In Memoriam: James Morwood

(From our colleagues at Wadham College)

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden death of Emeritus Fellow and Classicist James Morwood, at the age of 73, while on holiday in Greece. Details of a memorial service will be published in due course.

Below is a list of his accomplishments, adapted from his biography at Wadham College:

James Morwood was elected to a Fellowship at Wadham College in 1996, where he taught and served as Dean of Degrees, Steward of Common Room, and Dean (the last post from 2000 to 2006). He became an Emeritus Fellow in 2006 and was the Editor of the Wadham Gazette.

James was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, where he sat Part I of the Classical Tripos and Part II of the English Tripos. After a year at Merton College, Oxford on the course for the Diploma of Education, he went to Harrow School in September 1966 to teach Classics and English. He spent 30 years at Harrow, the last seventeen of them as Head of Classics. He was deeply involved in school journalism and drama, working with Richard Curtis and Ben Cumberbatch among many others. He was librarian for more than eleven years, and sat on and later chaired the school’s Treasures Committee, a body which brought into existence the Old Speech Room Gallery.

In 1996 he moved to Oxford University and took up the post of Grocyn Lecturer in the Classics Faculty and served for a year as President of the Oxford Philological Society.

James was a committed member of the Joint Association of Classical Teachers and held the Presidency of the Association for 1999-2001, becoming an Honorary Member in 2011. He was President of the London Association of Classical Teachers for 1995-6; was a regular tutor at the JACT Greek Summer School at Cheltenham and Bryanston since 1970, served as its Director of Studies, and its Director. He also taught classics and English literature at the University Of Cambridge Institute Of Continuing Education.

With Eric Dugdale, he was editing a new series for the Cambridge University Press entitled ‘Greece and Rome; Texts and Contexts’. His revision of the Oxford Latin Course for North American college students was published in January 2012; his book on Hadrian (Bloomsbury) was published in the summer 2013.

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(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

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APA Member, Christopher B. Krebs, Stanford University, has won Phi Beta Kappa's Christian Gauss Award for his work Most Dangerous Book: Tacitus’s Germania from the Roman Empire to the Third Reich.  Phi Beta Kappa has given the Gauss Award since 1950 for books in the field of literary scholarship and criticism. 

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 03/21/2013 - 2:01pm by Adam Blistein.

The Department of Classics at the University of California Berkeley reports with sadness the death of Charles Murgia.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Fri, 03/08/2013 - 7:48pm by Adam Blistein.

There has been a lot of talk in the US recently about the importance of encouraging the study of the so-called STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics).  In the UK, the civil service has long been advocating such an emphasis on STEM, although it is revealing that in the US people still tend to focus on whether this or that education is a good “investment” for the individual, whereas in Britain the government agencies are more concerned with which education is best for society as a whole (on “investment” as the wrong metaphor in the first place, see Bob Connor’s recent post).

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 03/06/2013 - 8:40pm by Adam Blistein.

National Latin Teacher Recruitment Week asks as many educators as possible across the nation (and beyond!) to find one day to talk to their students about becoming secondary Latin teachers. NLTRW was created to address the Latin teacher shortage that we are facing in this country. The demand for Latin continues to grow, in great measure due to our own best efforts to raise awareness about the importance and richness of the study of Latin. Now that we have created the demand, it is time to create the teachers.  NLTRW is scheduled for the first full week in March, but if you cannot speak to your students that week due to testing or holidays or whatever, just pick another day of another week. The most important thing is to talk to your students about becoming teachers.  For more information, including ideas, free posters to download, and funding opportunities, point your browser to promotelatin.org and click on the NLTRW link.
 
Ronnie Ancona
APA VP for Education

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Wed, 03/06/2013 - 1:25am by .

Deadline: August 31, 2013

With the goal of promoting and encouraging a critical reflection on the permanence of personages, values and perspectives from the ancient and medieval world(s) in western literature and culture, the Research Area "Classical Antiquity: Texts and Contexts" of the Center for Classical Studies, in collaboration with the Center of History, of the Faculty of Letters of the University of Lisbon, is organising an international conference on "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World".

The conference, to be held February 17-19, 2014, aims at bringing together different fields of research to deal with the theme of violence and its multiple interpretations, representations and narratives in the ancient and medieval worlds.

Having in mind this interdisciplinary approach, the international conference "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World" has the purpose of:

  • approaching the criteria/standards of violence in the historical and literary contexts of Antiquity and the Middle Ages;
  • examining representations and readings of violence in literature and material culture;
  • pondering the ancient and medieval worlds as stages of violence in its various manifestations.

Abstracts

The conference organisers invite paper proposals on the topic "Violence in the Ancient and Medieval World". We welcome abstracts on the following subtopics from all social and human sciences:

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Sat, 03/02/2013 - 7:30pm by .

The Institute for Advance Study School of Historical Studies presents Opportunities for Scholars for 2014-2015.  The Institute is an independent private institution founded in 1930 to create a community of scholars focused on intellectual inquiry, free from teaching and other university obligations.  Classics is one of the School’s principal interests, but the program is open to all fields of historical research.   Scholars from around the world come to the Institute to pursue their own research.  Candidates of any nationality may apply for a single term or a full academic year.  Scholars may apply for a stipend, but those with sabbatical funding, other grants, retirement funding or other means are also invited to apply for a non-stipendiary membership.  The Institute provides access to extensive resources including offices, libraries, subsidized restaurant and housing facilities, and some secretarial services.  Residence in Princeton during term time is required.  The only other obligation of Members is to pursue their own research.  The Ph.D. (or equivalent) and substantial publications are required.  Information and application forms may be found on the School's web site, or contact the School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Dr., Princeton, N.J. 08540 (E-mail address:mzelazny@ias.edu).  Deadline: November 1, 2013.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Fri, 03/01/2013 - 7:04pm by Adam Blistein.

An important “Roundtable of links” on “the value of the Humanities” has just been set up by James Grossman, the Executive Director of the American Historical Association; I urge members to have a look at the range of articles and opinion pieces there.  This is an important initiative at a time when—as Grossman puts it—“politicians and business leaders across the country have sharply attacked humanistic and social science disciplines as not only frivolous (an old charge as pertaining to the humanities) but also a waste of taxpayers’ money and students’ time”.  You can access a variety of papers on this site, including one by APA member Peter Burian.  I am sure you will find much ammunition there for your own debates with students and their parents, with administrators and colleagues in other disciplines.  It is heartening to see such spirited and well-informed advocacy for the intrinsic value and the social importance of the humanistic and social science disciplines.  But we will have to keep making that case.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 02/26/2013 - 7:51pm by Adam Blistein.

From The Baltimore Sun:

Georg H.B. Luck, whose career teaching the classics at the Johns Hopkins University spanned two decades and included studying the role magic and witchcraft played in the theology and world of the ancient Greeks and Romans, died Sunday from complications of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson.

He was 87 and a longtime resident of the city's Poplar Hill neighborhood.

"Georg was a modest man who had great gusto for the things that interested him," said Richard A. Macksey, a noted Baltimore bibliophile and professor of humanities at Hopkins. "He was the kind of person who could interest the general public in what might appear to many to be very dry work. He saw the relationship between theology, witchcraft and magic."

"He was a pioneer in the study of magic and witchcraft in the theology of the ancient Greeks and Romans," said Matthew B. Roller, a professor and former chairman of the classics department at Hopkins. "It was the first serious study and he collected all of the material."

View full article. | Posted in In Memoriam on Sun, 02/24/2013 - 4:45pm by .

Silius Italicus Poetry and Historiography, a Conference at Washington University in St. Louis, March 23rd 2013, 10AM-4:30PM.  After a long and varied career as a lawyer and politician, Silius Italicus devoted his last years to the writing of poetry. During the reign of Domitian (81-96 CE) he composed an extensive epic on the Second Punic War, choosing the third decade of Livy as his main source and Virgil’s Aeneid as the predominant epic model. Silius’ poetic achievements have not met with much approval over the centuries: for many modern scholars, his work has been a classic example of a rather slavish and uninspired form of imitatio. During the last few decades, however, a reappraisal has taken place, and scholars have begun to appreciate the striking originality of Silius’ approach to his topic.

The papers of this conference will focus on an important part of this new appreciation: aspects of Silius’ relationship to the older historiographical and epic tradition that have not previously been appreciated. They will not only provide new insights for specialists, but they will also present a lively introduction both to an author who deserves more scholarly attention and to a literary practice—the mixing of historiography and poetry—that has played an important role from the time of Herodotus until today.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Wed, 02/20/2013 - 6:26pm by Adam Blistein.

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