In Memoriam: Theodore V. Buttrey, Jr.

(Written by Sarah E. Cox, and shared with the SCS by Ofelia N. Salgado-Buttrey)

Theodore V. Buttrey, Jr.

29 December 1929 – 9 January 2018

Renowned educator, numismatist and classicist, Theodore V. (“Ted”) Buttrey, Jr., died on January 9, 2018, eleven days after his 88th birthday.  Born in Havre, Montana, as a child he attended the Peacock Military Academy in San Antonio, Texas, where he first encountered the coins of Mexico, a life-long interest.  His secondary education was at the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, after which he entered Princeton University, graduating magna cum laude in 1950 in Classics.  In the summer of 1952, he participated in the inaugural Summer Seminar in Numismatics conducted by the American Numismatic Society, an experience that may well have been pivotal in setting the later course of his career.  In 1953, still at Princeton, he completed his Ph.D. thesis on a numismatic subject, “Studies in the Coinage of Marc Anthony,” a chapter of which was condensed and published as “Thea Neotera on Coins of Antony and Cleopatra,” ANS Museum Notes 6 (1954), pp. 95-109.  There followed a Fulbright scholarship to study in Rome.

In 1954 Ted joined the faculty of Yale University, where he remained for a decade, first as an instructor and then as assistant professor in the Department of Classical Studies; he also served as curator of the numismatic collection and, from 1962 to 1964, as assistant professor in the Department of Medieval Studies.  In 1964 he moved to the University of Michigan, where he remained until his retirement in 1985, starting as associate professor of Greek and Latin and rising to full professor in 1968.  From 1969 to 1971 he also served as Director of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.  After retiring from Michigan he moved to the University of Cambridge, to become an Affiliated Lecturer in the Faculty of Classics of Clare Hall College, where he had previously been a Visiting Fellow and Resident Member.  In addition, from 1988 to 1991 he served as Keeper of Coins and Medals at the Fitzwilliam Museum, and from 2008 until his death held the post of Honorary Keeper of Coins.  Ted was a life member of the SCS (the APA at that time) and the AIA, as well as a member of the Royal Numismatic Society and the Société Française de Numismatique, and he received a host of awards and honors, including the Medal of the Royal Numismatic Society, the Huntington Medal of the ANS, the medal of the Norwegian Numismatic Society, and the Wolfgang Hahn Medal of the Institut für Numismatik und Geldgeschichte of Vienna University.

Ted’s publications, both books and articles, totaled well over 100.  Most were concerned with topics in numismatics, especially antiquity, where the broad span of his interests encompassed Athenian coins, Republican denarii, Flavian coins, the coinage of Pescennius Niger, and even calculating ancient coin production.  The modern era of numismatics also consumed much of his time, and a challenge to the authenticity of a collector’s gold bars of the Spanish-American southwest even got his name in the newspapers.  But he never forsook his devotion to Classics, as evidenced by his early article, “Accident and Design in Euripides’ Medea,” published in AJP in 1958, while he was at Yale, and to an even greater extent by the television programs he produced for Michigan Media on Homer, Greek drama and theatre, Herodotus, Suetonius, and other classical subjects.  As recently as 2015, in conversations at the International Numismatic Congress in Taormina, he discussed plans for a book on the role of fate in Oedipus Rex, arguing against the idea of unshakeable destiny.

While never thought of as one who suffered fools gladly, he was a charismatic teacher and approachable mentor, encouraging of younger scholars, as well as a witty and engaging raconteur.  He will be greatly missed, but he leaves an immense legacy for his students, colleagues, and family to cherish and spread.

---

(Photo: "Candle" by Shawn Carpenter, licensed under CC BY 2.0)   


Categories

Follow SCS News for information about the SCS and all things classical.

Use this field to search SCS News
Select a category from this list to limit the content on this page.

We are launching a new feature on our website, "Guest Blogs," and we invite you to check it out and see what you think. Our field is amazingly varied, and there are new developments on the move in all parts of that variety, so that it seemed a good idea to have a forum where members can be kept up to date, informed, and--ideally-entertained in the process. We have invited a dozen Classicists to contribute regular columns (to keep an archaic print term that seems to have survived into the new medium).  We have tried to cover as much of the range of our subject as we can, and a geographical span as well, to capture at least some of the range of perspectives and expertises under the umbrella of our organization.

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Mon, 11/04/2013 - 3:10pm by Adam Blistein.

We are posting a call for signatures to a petition launched by our colleagues in France, and circulated by John Bulwer of Euroclassica.  We thought this was an important petition to draw to your attention, and we urge members to read the message and to consider signing the petition.

Denis Feeney

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Sun, 11/03/2013 - 1:47pm by Adam Blistein.

If you are a teacher at the pre-collegiate level and have student loans, please read carefully through everything at the following link. You may be eligible for forgiveness and/or cancellation.

http://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/charts/teacher

Ronnie Ancona

APA VP for Education

View full article. | Posted in SCS Announcements on Wed, 10/30/2013 - 10:03pm by Ronnie Ancona.

From the iTunes App Store:

Use one app to look up any Greek or Latin word: Logeion was developed at the University of Chicago to provide simultaneous lookup of entries in the many reference works that make up the Perseus Classical collection. Most reference works represented in this app are based on digitized texts from the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University.

  • Liddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon (1940)
  • Liddell and Scott's Intermediate Greek Lexicon (1889)
  • Autenrieth's Homeric Dictionary
  • Slater's Lexicon to Pindar (1969)
  • Lewis's Elementary Latin Dictionary (1890)
  • Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities
  • Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites
  • Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography
  • Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities
  • Perseus Encyclopedia

The app draws data from the following Greek and Latin textbooks.

View full article. | Posted in Websites and Resources on Sat, 10/26/2013 - 10:08am by .

In recognition of Open Access Week, the "Profhacker" blog at The Chronicle for Higher Education has posted an instructional video about open access. Although it deals exclusively with open access as it applies to research in the sciences, it is relevant for scholars in the humanities, too.

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Thu, 10/24/2013 - 9:39am by .

California Classical Studies is pleased to announce as No. 2 in its series the publication of a digital edition of Edward Courtney, A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal, a reprint with corrections of the edition of 1980. The 555-page book may be read in page view at the open-access eScholarship repository operated by the California Digital Library of the University of California. It is also available as a Print on Demand paperback ($49.95) or in ePub format ($29.95). After an embargo period of 2 years, the open-access site will provide a free download of the full print-quality PDF.

Open-access page for A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal:

http://escholarship.org/uc/item/4jh846pn

Site for purchase of POD paperback or ePub version of California Classical Studies books:

http://escholarship-california_classical_studies.lulu.com/spotlight/

Information for potential contributors to the series:

http://calclassicalstudies.org/?page_id=42

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 10/21/2013 - 9:48pm by .

(CNN) -- Clusters of Roman skulls have been discovered deep below London's Liverpool Street by construction workers digging a new rail route through England's capital.

Tunnelers working on the Crossrail project found about 20 skulls, deep beneath the 16th century Bedlam burial ground in the center of the city, Crossrail said in a statement.

Read more: Rail excavation unearths suspected 'plague pit'

View full article. | Posted in Classics in the News on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:51am by Information Architect.

Sorbonne, Paris 13th and 14th February 2014

We have now placed the program and the abstracts for the final session of our series on
Roman Declamation - Calpurnius Flaccus - on the conference website.

https://sites.google.com/site/readingromandeclamation/2014-session

The event will take place 13th and 14th February 2014 in the Sorbonne's Maison de la
Recherche, 28 Rue Serpente, 75006 Paris (map on the website).

Speakers:
Michael Winterbottom (Oxford)
Christopher van den Berg (Amherst)
Catherine Schneider (Strasbourg)
Lydia Spielberg (University of Pennsylvania)
Biagio Santorelli (Pisa)
Alessandra Rolle (Lausanne)
Julien Pingoud (Lausanne)
Jonathan Mannering (Loyola, Chicago)
Alfredo Casamento (Palermo)
Lauren Cadwell (Wesleyan University)
Andrea Balbo (Turin)

Chairs:
Jean Michel David (Pantheon-Sorbonne)
Sylvie Franchet d'Esperey (Sorbonne)
Danielle van Mal Mader (Lausanne)

Organisers:
Martin Dinter (KCL/FAPESP-USP)
Charles Guerin (Montpellier and Institut universitaire de France)
Marcos Martinho (University of Sao Paulo)
Sebastien Morlet (Paris IV - Sorbonne)

View full article. | Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Meetings on Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:19am by .

I am happy to report that we have just received the message below from Dr. Martin Brady, Chair of the Central Council of the Classical Association of Ireland.

Denis Feeney

--------------------

Dear all,

I have just received news that proposals to close the Department of Classics in Cork and transfer its staff to the Department of History have been withdrawn. Classics maintains an independent identity at University College Cork - for now, at least. Sincere thanks for all of you who signed the petition, and for all of you who wrote to the President of UCC to make your feelings on this matter known.

best & regards,

Dr Martin Brady

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Mon, 10/14/2013 - 11:20am by Adam Blistein.

Dear friends, sympathizers and fellow classicists,

In 2012, the Faculty of Arts decided to gradually cut down Latin as a major subject. However, the detailed budget plan now anticipates the abandonment of all Latin courses, as well as the introductory courses of Ancient Greek and most subjects relating to classical culture. By this radical cutting off of the classical roots, the faculty loses an essential component to the understanding of western philosophy, art, history, language and literature.

By this petition, we ask the preservation in the long term of one Latin professorship at the Free University of Brussels. We are convinced that such position can serve the purpose of not only the faculty of arts, but also the entire university community.

To sign the petition click: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/557/100/788/quo-vadis-vub-zonder-latijn-free-university-of-brussels-without-latin/

"Qui tacet, consentire videtur".

View full article. | Posted in General Announcements on Tue, 10/08/2013 - 5:39am by .

Pages

Latest Stories

Calls for Papers
Classical Memories Modern Identities Series
Awards and Fellowships
Residential Fellowships 2021-22
SCS Announcements
Dear members and past annual meeting attendees,

© 2020, Society for Classical Studies Privacy Policy