In Memoriam: Robert A. Seelinger

(Written by Ted Tarkow)

An alum of Dickinson, Brown, and the University of Missouri (MU), Bob Seelinger (1951-2018) taught classics at Westminster College in Fulton, MO, from 1979 until taking early retirement in 2015, necessitated by a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.  By the time of his death, he had served as professor of classics for over 20 years and in addition had served as Dean of the Faculty and Vice President of the College for over a half dozen years at the campus made famous by the “Iron Curtain” speech delivered there   in 1946 by Winston Churchill.

A beloved teacher, Bob taught all levels of both languages as well as a wide range of general education courses.  Not surprisingly to the scores of Westminster students who had studied with him, he received the APA Award for Excellence in the Teaching of the Classics, the Governor’s Award for Teaching, and the Parents’ Association Award for Teaching, among many other recognitions.    But his career also allowed presentations and publications in some of his favorite authors, from Apuleius (the focus of his PhD dissertation), to 4th century, Republican, and early Imperial authors and genres.  His abundant time at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, as well as at two NEH Summer Seminars, enabled other students and scholars to make the most of their time there.

A devoted family man, Bob met his wife Cathy Callaway, herself an accomplished professional in the field, when they both studied classics at MU where their son, not surprisingly, also majored in classics, as well as in political science. The family enjoyed traveling together, most notably to Greece, where they enjoyed three different sabbatical  years, the last one in 2005-06.

Until just weeks before he passed away, Bob was working on two projects:  an update of William Parrish’s Westminster College, An Informal History (with Margot McMillen) and an analysis  (with Cathy Callaway) of a Greek funeral stele (2nd-3rd century A.D.) dedicated to Heliodora in the Museum of Art and Archaeology at MU.   He never lost his zeal for research, and his love of teaching.

The proud tradition of classics in the “Show Me” state is honored to acknowledge, with abundant admiration, the life and legacy of a talented exemplar of our profession, a true kalos kagathos for whom more modern adjectives seem especially appropriate:   learned, kind, thoughtful, and brave.

(Written by Cathy Callaway)

ROBERT ADAM SEELINGER died on September 22, 2018, on his father’s birthday, after a four- and a-half-year battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington DC on October 16, 1951. An Eagle Scout, he attended Rogers High School in Newport, Rhode Island, and Dickinson College, in Pennsylvania. He spent his junior year in Rome. He received an MA from Brown University, and a PhD in Classics and Classical Archaeology from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1981. Seelinger learned Latin at an early age and continued to read, write, and teach it his whole life. He was also a scholar of ancient Greek, and during his three sabbatical years in Greece he became fluent in Modern Greek.

He moved to Columbia, MO in 1974 to pursue his PhD in the Department of Classical Studies. He started teaching Latin and other Classics courses part-time at Westminster College in 1979. The position became full-time and tenure-track in 1981.

From 1999-2005 he served as Dean of Faculty and Vice President of the College. He was a leader in the initiative to start a Westminster campus in Mesa, AZ and was grateful for the support and dedication of all those who were involved in that project. He was gratified by the fact that many of the Mesa students continued their Westminster experience on the Fulton campus. He was deeply moved by the retirement celebration he shared with other colleagues in 2016.

He is survived by his wife, Cathy Callaway, his son, Nicholas Seelinger, his sister, Barbara (Robert) Beebe of Middletown RI, and nephew Adam Carter of Tacoma WA, and two great nephews. He also leaves behind a beloved host of relatives on Cathy’s side that consider him family; several were present at his peaceful death in his home. Thanks to the people at Hospice Compassus and Dr. Anna Hulbert for making this possible. We would also like to thank ALL the health care professionals, at the University Hospital in Columbia, at Mayo in Rochester MN, at Barnes in St Louis, and the Emergency Technicians in Fulton, who showed such compassion, care, and expertise every time they worked with him to cope with the challenges of this disease.

Celebration of Robert's life will be 2:00 pm Sunday, October 21, 2018 at the Church of St. Mary Aldermanbury located on the Westminster College Campus, 501 Westminster Ave. in Fulton, Missouri. A reception will follow the service. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be directed to either Westminster College, Mayo Clinic in Rochester MN, or the Fulton Soup Kitchen c/o Debo Funeral Home, 833 Court Street, Fulton, Missouri 65251.

---

(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)   

Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

Reframing Wisdom Literature. Problematising Literary and Religious Interactions in Ancient Wisdom Texts

King's College London, 30-31 May 2019

Confirmed keynote speaker: Prof Dimitri Gutas, Yale University

Registration is now open for the postgraduate conference "Reframing Wisdom Literature. Problematising Literary and Religious Interactions in Ancient Wisdom Texts." The programme is included below and you can read more about our aims and about the line up here: https://hcommons.org/app/uploads/sites/1001234/2019/04/RWL-booklet.pdf

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Tue, 04/16/2019 - 9:34am by Erik Shell.

Please note that the deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 15.

You can submit your abstract via our online Program Submission System  

---

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/15/2019 - 8:37am by Erik Shell.

'Addressing the Divide' is a new series of columns that looks at the ways in which the modern field of Classics was constructed and then explores ways to identify, modify, or simply abolish the lines between fields in order to embrace broader ideas of what Classics was, is, and could be. This month, Sarah Bond discusses the partition between Biblical Studies and the field of Classics.

View full article. | Posted in on Sat, 04/13/2019 - 6:56am by Sarah E. Bond.

The index and all the published volumes of the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (A–M, O–P, and Onomasticon C–D) are now available as open access pdfs from the Bavarian Academy:

http://www.thesaurus.badw.de/tll-digital/tll-open-access.html

Please note that the pdfs may currently be slow to load.


Picture: "Library of the Thesaurus linguae latinae" by N. P. Holmes, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

 
 

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Fri, 04/12/2019 - 11:29am by Helen Cullyer.
POWER AND KNOWLEDGE
in Plato and the Platonic Tradition
22-24 May, Uppsala (Sweden)

Registration is now open for the international symposium ‘Power & Knowledge in Plato and the Platonic Tradition', which will take place at the department of philosophy at Uppsala University on the 22nd-24th of May 2019. The program is included below. For more information about the symposium and what we hope to achieve, see: http://rationalselfgovernment.se/power-and-knowledge/.

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 12:10pm by Erik Shell.

DEADLINE for abstracts: 1 June 2019

Invention has fascinated audiences at least since the god Hephaestus created self-locomoting robot-women as workshop assistants—and Prometheus’ theft of fire allowed humans to develop their own technology. From Méliès’ re-creation of Lucian’s trip to the moon, to myriad takes on Pygmalion fabricating the “perfect woman,” to Hypatia’s fatal scientific inquiry in Amenábar’s Agora, on-screen depictions of invention and technology in the ancient Mediterranean world and the classical tradition have dramatized their potential to delight, empower, and enlighten—as well as the ethical and moral concerns they stimulate.

View full article. | Posted in Calls for Papers on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 10:46am by Erik Shell.

Those who will submit Individual Abstracts for the 2020 Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. should sign up for their SCS memberships by this Friday, April 11th, as memberships take a couple days to process and all submissions must come from SCS Members.

You can renew or sign up for SCS membership here: https://scs.press.jhu.edu/membership/join

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Thu, 04/11/2019 - 10:28am by Erik Shell.

We would like to remind SCS members who are considering submitting for the 2020 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., that the Lightning Talk format - launched this year at our Sesquicentennial - is returning for 2020 as well.

Members who have a topic about which they are passionate and can speak succinctly are encouraged to apply.

---

(Photo: "_DSC7061" by rhodesj, licensed under CC BY 2.0)

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 04/10/2019 - 2:41pm by Erik Shell.

Please note these important upcoming deadlines:

1. The deadline for submission of the following is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 8:

  • Panel, seminar, workshop, and roundtable proposals for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Affiliated group and organizer-refereed panel reports for the 2020 Annual Meeting
  • Applications for renewed or new charters for affiliated groups
  • Applications for organizer-refereed panels for the 2021 Annual Meeting

2. The deadline for submission of individual abstracts for paper and poster presentations and of short abstracts for lightning talks is 11.59pm EDT, Monday April 15.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 04/08/2019 - 8:26am by Erik Shell.
Teaching Rome at Home:  The Classics in America
A conference at the University of Maryland, College Park
May 2-4, 2019

Thursday, May 2

3:30 PM  Keynote lecture:  “The Lion in the Path:  Classics Meets Modernity”
Hunter R. Rawlings III, Professor and University President Emeritus, Cornell University

5:00 PM  Reception

Friday, May 3

1:00 – 1:50  “The ‘Gender Turn’ in Classics,” Eva Stehle, University of Maryland, Emerita

1:50 – 2:00  Break

2:00 – 3:30  Paper session

2:00  “The Value of Latin in the Liberal Arts Curriculum,” Norman Austin, University of Arizona, Emeritus

2:30  “Vergil’s Aeneid and Twenty-first Century Immigration,” Christopher Nappa, University of Minnesota

3:00  “A Latin Curriculum Set in Africa Proconsularis,” Holly Sypniewski, Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi; Kenneth Morrell, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee; and Lindsay Samson, Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia

3:30 – 4:00  Break

4:00 – 5:00  Workshop:  “Confronting Sexual Violence in the Secondary Latin Classroom,” Danielle Bostick, John Handley High School, Winchester, Virginia

5:00  Reception

Saturday, May 4

10:00 - 12:00  Paper session

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Fri, 04/05/2019 - 9:15am by Erik Shell.

Pages

Latest Stories

SCS Announcements
The Society for Classical Studies is proud to announce an upgrade to our Prec
Public Statements
Recently, the SCS has focused attention on the importance on the variety of c
Calls for Papers
The twenty-second biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance
Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings
The Presence of Plotinus: The Self, Contemplation, a

© 2019, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy