Letter on the Annual Meeting from Joseph Farrell

January 15, 2018

Dear Members,

Looking back on the recently concluded Annual Meeting, I’m of two minds. For those who took part, I think it was a big success. Newer-format events, like Career Networking and Ancient Maker Spaces, were really lively and well attended, especially by younger members. Georgia Nugent’s presidential panel on the PhD as a launching pad for careers other than college teaching was really inspiring. And the Program Committee’s special session on “Rhetoric: Then and Now” brought our professional responsibility to be political into the spotlight in a way that I feel was both fruitful and long overdue.

The success of these events is all the more impressive because every one of them underwent major changes at the last minute when key participants simply could not make it to Boston because of the weather. Amazingly few sessions were actually cancelled. But if you couldn’t get to Boston, it wasn’t a good convention for you. I’m very sorry for those whose travel plans were thwarted, and I’m extremely grateful to all those got there in spite of the extra effort, expense, and delay that it cost. Frankly, your success in doing so probably saved the convention from being a total disaster.

(Speaking of expense, Helen Cullyer and her staff are working with those who couldn’t get in to mitigate their financial exposure. Everyone affected has now received instructions on requesting refunds.)

Since this is the second Annual Meeting in four years to suffer the impact of extreme winter weather, many members are asking why we continue to meet in early January and in cities like Boston and Chicago. The question is important, and we have to take it seriously. Two events like this in just four years could be coincidental, but in view of all of the other extreme weather events in recent years, you would have to be a climate-change denier to think that this won’t happen again. So the issue is now top priority for the SCS Board of Directors, and I was happy to learn that Jodi Magness, the President of the AIA, is more than willing to work with us.

That said, just what to do is not obvious. Many members already wonder why we don’t meet more often in warm-weather cities, but even at this time of year we do not have our pick of venues; far from it. Next year, at least, we do have San Diego, and we can look forward to celebrating the Society’s Sesquicentennial in a warm climate. Still, another badly timed storm on the east coast or in the midwest might prevent many of us from arriving in time for the start of the conference. So, in addition to the question of where we meet, we also have to raise the question of when.

We have already signed contracts through 2024, and the time to identify venues for the years beyond that — while they are still available — is now. If we moved to a new time of year in 2025, we would have to avoid conflicts with CAMWS, CAAS, and the other Classical organizations, as well as with CAA, AAR-SBL, and other conventions that our members attend. Holidays and teaching schedules also come into play. It would not be easy. These are the reasons why we meet when we do, in the first place, and it is not impossible that we will continue to do so, although something has to be done to mitigate the risk of another Bomb Cyclone or Polar Vortex. Disruptions like that are bad for our members — especially younger members, those with families, those who have no access to research and travel funds, and so on — and they threaten the Society’s financial health while taxing our professional staff, who worked heroically to keep the most recent convention on track, and who are still dealing with a vastly more complicated aftermath than they expected. Thanks to them, as well as to all of you who made it to Boston in spite of everything, the convention was, against the odds, a success, intellectually and socially. And I promise that we will do everything possible to ensure that future events will be even more successful, and that the risk of weather-related disruption will be as small as possible.

Sincerely,

Joseph Farrell

SCS President, 2018

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Dura-Europos: Past, Present, Future - Celebrating the Centennial of Excavations at Dura-Europos

Sponsored by: Yale University’s interdisciplinary ARCHAIA Program for the Study of Ancient and Premodern Cultures and Societies

Dates : March 31, 2022 - April 2, 2022

Where: Hybrid/Virtual [livestream]

Yale University’s interdisciplinary ARCHAIA program is pleased to share news of its upcoming hybrid conference: Dura-Europos: Past, Present, Future. This three-day event (March 31-April 2, 2022) is arranged to celebrate the centennial of excavations on-site at Dura-Europos (Syria). Papers and discussion will explore the town’s regional and long-distance ties in antiquity, 21st-century geopolitical entanglements, and avenues for future research. Registration is free, and online attendance is open to all. 

For information about the papers and presenters, and to register, please see: 

https://campuspress.yale.edu/duraeuropos2022/

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 03/08/2022 - 11:55am by .

CAAS ARC Workshop: Diversity Policies are for Everyone

When: Saturday, March 19, 2022 - 11:00AM EDT

Where: Virtual (via Zoom)

The Antiracism Committee (ARC) of The Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS) is organizing another workshop on diversity policies. Through a series of case studies, this workshop will explore ways to create and improve on diversity policies so that they can be more helpful to BIPOC students and scholars. We’ll be meeting on Saturday, March 19, 2022 at 11am EDT via Zoom. This workshop is free and open to anyone who registers.

If you’d like to register, you can fill out this form:  https://forms.gle/C5KMYK7nB3FQRVXr8

If you have any questions about the workshop, please email David Wright: djwrig85@gmail.com. See also attached flyer and share widely! Hope to see you there!

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Mon, 03/07/2022 - 3:04pm by .

Call for Proposals: CAAS 2022 Annual Meeting

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States

Dates: October 6-8, 2022

Venue: HOTEL DU PONT, Wilmington, DE

Deadline for all proposals (individual papers, panels, workshops): (extended) Monday, March 28, 2022

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Mon, 03/07/2022 - 12:34pm by .

The Classics Program at Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY), advertises its graduate programs in Latin education. These programs combine courses and mentoring in the vibrant environs of New York City. They aim to foster the ability to make Latin compelling to a diverse population of middle and high school students. Both programs lead to certification in New York State. Applications are accepted in both the Fall and the Spring. The deadline for applications to start in Fall 2022 is March 15th, 2022, but consideration may be made for later applications. 

  1. MA in Adolescent Education, Grades 7-12 – Latin

A 49 to 50-credit course sequence in Latin, Classics, and Education that prepares students to teach Latin in grades 7-12. This program is run jointly by the Classics Program in the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Education.

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Fri, 03/04/2022 - 4:49pm by .

When you are standing at the edge of the Pontic steppe, where the Bug-Dnieper estuary melts into the Black Sea, there are three islands on the horizon. It can be difficult to see in the haze of late summer, which is when I was there last with two friends, Sam Holzman and Phil Katz.

Foremost is Berezan, once connected to the adjacent mainland. Long and flat-topped like a container ship, the largest of the handful of islands to rise from the Black Sea. It was settled by Ionians in the sixth century BCE, and has been all-but-continuously excavated since 1894.

A second island is artificial: across from the mainland town of Ochakiv lies the fortress isle of Pervomaisky. The Ottomans used the citadel at Ochakiv to control access to the river until it fell to John Paul Jones in service of the Empress Catherine in 1788. Pervomaisky was built up from a sandbar and fortified by Russia in the late nineteenth century. Both permanently blocked off the Dnieper as an invasion or slaving route to the forest steppe.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 03/03/2022 - 12:00pm by .

International Conferences of Novelty in Classics

1st ICoNiC: Audience Response in Ancient Greek and Latin Literature: Concepts, Contexts, Conflicts - Multiple Approaches to Author-Audience Relationship

02-03 September 2022 (virtual via MS Teams)

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 8:30am by .

Between 6pm GMT on 31 May 2022 and the following evening, 1 June 2022, the Herodotus Helpline will be hosting the Herodotus Marathon. This is a non-stop, multilingual reading of Herodotus’ Histories. We are calling it the Marathon because we anticipate that it will take a little over 26 hours. Non-stop. Different readers will read their sections of the Histories via zoom, but it will be broadcast live (and recorded for posterity) on youtube. Readers will read in their native languages (or in ancient Greek, if they prefer).

To reflect Herodotus’ huge reach, we are looking for readers from the widest possible range of backgrounds (and the widest possible range of native tongues). Readers will include: scholars and students of Herodotus, celebrities with an interest or background in antiquity, or members of the general public with an interest in the ancient world - all are welcome!

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 8:04am by .

Interdisciplinary Humanities 

Fall/Winter 2022 issue: Myth and Art

Deadline for Submissions: March 31, 2022

Guest Editors: Edmund Cueva and Anna Tahinci

[Journal published by parent organization - HERA (Humanities Education and Research Association) at UTEP (University of Texas at El Paso)]

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Tue, 02/22/2022 - 7:41am by .
NEH seal

The Hill School and Valencia College invite applications to the NEH Institute, Timeless Parallels: Veteran Voices and Classical Literature

Eligibility:

This program is open to all secondary school teachers of Latin, Ancient Greek, English, or History.

Program Description:

This Institute will enable secondary school teachers to develop curriculum that draws parallels between the experience of veterans in the modern and ancient worlds, exploring such issues as homecoming and reintegration into civilian life; the treatment of veterans; the problem of war trauma and treatment of PTSD; and, the role of society in sharing the burdens of veteran experiences.

Program Costs:

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Sun, 02/20/2022 - 8:47pm by Helen Cullyer.
Eta Sigma Phi owl logo

Eta Sigma Phi has extended the deadline for all three of its 2022 Summer Travel Scholarships to March 1:

The Theodore Bedrick Scholarship provides funding for a Vergilian Society Tour in Italy: https://www.etasigmaphi.org/scholarships/summer-travel/bedrick/

The Brent Malcolm Froberg Scholarship provides funding for the Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens: https://www.etasigmaphi.org/scholarships/summer-travel/ascsa/

The America Academy in Rome scholarship provides funding for the AAR's Classical Summer School: https://www.etasigmaphi.org/scholarships/summer-travel/aar/

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Sun, 02/20/2022 - 6:38pm by Helen Cullyer.

Pages

Latest Stories

SCS Announcements
SCS Announcements
Symposium Cumanum – Call for Proposal
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
JOIN TAPA FOR A VIRTUAL OPEN

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy