by car can choose the European route E75, and then should take the Hungarian M5 motorway, a section of E75, passing by the city.

For general inquiries about the conference, please contact Dr Gergő Gellérfi: gellerfigergo@gmail.com.

We look forward to your participation in this conference.

Kind regards,

Dr János Nagyillés PhD
Chairman of the Conference Committee

Dr habil. Ibolya Tar CSc; Prof László Szörényi DSc; Dr György Fogarasi PhD
Dr Gergő Gellérfi PhD; Dr Endre Ádám Hamvas PhD; Dr Imre Áron Illés PhD;
Dr Tamás Jászay PhD; Dr habil. Péter Kasza PhD; Dr Ferenc Krisztián Szabó PhD;
Members of the Conference Committee

Fanni Csapó; Bianka Csapó; Attila Hajdú; Dr Tamás Jászay PhD; Dr Gergő Gellérfi PhD
Conference coordinators

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