In Memoriam: Eleanor Jane Goltz Huzar (Granger)

(Written by Ward Briggs)

Eleanor Jane Goltz Huzar (Granger) was born on June 15, 1922, in St. Paul, Minnesota to a physician, Dr. Edward Victor Goltz, and his wife, Claire O’Neill Goltz. Raised in a family of doctors, Eleanor had every intention of becoming a doctor herself, but found “I had no talent for it,” and instead pursued her love of Roman history at the University of Minnesota (A.B., 1943) and later at Cornell (M.A. 1945; Ph.D., 1948). Her dissertation focused on the political, economic, and religious relations between the Roman Republic and Ptolemaic Egypt and she pursued the subject in a series of articles in CJ and later in a well-received biography of Marc Antony (1978), which Erich Gruen called “the best biography of Antony available in English.” She received the Prix de Rome of the AAR for 1978-80 and continued to travel in Europe during the summers. She contributed a number of deeply researched and authoritative articles on early emperors and, of course, Egypt for the encyclopedic Festschrift, Aufstieg und Niedergang der Römischen Welt.

Though she was a scrupulous researcher, her real love was teaching. After taking a succession of short-term positions, at Stanford (1948-50), the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (1951-5), Southeast Missouri State University (1955-9), and Carleton College (1959-60), she arrived at Michigan State in 1960 as the first full-time ancient historian and only the second woman on the faculty. She chaired the program in Classical Studies (1965-90). The university was primarily focused on teaching in those days, and Eleanor pitched in. She regularly taught the large (300-500 students) freshman survey course on world history from antiquity into the Middle Ages as well as intermediate reading courses and graduate courses, one year on Greece, the next on Rome. She chaired the Classical Studies Committee, which was a cooperative effort between classics, history, philosophy, and other programs. She regularly took her sabbaticals at the American Academy in Rome, whence she traveled widely around the Mediterranean lands that had previously been known to her only through books: “Egypt was one of the places that was still startling to me because it was so much simpler than the European pictures that we’d been seeing regularly. The mixed religion and the magnificent antiquities,…nothing else is comparable.”

Her service was not limited to MSU. She was a member of the selection committee for the National Endowment for Humanities (1979-84) and the Council for International Exchange Scholars, Washington (1979-81). She was President of CAMWS (1984-5), served on the advisory council of the for 30 years (1963-92) and the executive committee (1970-3, 1988-92). She also served on the managing committee of the ASCSA (1964-92).

On 21 June 1950 she married Elias Huzar, who died in December of that year. On October 11, 1991, she married Bruce I. Granger, who died in 2009. Eleanor herself died on May 7, 2018, in Golden Valley, MN.

---

(Photos: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0; "Eleanor Huzar" by Carleton College, used with permission)

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David C. Young, Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Florida (http://web.classics.ufl.edu/faculty/faculty_o/young.html), died February 5, 2013. An internationally recognized scholar of Pindar and a pioneer in the history of the Olympic games, David was recognized with a Lifetime Distinguished Scholar Award in 2007 by the International Society of Olympic Historians. He taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara (1963-1989) and was a visiting professor at Stanford (1974, 1976) and the University of Michigan (1973, 1983) before joining the faculty at the University of Florida where he was a beloved teacher who inspired students for twenty years.

The Department of Classics at the University of Florida will post information here http://web.classics.ufl.edu/index.html regarding a memorial service to be held in his honor in Gainesville, FL. Please do not hesitate to contact us if we may assist you to attend.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 02/07/2013 - 4:01pm by Adam Blistein.

As noted earlier, Craig Gibson has been appointed Editor of Transactions effective January 5, 2014.  However, he will handle new submissions effective immediately.  Please send all submissions electronically to tapa@uiowa.edu, following TAPA guidelines.  Katharina Volk will remain the official Editor through 2013 and in charge of producing this year's issues (143.1 and 2).

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 02/03/2013 - 4:07pm by Adam Blistein.

As Chair of the Search Committee, I am happy to report that Professor Craig Gibson of the University of Iowa has accepted our invitation to become the next Editor of the Transactions of the American Philological Association.  Professor Gibson is a distinguished and very productive scholar of ancient literature and its intersections with other aspects of ancient culture.  His term as Editor will run from January 5, 2014 to January 7, 2018.  An announcement concerning the transition of responsibility from current Editor Katharina Volk to Professor Gibson and protocol for submission of manuscripts will soon be published on the web site and in the Association Newsletter.

I want to thank the other members of the Search Committee (John Bodel, Jeff Henderson, Chris Kraus, and Adam Blistein) for their assistance in the completion of this successful search.  I also very much appreciate the interest that the Committee saw from the other highly qualified candidates for this position.  Finally, we are grateful to Department of Classics of the University of Iowa for its support of the arrangements necessary to enable Professor Gibson to accept this position. 

Michael Gagarin
Vice President for Publications and Research

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/29/2013 - 7:48pm by Adam Blistein.

After three weeks, the 144th Annual Meeting in Seattle is receding into history, and it is a good moment to take stock of what a successful meeting it proved to be.  The host department from UW-Seattle, led by Ruby Blondell and Alain Gowing, did a superb job, and we thank them all for helping to make the Meeting such a success.  Even the Northwest weather cooperated to make Seattle a great venue for us: on my fourth visit to Seattle I finally got to see Mt. Rainier.  There was a tremendous program of panels and performances, even if your officers, including the President, were unable to emerge from their seclusion in committee rooms to enjoy more than a small fraction of the riches on offer.

In the Plenary Session, we honored a remarkable group of teachers and scholars for their achievements. From the point of view of our Association’s history and future, the most significant moment in the Plenary Session was the celebration of the triumphant conclusion of the Gateway Campaign, steered to its harbor by President Jeffrey Henderson.  It was a delight to see the Campaign Committee members being honored, and to see Distinguished Service Awards presented to the three visionary and energetic APA members who provided such outstanding leadership from the beginning to the end of the Campaign: Ward W. Briggs, David H. Porter, and Michael C.J. Putnam.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 01/29/2013 - 7:46pm by Adam Blistein.

"Tools of the Trade" was conceived by Lowell Edmunds as a bibliographic guide for graduate students and others interested in furthering their knowledge of the Roman world. When the expansion of scholarly resources and the growing capabilities of web-based publication made a second edition desirable, Professor Edmunds decided to divide the project into thirteen discrete bibliographies, each with its own editor/compiler.At this point, the project was passed on to Sander M. Goldberg of UCLA, who has assumed responsibility for editing the final documents and posting them on this site. The content and form of each bibliography has been determined by the subject editor, who is identified in the heading for each document.

Download "Tools of the Trade".

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sat, 01/12/2013 - 1:02pm by .

A short conference organised by the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh, UK.

Date:  Friday 15th-Saturday 16th March, 2012

The starting point for this conference is the lively and controversial figure of Caesarius, bishop of Arles from 502-542. Both Caesarius and the time in which he lived have been seen as emblematic of the cusp between the ancient and medieval eras. This conference brings together scholars from diverse backgrounds in order to throw light on this fascinating figure, an eventful period of late antique history, and the rich material culture of southern Gaul.

Friday 15th March Opening Lecture, 5pm

William Klingshirn (Catholic University of America): ‘Caesarius of Arles: 1970-2042: retrospect and prospect’

Saturday 16th March Day Conference (9am-6pm)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 01/10/2013 - 2:08pm by .

Local newspapers published articles about the two winners of this year's Precollegiate Teaching Award.  The Seattle Times published this story about Nora Macdonald just before the annual meeting in that city.  The Delaware County Daily Times carried an article about Lee T. Pearcy.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 6:43pm by Adam Blistein.

Dear APA Friends:

I have learned from close colleagues in my field of Hellenistic poetry at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki of the dire situation of their resources: they have no funds whatever to buy books for their library. For one of the prominent European departments in Classics, this is a truly difficult situation: senior professors and young scholars alike are deprived of access to the most recent scholarship and bibliographies, namely our newly published books. The situation is particularly hard on the graduate students, of which the department has a flourishing number. I have sent them copies of the costly new Callimachus volumes in the past year, but feel I really should try to do more, which is why I appeal to all of us as a community. Please consider donating any new books that you can spare, perhaps gratis or author discounted copies. I am aware that there are many competing demands on this resource, from significant omaggi to the convenience (often significant) of having a copy for one’s home study and university office. But given the gravity of their situation, I appeal to all of us to reconsider our priorities at this time: remember, ὑπá½²ρ πάντων – our debt to Greece is not a small one.

Packages may be sent to:

Prof. Ioannis Tzifopoulos, Chairman

or

Prof. Aimilios Mavroudis, Head of Department

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 12/31/2012 - 6:59pm by .

For the upcoming annual meeting in Seattle rooms at the convention rate ($139/night plus tax) are no longer available at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel.  The convention rate is still available at the Grand Hyatt Seattle Hotel.  The Hyatt is less than a city block away from the Washington State Convention Center where most sessions take place and almost as close to the Sheraton where many committee meetings and receptions will be located.  The institutions conducting job interviews who have rented their own suites are all located in the Hyatt.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/18/2012 - 5:05pm by Adam Blistein.

I have posted the Association's audited financial statements for the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2012.  I will discuss this report in my own Report of the Executive Director to be published at the end of this month, and I am happy to answer any individual questions that members may have. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 12/11/2012 - 6:43pm by Adam Blistein.

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