In Memoriam: John C. Traupman

(Posted, with permission, from Meaningful Funerals)

Dr. John C. Traupman, of Penn Valley / Narberth, PA., a World War II veteran, University Professor, author of translation dictionaries of languages in Latin and German to English, and a prolific author of may Latin related subjects, died on February 18, 2019 at the Bryn Mawr Hospital. He was 96. His wife Pauline Temmel Traupman, whom he was married to for 70 years, died on December 7, 2018.

Dr. Traupman was born in Nazareth, PA., attended Geneva Seminary in Ohio, and enlisted in the US Army after graduating from high school. Although fluent in German, he was sent to Japan where he became fluent in that language while rising to the rank of Sgt. Major. After the war he enrolled and graduated from Moravian College with a degree in Latin and the Classics. He went on to earn a doctorate from Princeton University.  He joined the St. Joseph's College (now University) faculty where he enjoyed a 38 year career as a University professor, the last 30 years as head of the classical department. John was also instrumental in the growth of the Philadelphia Classical Society where he was president for 8 years. He also found time to teach night school at Villanova University form many years. He published numerous books and was highly sought after as a public speaker at universities and public events. He covered subjects such as Roman, Greek, Egyptian history and archaeology.  John received numerous awards and was known world wide for his publications that are still being used in Universities to this day.

He is survived by his sister Rose Yost, his daughter Diane Phillips, grandson Colin Phillips, son-in-law Nick Phillips and many nieces and nephews. There will be a prvate family gathering in Nazareth, PA.

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(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)  

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Most people nowadays read classical literature in translation, if they read it at all. This isn't at all a bad thing, or something that classicists need to waste time lamenting. Getting even an "intermediate level" knowledge of Latin or Greek is a hard slog, and life is not infinite: dum loquimur, fugerit invida aetas: "Time is a hater, and while we are talking, she's gone". Translation is the means by which most people will read Horace. If we wonder about one version (as we probably will about my deliberately-debatable stab at this line: did the Romans really have "haters"?), we can compare it with multiple others: "envious time"? "hostile time"? "jealous time"? Any of these choices makes a different suggestion about what kind of person time might be, how we should feel about her tendency to scarper, and what drives her animosity towards us.

In this context, it's not surprising that new translations of classical texts are rolling off the presses at an alarming rate. I write as one of the hordes currently working on a new translation of the Odyssey. It is notable that many of my fellow-translators are not tenured academics: translation has a fairly marginal position in the contemporary academy (and certainly won't get you tenure), but it is a practice that ought to be of interest to all of us, as scholars, as teachers and as defenders of our discipline. Translation is the most direct means by which we communicate these texts to a large number of people.

View full article. | Posted in on Thu, 03/13/2014 - 1:28pm by Emily Wilson.
Sicily, Crossroads of History, Dec. 27, 2014-Jan. 4 or 7, 2015, Director: Beverly Berg

Sicily is a true crossroads of history, with striking archaeological remains from antiquity and beautiful churches from Medieval and Baroque times. Our program takes a complete circle tour of this magical island. We begin with a visit to beautiful Taormina, then on to Syracuse, where Timoleon and Plato once walked. We contemplate the golden temples of Agrigento, Selinunte, and Segesta, some of the best preserved temples of Classical Greek times. The program ends in Palermo, and there is an optional post-classical continuation to see more of Palermo, once a Punic town, beautified by Norman French rulers in the 12th century and Aragonese rulers thereafter.

Price: 8 night version: $1,595 per person, single supplement of $200. 11 night version: $1,995, single supplement $275.  Price will include hotels, breakfasts, dinners except in Syracuse and the extra nights in Palermo, ground transportation, and entry fees.  Price will NOT include airfare, dinners in Syracuse and on post-classical extension in Palermo, and transfer from Palermo airport to hotel, or (for those on post-classical extension) from hotel to airport.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 03/13/2014 - 11:22am by Adam Blistein.
The Program in Ancient Studies at Indiana University (http://www.indiana.edu/~ancient/home/) will host a conference on the topic of the miniature and the minor on April 11-12, 2014, on the Bloomington campus.  Whereas so much of our research implicitly or explicitly concerns the monumental and the major, we propose to investigate the miniature and the minor in antiquity from five distinct disciplinary perspectives: Classical Studies, History, History of Art, Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, and Religious Studies. We are interested not only in the realia of the miniature and the minor but in the construction of those categories by both ancients and moderns. We are interested in the miniature and minor both in their own rights and as counterpoints to the monumental and the major. We are less interested in simply demanding that attention be paid to the neglected and the overlooked. 
 
For further information, please contact Jonathan Ready (jready@indiana.edu) or visit the conference web site:  http://www.indiana.edu/~ancient/events/Con2014.shtml
View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 03/13/2014 - 10:07am by Adam Blistein.

The Department of Classics at the University of Reading (UK) has recently launched a new interdisciplinary MA course in ‘Ancient Maritime Trade and Navigation’ in collaboration with Ca’ Foscari University in Italy. This unique MA focuses on the history of maritime trade, shipbuilding, and navigation techniques in the Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean, and the archaeology of port infrastructures, ships, and trade goods.

The duration of the program of study is 12 months; Reading courses draw on the research expertise of academic staff within the Departments of Classics, Economics, and Archaeology, as well as the Centre for Economic History.  The two-month long Venice course combines seminars, lectures and site visits and is taught in English by staff of the Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici of Ca’ Foscari. Students will also have the option to take part in one of the underwater excavation projects run by Ca’ Foscari over the summer. Applications for the academic year 2014/15 close on June 1, 2014.

View full article. | Posted in Degree and Certificate Programs on Wed, 03/12/2014 - 4:08pm by Adam Blistein.

Heckman Stipends, made possible by the A.A. Heckman Endowed Fund at St. John's College in Collegeville, MN, are awarded semi-annually. Up to 10 stipends in amounts up to $2,000 are available each year. Funds may be applied toward travel to and from Collegeville, housing and meals at Saint John’s University, and costs related to duplication of HMML’s microfilm or digital resources. The Stipend may be supplemented by other sources of funding but may not be held simultaneously with another HMML Stipend or Fellowship. Holders of the Stipend must wait at least two years before applying again.  The program is specifically intended to help scholars who have not yet established themselves professionally and whose research cannot progress satisfactorily without consulting materials to be found in the collections of the Hill Museum &Manuscript Library.

Applications must be submitted by April 15 for residencies between July and December of the same year, or by November 15 for residencies between January and June of the following year.  Applicants are asked to provide:

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 03/12/2014 - 10:45am by Adam Blistein.

The Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach-Stiftung announces two to four scholarships for non-German postgraduates or non-German scholars with a PhD to conduct research at the Historisches Institut, Abt. Alte Geschichte, University of Cologne.  Scholarships are for periods ranging between 6 and 24 months. Recipients of the scholarships will receive amounts that correspond with those granted by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (currently about 1.200 € per month for a postgraduate, 1.800 € per month for a scholar with a PhD.).  The scholarships are intended for projects from all disciplines of classical studies pertaining to the general topic of "centre and periphery", but projects in Greek or Latin epigraphy of the high empire and late antiquity are especially encouraged.

View full article. | Posted in Awards and Fellowships on Wed, 03/05/2014 - 3:23pm by Adam Blistein.

As part of Aquila Theatre’s National Endowment for the Humanities multiyear Award for You|Stories, Aquila will explore Sophocles’ ancient play Philoctetes and reimagine it with the title role played as a female combat soldier. Aquila Theatre is a veteran of Greek Classical Theatre and will boldly take on this newest endeavor. Join us as we present, A Female Philoctetes, a staged reading, translated by Peter Meineck and directed and adapted by Desiree Sanchez. Post show talk backs to follow each performance. This event is part of You|Stories – Aquila’s innovative public program funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, which uses ancient drama to inspire modern stories. An interactive You|Stories app and web platform will allow the veteran community and the public to explore these ancient stories and be inspired to tell their own. These new narratives will be archived at the Library of Congress. 

Performances will take place at BAM Fisher, 321 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, NY 11217 at 7:00 p.m. from April 16-19.  Call 718.636.4100 for tickets or visit http://www.bam.org/theater/2014/a-female-philoctetes

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Tue, 03/04/2014 - 3:44pm by Adam Blistein.

The Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS) seeks a Webmaster to work jointly with our current Webmaster beginning on or about June 1, 2014, and to assume full responsibility beginning October 11, 2014. The position has a three-year, renewable term, subject to annual review by the CAAS Board of Directors. The annual stipend will be $4,000, subject to approval by the Board.

The Webmaster will manage the online process of submitting and evaluating abstracts to support the Program Committee; maintain the platforms supporting the organization’s work (e.g. WordPress, Google Apps, Insightly) and identify new platforms as needed; facilitate document-sharing for Board meetings; manage email aliases for Board members, and so forth.

In consultation with CAAS senior officers, the Webmaster will have editorial oversight of articles posted on the website and will have responsibility for publishing announcements to the CAAS community online and via email. The Webmaster also will guide CAAS in implementing and overseeing social media in support of our mission.

Applicants should send a cover letter and a curriculum vitae by April 1, 2014, to the chair of the search committee: Professor Janet M. Martin, CAAS President, by email at <jmmartin@princeton.edu>.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 03/04/2014 - 10:44am by Adam Blistein.

Unexpectedly spending a couple of extra days in Chicago this January, as I viewed quiet snowfall against the backdrop of the seasonal lights on the Wrigley Building and watched the gradual freezing of the Chicago River, I found moments of calm to reflect on the state of our APA as I had come to know it during my year as President-Elect. One deceptively simple word seemed to encapsulate the complex process of finding our way forward in this fast-paced world as an organization devoted to the distant past, and that word is service. The APA is a service organization, which has traditionally meant service to those who choose to be members but now increasingly means also service to others, to any and all who wish to participate in our various explorations of the classical world. How to frame the interaction of these two is our current challenge.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/26/2014 - 11:00am by Adam Blistein.

The Digital Latin Library (DLL) will be a site on the Internet where people with varying levels of interest and expertise in Latin can find, read, discuss, study, teach, edit, and annotate Latin texts of all eras, whether for personal use or for open-access, peer-reviewed publication by one of the three learned societies affiliated with the project: the American Philological Association (APA), the Medieval Academy of America (MAA), and the Renaissance Society of America (RSA). Similar to a traditional public research library, the DLL will have a catalog, a variety of collections of texts and reference materials, and working space for both individuals and groups. Unlike a research library, it will also provide tools to facilitate the creation and publication of open, born-digital critical editions and other scholarly and pedagogical resources that take full advantage of powerful technologies and techniques such as Linked Open Data (LOD), information visualization, and visual data analysis, opening up new possibilities for the communication of scholarly ideas.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 02/26/2014 - 10:55am by Adam Blistein.

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