In Memoriam Barbara F. McManus

I am very sorry to report that Barbara F. McManus died this morning after a long and very brave battle with cancer.  Professor McManus received her B.A. from the College of New Rochelle, summa cum laude, in 1964 and her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Harvard in 1975.  She began teaching at the College of New Rochelle as an Instructor in 1967 and remained there until she retired from the post of Professor of Classics in 2000.  She produced outstanding scholarship and created innovative courses in classics and women’s studies and was a leader in developing online resources for the field, most notably the VRoma project.

While I hope to publish a more detailed memorial notice in the future, I want to express my immediate regret that the Society has lost a member who served it so long and so well.  Professor McManus was a member and chair of multiple committees.  She was elected an at large member of the Board of Directors (1994-1997) and Vice President for Professional Matters (2001-2005).  As Vice President she led the effort to create our census of classics department staffing and enrollments, personally updated our list of departments where classics is taught, and persuaded those departments to respond to the first iteration of that census (covering the 2003-2004 academic year).  About 60% of the departments on our list ultimately did complete the census, and in subsequent years the Society was not able to achieve that level of participation until the most recent iteration when we hired the University of Chicago’s Survey Lab to carry out this project.  For all of this effort Professor McManus received our Distinguished Service Award in 2009, and the picture below shows her receiving that award from Kurt Raaflaub, then President of the Society, at the annual meeting in that year. 

Working with Barbara McManus was one of the highlights of my experience as Executive Director of the Society.  I will miss her a great deal.

Adam D. Blistein
June 19, 2015

Update July 1, 2015:  The Classical Association of the Atlantic States has posted this comprehensive memorial notice

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Audiences are invited to get intimate with the action in the second instalment of a fresh take on Camus' 'Caligula.'

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:25am by Information Architect.

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View full article. | Posted in Member News on Wed, 05/04/2011 - 12:21am by .

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View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 05/02/2011 - 3:28am by Information Architect.

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The American Philological Association seeks to appoint an Editor for Monographs for a term of four years, to begin with the January 2012 meetings in Philadelphia.  We seek a senior scholar with editorial experience and an interest in shaping outstanding work for publication in a distinguished series.  The editor reviews proposals and manuscripts, works with authors to bring manuscripts to final form, and is the Association's contact with the publisher through the process.  While we continue our relationship with Oxford University Press, we particularly seek an editor willing to explore alternate and innovative forms of publication for appropriate scholarly works. Candidates should submit, and nominees will be invited to submit, a current c.v. and a brief statement outlining their interest. Applications and nominations may be submitted in confidence to the Vice President for Publications at provost@georgetown.edu. Consideration of candidates, who must be members of the APA in good standing, will begin on or after June 1, 2011. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 7:14pm by .

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View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/28/2011 - 1:54am by .

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