Letter on the Annual Meeting from Joseph Farrell

January 15, 2018

Dear Members,

Looking back on the recently concluded Annual Meeting, I’m of two minds. For those who took part, I think it was a big success. Newer-format events, like Career Networking and Ancient Maker Spaces, were really lively and well attended, especially by younger members. Georgia Nugent’s presidential panel on the PhD as a launching pad for careers other than college teaching was really inspiring. And the Program Committee’s special session on “Rhetoric: Then and Now” brought our professional responsibility to be political into the spotlight in a way that I feel was both fruitful and long overdue.

The success of these events is all the more impressive because every one of them underwent major changes at the last minute when key participants simply could not make it to Boston because of the weather. Amazingly few sessions were actually cancelled. But if you couldn’t get to Boston, it wasn’t a good convention for you. I’m very sorry for those whose travel plans were thwarted, and I’m extremely grateful to all those got there in spite of the extra effort, expense, and delay that it cost. Frankly, your success in doing so probably saved the convention from being a total disaster.

(Speaking of expense, Helen Cullyer and her staff are working with those who couldn’t get in to mitigate their financial exposure. Everyone affected has now received instructions on requesting refunds.)

Since this is the second Annual Meeting in four years to suffer the impact of extreme winter weather, many members are asking why we continue to meet in early January and in cities like Boston and Chicago. The question is important, and we have to take it seriously. Two events like this in just four years could be coincidental, but in view of all of the other extreme weather events in recent years, you would have to be a climate-change denier to think that this won’t happen again. So the issue is now top priority for the SCS Board of Directors, and I was happy to learn that Jodi Magness, the President of the AIA, is more than willing to work with us.

That said, just what to do is not obvious. Many members already wonder why we don’t meet more often in warm-weather cities, but even at this time of year we do not have our pick of venues; far from it. Next year, at least, we do have San Diego, and we can look forward to celebrating the Society’s Sesquicentennial in a warm climate. Still, another badly timed storm on the east coast or in the midwest might prevent many of us from arriving in time for the start of the conference. So, in addition to the question of where we meet, we also have to raise the question of when.

We have already signed contracts through 2024, and the time to identify venues for the years beyond that — while they are still available — is now. If we moved to a new time of year in 2025, we would have to avoid conflicts with CAMWS, CAAS, and the other Classical organizations, as well as with CAA, AAR-SBL, and other conventions that our members attend. Holidays and teaching schedules also come into play. It would not be easy. These are the reasons why we meet when we do, in the first place, and it is not impossible that we will continue to do so, although something has to be done to mitigate the risk of another Bomb Cyclone or Polar Vortex. Disruptions like that are bad for our members — especially younger members, those with families, those who have no access to research and travel funds, and so on — and they threaten the Society’s financial health while taxing our professional staff, who worked heroically to keep the most recent convention on track, and who are still dealing with a vastly more complicated aftermath than they expected. Thanks to them, as well as to all of you who made it to Boston in spite of everything, the convention was, against the odds, a success, intellectually and socially. And I promise that we will do everything possible to ensure that future events will be even more successful, and that the risk of weather-related disruption will be as small as possible.

Sincerely,

Joseph Farrell

SCS President, 2018

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

The Classics Graduate Forum at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is seeking papers for a graduate colloquium entitled “Constructing Identity in the Ancient World.” The colloquium will take place on October 26-27, 2018 and will feature a keynote address by Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer (University of Chicago). Submissions from all disciplines and approaches are encouraged, and we invite you to pass the attached Call for Papers along to all graduate students and departments that may be interested.

Abstract submissions are due June 1, 2018 and should be submitted to uwclassics.colloquium@gmail.com (see the CfP for guidelines). Any questions can be directed to the same email address or to amy.hendricks@wisc.edu.

---

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 04/30/2018 - 12:27pm by Erik Shell.
3rd c. CE Palmyrene Funerary Inscription and Bust from the Princeton Museum of Art (Photo by Sarah E. Bond).

How can digital humanities projects within the field of Classics preserve and allow public access to endangered materials? The Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscription Project (WPAIP) is already addressing theses question head-on. WPAIP is a digital humanities project housed at the Digital Collections of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and established by Jeremy M. Hutton. Similar to the Palmyra Portrait Project of Aarhus University in Denmark, which works to collate and digitize Palmyrene portraiture, the primary goal of WPAIP is to collate and digitize Palmyrene Aramaic inscriptions. This allows researchers to then analyze the language of Palmyrene Aramaic, the development and variations of its script, and other features.

Though these inscriptions are usually from the ancient city of Palmyra, they can also be found throughout the ancient Roman world, including Roman Britain and in the city of Rome itself. In fact, some feature bilingual and trilingual inscriptions with Latin and Greek texts that range from funerary inscriptions to dedicatory altars.

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 04/27/2018 - 7:37am by Catherine Bonesho.

“Constructing Identity in the Ancient World”

Madison, WI: October 26-27, 2018

8th Annual Graduate Colloquium

Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Keynote presentation by

Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer

Helen A. Regenstein Distinguished Service Professor of Classics and the Program in Gender Studies

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 04/25/2018 - 11:55am by Helen Cullyer.

Nominations for the SCS Awards for Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level are due on June 1, 2018.  Nominate an excellent teacher today!  You can find more information about the award and nomination process here.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 04/24/2018 - 9:49am by Helen Cullyer.

SCS is pleased to announce two winners of this year's Koenen Fellowships for Training in Papyrology:

Chaya Cassano, CUNY Graduate Center and Queens College

Phillip Caprara, Washington University in St. Louis



Image POxy 1084, Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Tue, 04/24/2018 - 9:09am by Helen Cullyer.

The deadline for submitting individual abstracts and lightning talks is Wednesday April 25 at 11.59pm (EDT).  You can access the program submission system at:

https://program.classicalstudies.org/

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/23/2018 - 10:09am by Helen Cullyer.

Below is the complete programme of the KCL International Postgraduate Workshop "Lyric Beyond Lyric - 'Submerged' Traditions, Generic Interactions, and Later Receptions".

The programme can be found below as well as on our Facebook page (@Lyric-Beyond-Lyric) and on https://independent.academia.edu/LyricBeyondLyric2018 . 

The workshop will take place on 24 May 2018 at the Strand campus, King's College London (room S0.13). Our confirmed keynote speaker will be Prof Pauline LeVen (Yale University).

To attend the workshop, registration via Eventbrite is mandatory for all attendees (excluding confirmed speakers and respondents). The conference is free to attend and lunch and refreshments will be provided. The Eventbrite registration for the event will close at 8 pm on 11 May 2018.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 04/20/2018 - 8:30am by Erik Shell.

We are saddened to report the passing of Dr. Vincent J. Rosivach, SCS Life Member and very active member of CANE.

"His legacy in the humanities and the College of Arts and Sciences will continue, and students are encouraged to honor his legacy by continuing to foster their education and immerse themselves into the wonders of classical history and literature."

You can read his full obituary on the Fairfield Mirror here: http://fairfieldmirror.com/news/longtime-fairfield-professor-passes-away/

---

(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)   

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Thu, 04/19/2018 - 8:32am by Erik Shell.

A Day in the Life of A Classicist is a monthly column on the SCS blog, celebrating the working lives of classicists.

Nadya Williams is Associate Professor of History at the University of West Georgia.

As an academic who is also a homeschooling mom, crazy is the normal for me.  I am married to another academic, and thus we set our schedule together. To make sure that we have at least some time together as a family, we start the day with a family breakfast around 8 am. By 9 am, the 12-year-old starts his homeschooling day (he has a list of assignments to work through, and I check as needed), and I start the work day. Sometimes the toddler gets out his toy computer, and starts pounding on it in imitation of mama typing. Solidarity!

View full article. | Posted in on Wed, 04/18/2018 - 4:24pm by Ayelet Haimson Lushkov.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
In Memoriam
Remembering Antonia Syson (1973–2018)
SCS Announcements
Ruth Scodel, SCS delegate to the American Council of Learned Societies, has w

© 2018, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy