In memoriam: Charles L. Babcock (1924-2012)

Charles Luther Babcock died December 7, 2012 at the age of 88. He was born in Whittier California, May 26, 1924. After attending Whittier Union High School, he enrolled in the University of California—Berkeley in 1941, where he became a member of ROTC. In 1943 he entered the US Army and served in General Patton’s Third Army in the invasion of Germany in 1945. There, as Second Lieutenant, he earned the Bronze Medal for leading his platoon through heavy fire at Neumarkt, assisting the wounded, personally liberating nine POWs and capturing the local civilian leader of the resistance. After the war as Captain he became aide-de-camp to Maj. Gen. John Coulter, who went on to become Deputy Commander of the Fourth Army.

In 1947 Capt. Babcock resumed his studies at Berkeley, where he earned a BA (Phi Beta Kappa) in Latin in 1948 and a PhD in Classics in 1953, with a dissertation on The Dating of the Capitoline Fasti and the Erasure of the Antonii Names, written under Arthur E. Gordon. So began Charles Babcock’s lifelong interest in Latin Epigraphy and the history of the Roman Empire. He continued his pursuit of Roman history and epigraphy at the American Academy in Rome as a Fulbright Scholar and Academy Fellow (1953-55). While sailing to Rome with other Americans heading for the Academy, he met Mary A. Taylor, a graduate student from Bryn Mawr. They were married in 1955 and raised three children.

After two years as Instructor at Cornell University (1955-57), Charles became Assistant Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, where he remained for nine years (1957-66), being promoted to Associate Professor in 1962. At Penn he discovered his talent for administration, serving in due course as Assistant Dean, Vice-Dean, and Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

He came to The Ohio State University as Professor of Classics and Chair of the department in 1966. In 1968 when the arts and sciences were reorganized into five separate colleges, Charles became the first Dean of the College of Humanities. After one term as dean he returned to teaching, specializing in Latin Epigraphy and literature, especially Horace and Tacitus, while Horace and Augustan Rome became the focus of his papers and publications.

From 1980-88 he served as Chair of the Department of Classics. In 1986 he and his colleague, Stephen Tracy, established a research center for the study of Greek and Latin inscriptions. Subsequently expanded to include paleography, the Center for Epigraphical and Palaeographical Studies, is now the only comprehensive research facility for the study of Greek and Latin inscriptions and manuscripts in the United States.  

At Ohio State Charles  won numerous awards:  the Alfred J. Wright Award "for significant service to organized student activities and for the development of effective student leadership" (1968); The Alumni Distinguished Teaching Award (1982), the first Exemplary Faculty Award in the College of Humanities (1989); and the Distinguished Service Award (1996).          

Charles was also active in many national and regional classical associations. He was Director of the American Philological Association (1968-72); Executive Committee Member (1970-74), President-Elect (1976-77) and President (1977-78) of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South; and Trustee (1967-70), which  awarded him the OVATIO Award of Merit in 1982. He also served as Vice-President (1971-72) and President (1972-73) of the Vergilian Society.

Ever since his original residency at American Academy in Rome Charles maintained a lively interest in that institution. In 1966 he was Professor-in-Charge of the Summer School. In 1986 he was a resident in Classical Studies, and in 1988-89 became Acting Mellon Professor-in-Charge. He also participated in the administration of the Academy. He served as Trustee (1981-83), chaired the Friends of the Library (1985-86), and, after serving as Mellon Professor, chaired the Advisory Council to the School of Classical Studies (1992-94).

Charles was equally involved with the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, familiarly known as the “Centro.”  The Centro was established in 1965 at the instigation of Brooks Otis to provide a study-abroad experience for undergraduates. Charles, with an interest in the project from its inception, became Professor-in-Charge in 1974-75 and then served as Chair of the Managing Committee for the next seven years (1975-82). He continued to recruit students for both the Centro and the American Academy throughout his career and long into retirement.

After retirement in 1992 Charles continued to serve the Ohio State University in various capacities.  The Thompson Memorial Library held a special place in his heart. During the critical time of raising money for its renovation, he co-chaired Campus Campaign, the annual fundraising effort of the university, for two years (2001-02), and then served as President of the Board of Directors of the Friends of the Library. He saw his efforts on behalf of the library rewarded with the completion of the $120 million renovation in 2009.


For information on the memorial service, go to http://classics.osu.edu/events/memorial-service-emeritus-professor-charles-luther-babcock.

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Arheologia is a research journal of the Institute of Archaeology, the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine discussing problems of archaeology. The journal presents articles on ancient history and archaeology from prehistory till the Early Modern period, publications of new materials and research results regarding the sites situated on the territory of Ukraine and beyond, biographic materials, reviews and chronicles. The journal’s audience are historians, local lore researchers, teachers, students of historical departments, general public interested in the ancient history of Ukraine.

Arheologia is asking for direct support in the form of scholarship. The executive editor, Dr. Tetiania Shevchenko, has put out a call requesting non-Ukrainian submissions to the journal. The journal is open access (no publication fees) and accepts submissions in English. There's already a range of Classics relevant articles published in the journal, so additional relevant research in Classics is welcome.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 11:20am by .
Books

New Directions in the Study of Women in the Greco-Roman World

Book Launch to Celebrate the Book and its dedicatee, Sarah B. Pomeroy

When: Monday, April 4, 2022, 1:00pm-2:30pm EDT

Where: Zoom (email Ronnie Ancona for information: rancona@hunter.cuny.edu)

Sarah Pomeroy’s groundbreaking Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves introduced scholars, students, and general readers to an exciting new area of inquiry: women in classical antiquity. Almost fifty years later, New Directions in the Study of Women in the Greco-Roman World builds upon and moves beyond Pomeroy’s seminal work to represent the next step in this interdisciplinary field.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Wed, 03/30/2022 - 10:41am by .

(posted on behalf of Jakub Pigoń with details from Ukrainian Wikipedia entry)

Oleksandr Kyslyuk, a historian and classicist, was born in 1962. He graduated from Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv and was active as a language teacher (including ancient Greek) and, in particular, as a translator from Greek, Latin and other languages at the Kyiv Theological Academy and Seminary of the UOC-KP (1993-2005). Most recently, he was a senior lecturer at the Department of Theory and History of State and Law of the Institute of Political Science and Law of the National Pedagogical University MP Dragomanova, where he conducted classes in Latin and Roman law. Aristotle's Politics, Xenophon's Anabasis and a treatise by Thomas of Aquinas were among the works he rendered into Ukrainian. He died on March 5, 2022 in Bucha near Kyiv.

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Tue, 03/29/2022 - 1:16pm by .
University of British Columbia - AMNE department

The Department of Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies celebrates its new identity

Questioning and building upon what has come before

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 03/29/2022 - 10:14am by .
Roman Forum

This course in Italy will focus on creating antiracist curricula in the Latin classroom and will take place from July 18th - July 29th in Rome and the Bay of Naples. The course includes visits to many of the major sites in Rome and the Bay of Naples in afternoons or on full-day excursions. The Vergilian Society has scholarships available and the deadline to apply has been extended to April 11th. These scholarships often cover the entire tour apart from the flight.

This tour is intended as a collaborative experience where extensive resources will be shared, everyone's voice is welcome, and participants work as a group to envision a better model for the field at the PK-12 level.

More details can be found here: https://www.vergiliansociety.org/diversifying-the-latin.../

View full article. | Posted in Summer Programs on Thu, 03/24/2022 - 11:33am by Helen Cullyer.
Fortunatae Journal Cover in yellow

Fortunatae, Revista Canaria de Filología, Cultura y Humanidades Clásicas, is edited by the Classical Studies Section of the Classical, French, Arabic and Romance Philology Department at Universidad de La Laguna (Tenerife, Spain).

Since its origins in 1991, the Journal publishes original, new research papers, notes and reviews, written by National and International contributors. Its scope is ample, focusing on diverse literary manifestations, new perspectives, subjects and theories originated in the field of classical studies and its continuity in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Past issues of Fortunatae edited up to date show a periodical and prestigious publishing line, not only by the quality and originality of some of its contributions, but also by the bibliographical repertoire followed in the field of research to which it pertains. Published twice-a-year since 2019, Fortunatae accepts papers, being June and December the publication dates respectively.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 03/24/2022 - 8:21am by Helen Cullyer.
A man in a light blue toga hugs a woman with black hair, seen only from the back, who buries her head in his shoulder and raises her left hand in lament.

I have always enjoyed Latin class because it felt like a puzzle, much like math. Find the verb, find the noun that matches with the right case, number, and gender, then piece it all together. I had never connected with the language beyond its algebraic nature until my teacher gave me the opportunity to take ownership over the material — with a self-directed research assignment to be presented at a colloquium. Completing this project during a period of remote learning, I felt inspired by the ability to have greater independence and take control of my own learning. On top of all that, we would be presenting our work to the entire school and the wider community at the end of the year.

But first, I needed to choose what I wanted to study.

View full article. | Posted in on Mon, 03/21/2022 - 10:31am by .
A hand-drawn map on yellowed parchment with drawings of buildings and an aqueduct. In the center, a togaed man sits on a throne with a spear in his right hand and a halo behind him, indicating his sainthood. Red text behind his head reads ANTIOCHIA.

Research ideas often develop out of chance encounters or unplanned circumstances. My dissertation project was born just like that: when the intersection between an author that I was falling in love with and a pressing question that emerged from a completely unrelated event started bugging my young researcher’s mind.

I completed my M.A. by producing a translation, with commentary, of the letters of Libanius of Antioch to Datianus. A Greek sophist under the Roman empire, Libanius held the chair of rhetoric in Antioch for the greater part of the second half of the 4th century CE. His immense production, often mined for its wealth of historical information, has been the object of a resurgence of interest in the past few decades. I started working on his epistolary corpus only a few years after the publication of a precious volume that collected the state of the art in Libanian scholarship. A teacher myself and forced to maintain long-distance relationships with friends and family in my home country, I felt in familiar territory making the acquaintance of this ancient teacher, who gracefully preserved copies of some 1500 letters he sent to friends, students’ parents, bureaucrats, politicians, governors, and emperors of his time. 

View full article. | Posted in on Fri, 03/18/2022 - 10:24am by .

Seneca 2022 --- SPECIAL/FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS 

Deadline for proposals: March 30, 2022

The Centre for Classical Studies of the School of Arts and Humanities of the University of Lisbon is organizing an International Conference on Seneca to promote and encourage a critical reflection on the permanence of themes, values, perspectives and representations of Seneca’s works in Western literature and culture. 

The Conference will take place between 17-20 October 2022, and, through the interdisciplinary debate of the contribution given by the experiences of researchers from different fields of study, it aims to:

- determine how Seneca became one of the most prominent figures in Western culture;

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 03/17/2022 - 10:14am by .

(From the Classics Department at Emory University)

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Wed, 03/16/2022 - 3:10pm by .

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