Letter from President Mary T. Boatwright

As some of you witnessed personally and all can now read (see, e.g., The Chronicle), the 150th Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies last weekend in San Diego was disgraced by two shocking incidents. One occurred when an independent scholar attending a panel told Princeton Assistant Professor Dan-el Padilla Peralta that he got his job because he is black. The SCS, after consulting internally and in accordance with our annual meeting harassment policy, notified the scholar that she should no longer attend SCS sessions and events in San Diego. In the other incident, the founders of the Sportula, two students of color, were questioned by a hotel staff member about their presence at the conference. We are in contact with the Marriott. We have reached out to the students to express our support. We also understand that the Marriott has contacted them to better understand their experience and apologize.

But these and other immediate responses, such as the Board statement the SCS passed on the meeting’s last day, by themselves can do little to redress the real and deep-seated problems the incidents disclose about not only US society but also about our field. The events reveal fears, resentments, and anger among our members. Dan-el Padilla Peralta makes the case on Medium that our field “lacks the courage to acknowledge its historical and ongoing inability to value scholars from underrepresented groups.” Other colleagues also express despair at the incidents, which resonate with micro-aggressions, and worse, that they themselves have experienced.

We must confront, meet, and remedy the problems so appallingly revealed in San Diego. It is more than ironic that the accusation of preferential job treatment on the basis of race was made at a special Sesquicentennial panel on “The Future of Classics,” and that the two students representing Sportula had received awards from WCC and LCC for advancing equality and diversity. The future of our discipline depends on expansion and inclusion. Just as importantly, the integrity and value of the Society and of all classicists are inseparable from equity and respect for everyone.

The SCS has been working consciously towards expansion and inclusion since the 1970s, if not before, through changes such as anonymous submissions for the program, the creation of committees to safeguard the rights and promote the interests of specific groups of our members, and the establishment of policies against harassment. There is obviously very much more to be done. I am working with the SCS Past President (2018) and President Elect (2020) Joseph Farrell and Sheila Murnaghan, with the SCS Executive Director Dr. Helen Cullyer, and with the Board of Directors. But everyone must work together and we must listen to one another honestly and openly, for the SCS and our discipline to move forward. In the meantime, we deeply regret the insulting events that occurred at the 2019 SCS annual meeting, and we recommit to effecting change in the field.

Sincerely,  

Mary T. Boatwright, President of the SCS, 2019

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We are pleased to announce that a special issue of EPEKEINA (International Journal of Ontology. History and Critics) dealing with the Roman conception of time and cultural history is now available at:

http://www.ricercafilosofica.it/epekeina/index.php/epekeina

The title chosen for the whole volume is “Evil, Progress, and Fall: Moral Readings of Time and Cultural Development in Roman Literature and Philosophy”, since most of the contributions pertain to the Section “Latin Philosophy and Culture”, edited by Rosa Rita Marchese and Fabio Tutrone. However, this issue also hosts thematically different sections, such as the Proceedings of a conference on Latin Platonism recently held in Cardiff. Articles are in English, Italian and German, and can be dowloaded as PDF files.

For more information, please do not hesitate to contact either Fabio Tutrone (fabio.tutrone@unipa.it) or Rosa Rita Marchese (ritamarchese@neomedia.it)

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 10/28/2014 - 7:10pm by Adam Blistein.

Aquila Theatre’s Youstories & the Center for Ancient Studies at NYU Present Warstories: Ancient And Modern Narratives Of War on Tuesday, November 11th, Veteran’s Day, 2014.  The program for the event is as follows:

Metropolitan Museum of Art – 1000 5th Avenue, 11 am-12 pm
11:00 am Gallery Talk: Stories of War and Homecoming in Classical Drama and Art,

Hemmerdinger Hall, 31 Washington Place – NYU, 1 pm-9 pm
1:00 pm  - “A Presentation of Veteran Artworks,” Society of Artistic Veterans

5:30 pm – “Welcome,” Matthew S. Santirocco, Senior Vice Provost, Professor of Classics and Angelo J. Ranieri Director of Ancient Studies and Peter Meineck, Clinical Associate Professor of Classics, NYU

“Opening Address: Telling Who We Are,” Kwame Anthony Appiah, Professor of Philosophy and Law, NYU

Aquila Theatre Presents scenes from “A Female Philoctetes” Based on Sophocles

“Response, ” Nancy Sherman, University Professor of Philosophy, Georgetown University

Audience Discussion, Moderated by Nancy Sherman and Peter Meineck

Reception

For more information, contact aquila@aquilatheatre.com or (914) 401-9494.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Tue, 10/28/2014 - 5:37pm by Adam Blistein.
Click here to read about a special event taking place at the annual meeting on Thursday evening January 8:  a performance of Anne Carson's Antigonick directed by the author.
View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 10/28/2014 - 5:17pm by Adam Blistein.

From ASU News: "Libraries have always bridged past and present, preserving and innovating. To lead ASU’s libraries in a transformative time, Arizona State University has today named James J. O’Donnell, former Georgetown provost, classicist and pioneer in emerging digital technologies, to the post of university librarian. O’Donnell will fill the position vacated by Sherrie Schmidt, who retired as university librarian on June 30, after 20 years of leadership. O’Donnell will also be a professor in the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. His appointment takes effect Feb. 3, 2015."

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Tue, 10/28/2014 - 9:59am by Information Architect.
Click here to read about air and train travel to New Orleans as well as transportation between the meeting hotels and Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.
View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/22/2014 - 10:51am by Adam Blistein.

Every year the Women’s Classical Caucus presents three awards, recognizing excellence in the following categories:

   1. an article (book chapter, etc.) published in the three calendar years prior to the nominating year given in honor of Barbara McManus: $250

   2. an oral paper presented at a major conference in the year prior to 30 June of the nominating year by a pre-Ph.D. scholar (ca. 20 minutes in length as delivered): $150

   3. an oral paper presented at a major conference in the year prior to 30 June of the nominating year by a post-Ph.D. scholar (ca. 20 minutes in length as delivered): $150

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 10/20/2014 - 3:01pm by Adam Blistein.

Each year, the Rome Prize is awarded to about thirty emerging artists and scholars who represent the highest standard of excellence and who are in the early or middle stages of their working lives. The deadline for the nation-wide Rome Prize competition is 1 November 2014.  Applications will also be accepted between 2-15 November 2014 for an additional fee.

Fellows are chosen from the following disciplines:

  • Architecture
  • Design
  • Historic Preservation and Conservation
  • Landscape Architecture
  • Literature (awarded only by nomination through the American Academy of Arts and Letters)
  • Music Composition
  • Visual Arts
  • Ancient Studies
  • Medieval Studies
  • Renaissance and Early Modern Studies
  • Modern Italian Studies

Rome Prize recipients are generally invited to Rome for eleven months (some design fellowships are six months and some pre-doctoral art history fellowships are two years).

The Rome Prize consists of room and board, a stipend and separate work space, and privileged access to Rome.  Rome Prize winners are the core of the Academy's residential community, which also includes Affiliated Fellows, Residents and Visiting Artists and Visiting Scholars.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 10/13/2014 - 4:08pm by Adam Blistein.

Anchoring Innovation is the new research agenda of OIKOS, the National Research School in Classical Studies in the Netherlands. This agenda was developed with the financial support of Leiden University, Radboud University Nijmegen, University of Amsterdam and University of Groningen. It looks at innovation processes in various domains, including politics, religion, architecture, literature, linguistics and technology, in classical antiquity. The concept of “anchoring” refers to the many different ways in which people connect new developments and initiatives in these domains with the old, the familiar and traditional. Discourse-cohesion, intertextuality, memory studies, architectural transitions can be considered examples of ‘anchoring innovation’. To help us implement this research agenda we are currently looking for 4 PhD students and 4 postdocs:

Radboud University Nijmegen 1 PhD candidate Greek / Latin
1 PhD candidate Ancient History / Classical Archaeology 1 Postdoc Latin, 1.0 fte, 3 years
1 Postdoc Roman Archaeology, 1.0 fte, 3 years

University of Groningen
1 Postdoc Greek / Latin, 1.0 fte, 3 years
1 Postdoc Ancient History, 1.0 fte, 3 years

Leiden University
1 PhD candidate Latin

University of Amsterdam
1 PhD candidate Greek

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Mon, 10/13/2014 - 12:59pm by Adam Blistein.

‘Myths of the Mediterranean’ is an international conference at the Musée d’Art Classique de Mougins (Cannes, France), November 29–30, 2014, organized by Fabian Meinel & Katia Schoerle.  It aims to provide a broad perspective on the place and function of myth in Graeco-Roman antiquity and beyond, focusing in particular on transfers and transformations of myth as a tool to negotiate crucial sociocultural questions. The conference is targeted at both academic and lay audiences.

The conference will begin with the place of myth in Homer. After a look at the dissemination of myth across the ancient Mediterranean and its role in classical Athens, it will inquire about the transformations of myth in Rome and, fast-forwarding, the 19th and 20th century. Classical myth found particular resonance in different modern contexts such as fin-de-siècle Vienna and post-war France, which used myth for their own political agendas. The concluding section brings in a different, and entirely contemporary, perspective, looking at ‘myths’ in current perceptions of Mediterranean societies.

The conference programme is available at www.mouginsmusee.com/news/2014/09/myths-of-the-mediterranean

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 10/08/2014 - 4:04pm by Adam Blistein.

The Société Internationale de Bibliographie Classique (SIBC), the not-for-profit organization that oversees the publication of L’Année, has reorganized. Rather than giving one office editorial control over the others, all offices will now have editorial control over the content that they produce. SIBC will also form an editorial board to oversee the production of each volume, with an editor to ensure consistency and quality control. Dr. Lisa Carson, Director of the American Office of L’Année, will be the SCS representative on the editorial board.

The French Office of L’Année is changing.  CNRS has withdrawn from the project, and the University of Lille (3) will establish a new one beginning in 2015.

L'Année philologique on the Internet now covers 87 years of classical bibliography with volumes 1 (1924-1926) to 83 (2012).  As of the end of July 2014, 17,000 records from volume 83 (2012) had been posted online.  Because of the withdrawal of CNRS from the project, publications from France and other countries for which the French Office is responsible are momentarily not included.  However, both SIBC and the new French Office at the University of Lille will strive to deal with any backlog in indexing as quickly as possible. 

The online version of L’Année has the following new features:

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/08/2014 - 4:00pm by Adam Blistein.

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