In Memoriam: Eleanor Jane Goltz Huzar (Granger)

(Written by Ward Briggs)

Eleanor Jane Goltz Huzar (Granger) was born on June 15, 1922, in St. Paul, Minnesota to a physician, Dr. Edward Victor Goltz, and his wife, Claire O’Neill Goltz. Raised in a family of doctors, Eleanor had every intention of becoming a doctor herself, but found “I had no talent for it,” and instead pursued her love of Roman history at the University of Minnesota (A.B., 1943) and later at Cornell (M.A. 1945; Ph.D., 1948). Her dissertation focused on the political, economic, and religious relations between the Roman Republic and Ptolemaic Egypt and she pursued the subject in a series of articles in CJ and later in a well-received biography of Marc Antony (1978), which Erich Gruen called “the best biography of Antony available in English.” She received the Prix de Rome of the AAR for 1978-80 and continued to travel in Europe during the summers. She contributed a number of deeply researched and authoritative articles on early emperors and, of course, Egypt for the encyclopedic Festschrift, Aufstieg und Niedergang der Römischen Welt.

Though she was a scrupulous researcher, her real love was teaching. After taking a succession of short-term positions, at Stanford (1948-50), the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (1951-5), Southeast Missouri State University (1955-9), and Carleton College (1959-60), she arrived at Michigan State in 1960 as the first full-time ancient historian and only the second woman on the faculty. She chaired the program in Classical Studies (1965-90). The university was primarily focused on teaching in those days, and Eleanor pitched in. She regularly taught the large (300-500 students) freshman survey course on world history from antiquity into the Middle Ages as well as intermediate reading courses and graduate courses, one year on Greece, the next on Rome. She chaired the Classical Studies Committee, which was a cooperative effort between classics, history, philosophy, and other programs. She regularly took her sabbaticals at the American Academy in Rome, whence she traveled widely around the Mediterranean lands that had previously been known to her only through books: “Egypt was one of the places that was still startling to me because it was so much simpler than the European pictures that we’d been seeing regularly. The mixed religion and the magnificent antiquities,…nothing else is comparable.”

Her service was not limited to MSU. She was a member of the selection committee for the National Endowment for Humanities (1979-84) and the Council for International Exchange Scholars, Washington (1979-81). She was President of CAMWS (1984-5), served on the advisory council of the for 30 years (1963-92) and the executive committee (1970-3, 1988-92). She also served on the managing committee of the ASCSA (1964-92).

On 21 June 1950 she married Elias Huzar, who died in December of that year. On October 11, 1991, she married Bruce I. Granger, who died in 2009. Eleanor herself died on May 7, 2018, in Golden Valley, MN.

---

(Photos: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0; "Eleanor Huzar" by Carleton College, used with permission)

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

According to U.S. News and World Report, "Med school officials say it's all Greek to them that classical language skills help aspiring doctors." Read the article, which quotes Cynthia Bannon and Charles McNelis, online.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 12/07/2011 - 7:45pm by Information Architect.

Many thanks to Chuck Jones for pointing out that back issues of Illinois Classical Studies are available in open access. See his entry on the subject at AWOL—The Ancient World Online.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Wed, 12/07/2011 - 2:19pm by .

A table listing all abstracts submitted for the 143rd Annual Meeting in Philadelphia has been posted on the APA web site.  Click on the title of the abstract to link to its text.  Abstracts are listed in the order in which they will appear in the printed program.

Authors are asked to review their abstracts to ensure that no information has been lost during the process of uploading the document.  A link at the bottom of the abstract will allow you to send an e-mail with any necessary corrections to Information Architect, Samuel Huskey.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 12/05/2011 - 4:28pm by Adam Blistein.

"How do you take a discipline that's been around as long as higher education itself and make it fresh, interesting, and new? Ask classics professor Dr. Rebecca Resinski. Through Your Hendrix Odyssey: Engaging in Active Learning and other engaged learning programs, classics students at Hendrix have participated in archaeological excavations and on-site study in Greece, Italy, and Portugal. One student group studied the Parthenon by travelling to Nashville, Tenn., where there is a life-size replica of the Parthenon; to London, where the Parthenon Marbles are kept in the British Museum; and to Athens, where the Parthenon itself stands on the Acropolis. Another group gave readings of Greek tragedies for the campus community and designed costumes for updated versions of Greek drama." Read more of the feature on Prof. Resinski at http://www.hendrix.edu/news/news.aspx?id=57174.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Sun, 12/04/2011 - 3:36pm by .

"Sixteen faculty in the University of Tennessee’s College of Arts and Sciences were honored for their extraordinary accomplishments at the college’s annual celebration of faculty on November 29, 2011. Awards were presented for excellence in teaching, research, student advising, outreach, and service. … Among the other honors presented, the Outstanding Service Award was given to Christopher Craig, professor and head of the Department of Classics, for his commitment to advancing the mission and goals of the college." Read the story at Tennessee Today.

View full article. | Posted in Member News on Sun, 12/04/2011 - 3:32pm by .

"John Bodel, chair of the classics department, is one of only a few scholars in the world working to digitize ancient manuscripts. On the other side of the Atlantic ocean, Michele Brunet, professor of Greek epigraphy at University of Lyon 2 in France, is working on a similar project, looking at ancient documents housed in Paris' Louvre Museum. Now, thanks to a new global exchange program launched by the University, professors like Bodel and Brunet will be able to share expertise in all disciplines by traveling to far-flung campuses to learn from their international colleagues." Read more at The Brown Daily Herald.

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 12/04/2011 - 3:29pm by Information Architect.

The late professor Douglass S. Parker was a professional jazz ragtime pianist, but he strayed from his musical career to teach at the University in order to support his family, said Stephen White, Department Chair and professor of Classics.

Douglass S. Parker taught at UT for 40 years and was commemorated Friday by a lecture and performance in light of his passing. The lecture and performance called “The Story of the Music in James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man (1912)” was given by James Tatum, a Dartmouth professor. Tatum played excerpts of classical piano pieces in honor of Parker’s talent for performance.

Read more in The Daily Texan

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 11/23/2011 - 2:14am by Information Architect.

"The most celebrated and supposedly one of the oldest symbols of the Eternal City may not be a product of the ancient world after all. The Capitoline Museums' statue of the legendary she-wolf, which was said to have nourished Rome's founders, Romulus and Remus on the banks of the River Tiber, was not crafted by the city's ancestors, the Etruscans, but was made at least 1,000 years later in the Middle Ages, some experts now insist."

Read more at The Independent

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Wed, 11/23/2011 - 2:10am by Information Architect.

Candidates wishing to use the APA/AIA Placement Service may register at the reduced early rate ($20 for e-mail service) until December 1, 2011.  Candidates must be members of either APA or AIA.  If the new online system does not recognize you as a member, and if you paid your dues recently, you will be permitted to register more quickly if you can forward a verification of your recent payment to Renie Plonski, the Placement Director (info@classicalstudies.org).

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 11/14/2011 - 9:36pm by Adam Blistein.

From Gibbon to "Gladiator," it might seem like we know a lot about Ancient Rome, but our view of this civilization is a skewed one. The Romans lived in one of the most stratified societies in history. Around 1.5% of the population controlled the government, military, economy and religion. Through the writings and possessions they left behind, these rich, upper-class men are also responsible for most of our information about Roman life.

The remaining people – commoners, slaves and others – are largely silent. They could not afford tombstones to record their names, and they were buried with little in the way of fancy pottery or jewellery. Their lives were documented by the elites, but they left few documents of their own.

Now, Kristina Killgrove, an archaeologist from Vanderbilt University, wants to tell their story by sequencing their DNA, and she is raising donations to do it. “Their DNA will tell me where these people, who aren’t in histories, were coming from,” she says. “They were quite literally the 99% of Rome.”

Read more on the Light Years blog at http://lightyears.blogs.cnn.com/2011/11/11/who-were-the-99-of-ancient-rome/

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Mon, 11/14/2011 - 1:16am by Information Architect.

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
ANCHORING TECHNOLOGY IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY
Public Statements
On October 13, 2019, the SCS Board of Directors approved the following letter
SCS Announcements
Departmental memberships for 2020 are now available.
Calls for Papers
"Space and Governance: Towards a New Topography of Roman Administration"

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy